switching from 1h backhand to 2h backhand

going to switch from a 1h to a 2h backhand because i never really hit a 1h in a match, i usually slice it. SO, any tips for a 2h backhand? Is it gonna be a hard transition?

My friend told me to use a continental for my lower hand and a eastern forehand for my upper hand. correct?

please give me some advice
thanks
 
Seriously, man, you're giving up already? Just stick with one and really work to get it down. Better to do one right then half ass your way through both.

Improvement doesn't always happen overnight. Expect to hit thousands of balls before you start to feel comfortable. This game isn't easy.

Matt
 

Jaewonnie

Professional
its easy. I use both 1H and 2H. The contact area for the 2h backhand is a bit closer to your side than the 1H backhand contact area which is infront and to the side of you.
 
i hit with the 2h backhand today and i reckon its only slightly worse than my
1 hander, and i hadn't hit a 2hander for about 3 years.

So yeah. What i found was that power was quiet hard to generate. Is it because my left arm is 1/2 as strong as my right :confused: My left shoulder is hurting right now, after hitting those 2h backhands. I guess its normal right?
 

Bud

Bionic Poster
going to switch from a 1h to a 2h backhand because i never really hit a 1h in a match, i usually slice it. SO, any tips for a 2h backhand? Is it gonna be a hard transition?

My friend told me to use a continental for my lower hand and a eastern forehand for my upper hand. correct?

please give me some advice
thanks

I use Eastern (lower) and Semi-Western (upper)... although I'm trying to learn to hit SW/SW... so I don't have to rotate the racquet for serve returns. This SW/SW form requires a conscious effort keeping the racquet face closed at contact.

The ready position (both hand on the grip) for me is SW/SW... usually you try and mimic your forehand grip with both hands for the ready position. This is why I'm trying to use the dual SW grip on the 2HBH.

The biggest thing is stick with it... you'll CONSTANTLY yearn to switch back to your 1HBH. Also, try playing some lower level players with the 2HBH to build your confidence up. It will also even the tables until your 2HBH improves to where your 1 is currently.
 

The Don

Rookie
I personally like 1hb more. everytime i try using 2 hand back hand it always feels like him hitting frame. like its a dull sound it doesnt have that ping sound as with my 1hb. Just stick with what you like more. but 1 hb is cool if you ask me and better feeling.
 

maverick66

Hall of Fame
going to switch from a 1h to a 2h backhand because i never really hit a 1h in a match, i usually slice it. SO, any tips for a 2h backhand? Is it gonna be a hard transition?

My friend told me to use a continental for my lower hand and a eastern forehand for my upper hand. correct?

please give me some advice
thanks

nice you decided to hit backhands like a man. welcome to substance over flash. one handers look pretty but are not as solid as a 2.

way i learned to hit a good two hander was playing mini tennis with my left hand then with a one hander then putting the 2 together. gave me a solid twohander as i could feel the way my racket should go through the ball.
 
nice you decided to hit backhands like a man. welcome to substance over flash. one handers look pretty but are not as solid as a 2.

way i learned to hit a good two hander was playing mini tennis with my left hand then with a one hander then putting the 2 together. gave me a solid twohander as i could feel the way my racket should go through the ball.

I always wondered why only 1 player in the top 10 uses a 1 hander (federer). Is it because 2h is substance and 1h is flash?

Anyway, i'll stick to a 2 hander. I'm wondering when i hit the ball should my left arm be generating more power and my right is a guide, or is it half half, or does my right arm generate more power? I'm right handed btw
 

maverick66

Hall of Fame
I always wondered why only 1 player in the top 10 uses a 1 hander (federer). Is it because 2h is substance and 1h is flash?

Anyway, i'll stick to a 2 hander. I'm wondering when i hit the ball should my left arm be generating more power and my right is a guide, or is it half half, or does my right arm generate more power? I'm right handed btw

you should see your consistency go way up with the two hander. might be harder to find certain angles that you used to but consistency should be very high. its personal on which hand does the work. i was the left hitting and the rigt hand was along for the ride. some are equal. i know aggasi used to hit it with his right arm and his left was just there. biggest thing is make sure you rotate with your core and that your hands extend after contact.
 
nice you decided to hit backhands like a man. welcome to substance over flash. one handers look pretty but are not as solid as a 2.

Maverick, I respect you and most of your responses, but this is a load of sentimental hogwash.

The one hander is a simple shot when taught correctly, very comparable to the two hander, actually. And therein lies the problem.... the quality of the INSTRUCTION, and not the backhand itself.

