Supination hand injury

tennis40luv

New User
I have an injury on my right hand from overuse. I thought I was better but today I tried to go for a topspin forehand winner and it became clear that it is still not healed. It hurt. The pain happens on the hand supination for example when I turn a car key or a door knob. It does not hurt on fh/bh slices or 2h backhands. The pain is not on the wrist but on the base of the hand under the finger knuckles. Not on the palm, but on the top of the hand near the wrist.

I use a semi western grip with heavy topspin. It's my bread and butter shot.

Has anyone experienced something like that?

I know I will probably have to work on generating topspin without using so much supination of the hand and wrist but I am just looking for advice. This is the second time that happens to me in less than a year.
 

tennis40luv

New User
If I am putting my hand on a flat surface, the pain is on top, not on the palm. I mean under the fingers base, not the knuckles.
 

Jarno Saari

New User
You might have tennis elbow..
I had it 3 years but find ways to cure it.
You can check my video serie abouth tennis elbow. Hope it helps

 

SystemicAnomaly

Talk Tennis Guru
Hand pain but no forearm pain (near the elbow or near the wrist)?

Is the grip size of your racket too small or too large for your hand? Are you gripping the racket too tightly when you hit those topspin shots? Perhaps you need to keep it more relaxed at the start of your swing and make sure it is relaxed again after the ball has left your strings.

If you keep the hand relaxed most of the time and just let it firm up naturally as you accelerate the racket head into the ball. Do not squeeze the handle forcefully or even actively. Just let it firm up naturally.
 

SystemicAnomaly

Talk Tennis Guru
Your description is confusing. Not very clear. Are you talking about pain near the base knuckles of your fingers? As opposed to the knuckles closer to your fingertips? The knuckles at the base of the fingers may be referred to as the 1st or major knuckles while the knuckles at the midfinger are known as the 2nd and 3rd, or minor, knuckles.

The metacarpals are bones in the "meat" of the hand. The metacarpals end (begin?) at the base knuckles of the fingers

 

Curiosity

Professional
I'm not sure why you would supinate the hand to generate topspin. It seems to me you can supinate the forearm, but it won't generate topspin.

Assuming you do "put your racquet into lag, lay back your wrist" at the start of forehand forward motion, as people are wont to say it (as a way to say "just as you initiate forward motion in the forehand, externally rotate your upper hitting arm in the shoulder joint," aka "perform ESR")...

Then generate your topspin not with intentional hand action, but by cultivating ISR, internal rotation of the hitting upper arm in the shoulder socket, up into and through contact: Strong ESR at the start gets the racquet head low, so you'll be swing low-to-high as well. That's how most players (or "trained players") generate topspin. If you can lay on a bit of bicep and pec as well (be Nadal?), that's fine, too. Don't use much if any hand or wrist/forearm action. ISR will cause your racquet head to 1. rise quickly in the plane of the stringbed; 2. accelerate forward in the direction of the net; 3. tilt a bit foreward, slightly closed. Your hand will thank you for leaving the wrist looser, laid back, through contact. The ISR will suffice for big topspin. JMV.
 

SystemicAnomaly

Talk Tennis Guru
I'm not sure why you would supinate the hand to generate topspin. It seems to me you can supinate the forearm, but it won't generate topspin.

Assuming you do "put your racquet into lag, lay back your wrist" at the start of forehand forward motion, as people are wont to say it (as a way to say "just as you initiate forward motion in the forehand, externally rotate your upper hitting arm in the shoulder joint," aka "perform ESR")...

Then generate your topspin not with intentional hand action, but by cultivating ISR, internal rotation of the hitting upper arm in the shoulder socket, up into and through contact: Strong ESR at the start gets the racquet head low, so you'll be swing low-to-high as well. That's how most players (or "trained players") generate topspin. If you can lay on a bit of bicep and pec as well (be Nadal?), that's fine, too. Don't use much if any hand or wrist/forearm action. ISR will cause your racquet head to 1. rise quickly in the plane of the stringbed; 2. accelerate forward in the direction of the net; 3. tilt a bit foreward, slightly closed. Your hand will thank you for leaving the wrist looser, laid back, through contact. The ISR will suffice for big topspin. JMV.
Either forearm supination (w/no elbow rotation) or a shoulder rotation (the elbow turns) might be required. It depends, in part, on the type of Fh grip employed. If a pat-the-dog or a palm-down orientation is employed at the start of the forward swing, the hand needs to be rotated in order to properly present the strings to the ball for topspin. This hand rotation can be achieved with either a slight forearm supination or with a mild external rotation of the shoulder.
 

Curiosity

Professional
Either forearm supination (w/no elbow rotation) or a shoulder rotation (the elbow turns) might be required. It depends, in part, on the type of Fh grip employed. If a pat-the-dog or a palm-down orientation is employed at the start of the forward swing, the hand needs to be rotated in order to properly present the strings to the ball for topspin. This hand rotation can be achieved with either a slight forearm supination or with a mild external rotation of the shoulder.
I would suppose we can agree that the problem the poster described, about his hand, isn't about rotating his hand, but about the effect which rotating his forearm or upper arm has on his hand. I haven't seen a good player that rotates only his forearm without the elbow rotating, but I may have watched too few players carefully. As for "mild external rotation of the (upper arm in the shoulder socket...) shoulder," most good players don't do that so mildly: Start with Nadal, Federer, and go down the list. Perhaps it's just me, but I'd call it "vigorous ESR."

Perhaps it's a matter of words, but it isn't the hand that needs to be rotated, it's the racquet. And the arm. The hand's just going along for the ride, or so it seems to me. I'm sure, though, that if you could see the poster on court, you'd be able to straighten him out. Personally, I suspect a grip problem. Best.
 

Niwrad0

New User
I have this same pain, just posted today. Will likely do pronation strengthen and bicep curls etc but still looking for more info
 

SystemicAnomaly

Talk Tennis Guru
If I am putting my hand on a flat surface, the pain is on top, not on the palm. I mean under the fingers base, not the knuckles.
I have this same pain, just posted today. Will likely do pronation strengthen and bicep curls etc but still looking for more info
Same pain as OP? Supinator muscles are located in the forearm (and biceps when the elbow is bent). At this point, the only thing there comes to my mind is a possible radial nerve injury. Best to consult with a physio (PT) or medical pro for an accurate diagnosis

 

yossarian

Professional
Same pain as OP? Supinator muscles are located in the forearm (and biceps when the elbow is bent). At this point, the only thing there comes to my mind is a possible radial nerve injury. Best to consult with a physio (PT) or medical pro for an accurate diagnosis

You’d feel that a few finger widths away from the lateral epicondyle. Similar to tennis elbow (which is usually directly on the epicondyle)

oh I thought you meant radial tunnel. The nerve can be entrapped elsewhere
 
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