Matt
 

Nellie

Hall of Fame
I'm wondering when i hit the ball should my left arm be generating more power and my right is a guide, or is it half half, or does my right arm generate more power? I'm right handed btw

There is no definite answer - different people play with different dominant arms. Myself, I think it is easier to learn and develope the 2hbh by using the left hand (if you are a righty). Specifically, keep that right elbow attached to your side, and push through the left. Many of the best two-handers use power from both hands, but that can come later once you have the stroke down. In fact, I find really helpful to practice by using only the thumb and index finger of the right hand to guide the racquet, left arm to push.

For many people, the hardest part of switching to the 2hbh, is trying to push the ball with the shoulders and over-rotating with the shoulders during contact. Instead, if you watch clips of pros and freeze at contact, you will see that the backhand side (usually left) arm extending through contact with the ball to provide the power.
 

maverick66

Hall of Fame
Maverick, I respect you and most of your responses, but this is a load of sentimental hogwash.

The one hander is a simple shot when taught correctly, very comparable to the two hander, actually. And therein lies the problem.... the quality of the INSTRUCTION, and not the backhand itself.

Matt

i knew you would come in an argue this as your the leader of the one handers. the two hander is much more stable. his consistency will improve. the one hander allows you to add more variety to your backhand and find some angles easier but its not a consistent shot.
 
C

chico9166

Guest
Maverick, I respect you and most of your responses, but this is a load of sentimental hogwash.

The one hander is a simple shot when taught correctly, very comparable to the two hander, actually. And therein lies the problem.... the quality of the INSTRUCTION, and not the backhand itself
.

Matt

Let me get this straight, the one handed backhand is both easy to learn and simple to master, but yet above the comprehension level of most instructors to understand/teach? Hmmmm......

Perhaps, you should actually teach a lesson or two, before you indict the entire teaching profession.
 
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CoachingMastery

Professional
While it could be the quality (or lack of quality) of the instructor teaching a solid one-handed backhand, the reality of why most players don't master the one-handed backhand is the perception of the player.

One-handed backhands produce a perception of weakness for many. In addition, the stroke lends itself to players embellishing the shot with movements that are usually unnecessary and only pollute the shot forcing the player to then add other elements to counter the ones they are employing.

The two-handed stroke, for most, provide simple "key position points" that the player can recognize and mimic, sort of like a "dot to dot" strategium that allows the player to recognize swing components, replicate them, and then smooth them out finally to be a complete stroke.

And I have a one-handed backhand...but teach most students a two-handed backhand. (Even as I might be a 5.5 player, my 35 years of teaching has shown me without question most juniors and adults learn the backhand faster with better skills and are less likely to develop strange habits than if they try the one-hander for a period of time.)

Because players typically take one lesson a week, (maybe a few clinics too), they don't spend quality time in what it takes to master the feel and stroke of a one-handed backhand. Yet, there are many who can and it does take a good pro to recognize those who have the propensity, and who can recognize that the time spent working the shot, will produce a quality stroke in time.
 
i knew you would come in an argue this as your the leader of the one handers. the two hander is much more stable. his consistency will improve. the one hander allows you to add more variety to your backhand and find some angles easier but its not a consistent shot.

I'm not biased towards the one hander in any way. In fact, I encouraged my youngest brother to stick to the 2HBH, despite his ability to hit both. But as someone who's developed a passable 1HBH without all that much work, I feel qualified to say that it's not SUPER hard. My other brother has a solid one hander that many say is better than his forehand.

Also, experienced coaches like TM and Bungalo Bill say this as well. Don't assume that everything I say comes directly from myself. Funny thing, knowledge.... it's usually acquired from others. I was never one to ignore the voice of experience, personally.
Let me get this straight, the one handed backhand is both easy to learn and simple to master, but yet above the comprehension level of most instructors to understand/teach? Hmmmm......

Perhaps, you should actually teach a lesson or two, before you indict the entire teaching profession.
Yeah, again, jumping to conclusions. No need for bitterness just because I see things differently.
 
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pushing_wins

Hall of Fame
I'm not biased towards the one hander in any way. In fact, I encouraged my youngest brother to stick to the 2HBH, despite his ability to hit both. But as someone who's developed a passable 1HBH without all that much work, I feel qualified to say that it's not SUPER hard. My other brother has a solid one hander that many say is better than his forehand.

Also, experienced coaches like TM and Bungalo Bill say this as well. Don't assume that everything I say comes directly from myself. Funny thing, knowledge.... it's usually acquired from others. I was never one to ignore the voice of experience, personally.

Yeah, again, jumping to conclusions. No need for bitterness just because I see things differently.

dj videos to come?????
 

McNasty911

New User
Lol this tread turned into a 1hbh vs 2hbh thread.
All that has to b said is

Anyone can do anything the other backhand can do. 2 hands can transition to net well, and 1 can b stable on serves. I just depends i wut the person wants and wut theyre good at.


But to help gangster i say. New backhands take an extremely long time to become reliable. Don't give up because it doesn't work at the start.
 
But to help gangster i say. New backhands take an extremely long time to become reliable. Don't give up because it doesn't work at the start.

I realised i don't have the time to construct a new backhand.

I decided to stick to my 1h backhand. A reason i wanted to use 2h was because the right side of my body is alot stronger than my left, so i feel some pain in my back. But i'm doing weights for my left side now so i'll just stick with the 1hander and keep working on it.

You guys had me thinking very hard, but i swear to keep a 1h backhand.
 

maverick66

Hall of Fame
I realised i don't have the time to construct a new backhand.

I decided to stick to my 1h backhand. A reason i wanted to use 2h was because the right side of my body is alot stronger than my left, so i feel some pain in my back. But i'm doing weights for my left side now so i'll just stick with the 1hander and keep working on it.

You guys had me thinking very hard, but i swear to keep a 1h backhand.

you were gonna be a man and use a 2hander. now you go back to that flashy no substance 1 handed backhand. instead of a grinder youve become a sissy little feel player:twisted:
 
you were gonna be a man and use a 2hander. now you go back to that flashy no substance 1 handed backhand. instead of a grinder youve become a sissy little feel player:twisted:

uhhh i am no grinder and i am proud :)

However, i definately enjoy beating grinders.
 

marosmith

Professional
I'm not biased towards the one hander in any way. In fact, I encouraged my youngest brother to stick to the 2HBH, despite his ability to hit both. But as someone who's developed a passable 1HBH without all that much work, I feel qualified to say that it's not SUPER hard. My other brother has a solid one hander that many say is better than his forehand.

Also, experienced coaches like TM and Bungalo Bill say this as well. Don't assume that everything I say comes directly from myself. Funny thing, knowledge.... it's usually acquired from others. I was never one to ignore the voice of experience, personally.

Yeah, again, jumping to conclusions. No need for bitterness just because I see things differently.


I agree. My 1HBH has been catching on for me quickly, and I have been able to put quite a bit of topspin on it very naturally. I think part of it is natural proclivity, and another part body type. The 2HBH has to be accompanied with a 1HBH for some defensive shots, long reaches, and with the slice anyway, so if you can do the 1HBH effectively, I don't understand why you wouldn't.
 

Majik

Rookie
I am also thinking about changing to a 2HBH. I'm a one hander, but think a 2HBH might be good for service returns and open stance shots. Though I like the 1HBH because of the top spin I can generate. Is it possible to do both, or would that just make me hesitate while trying to decide which to use?
 

Bud

Bionic Poster
I am also thinking about changing to a 2HBH. I'm a one hander, but think a 2HBH might be good for service returns and open stance shots. Though I like the 1HBH because of the top spin I can generate. Is it possible to do both, or would that just make me hesitate while trying to decide which to use?

It's awesome for service return... much better than a 1HBH (unless you slice everything).

However, IMO, it's difficult hitting an open stance 2HBH since setting up the shot requires major shoulder rotation from both hands being on the grip. The forced shoulder rotation is a major benefit of learning or using the 2HBH. I've seen various follow through methods, once the ball is struck using the 2HBH. Some players are more free with their dominant arm and some keep the arm tucked closely to the body.
 

Bud

Bionic Poster
Maverick, I respect you and most of your responses, but this is a load of sentimental hogwash.

The one hander is a simple shot when taught correctly, very comparable to the two hander, actually. And therein lies the problem.... the quality of the INSTRUCTION, and not the backhand itself.

Matt

Agreed. It has nothing to do with flash or showmanship. It's almost like right or left handedness. Some people are naturally 1HBH players and some are naturally 2HBH players. I'm still trying to get comfortable with a 2HBH. It simply does not feel as natural as the 1HBH to me.
 

Fedace

Banned
2-handed backhand is so much superior in today's game. It is essential to combat the heavy topspin serves and high bouncing groundies. If you have good mechanics your body shouldn't get in the way. That is why 98% of the pros use 2 hands.
 

Bud

Bionic Poster
There is no definite answer - different people play with different dominant arms. Myself, I think it is easier to learn and develope the 2hbh by using the left hand (if you are a righty). Specifically, keep that right elbow attached to your side, and push through the left. Many of the best two-handers use power from both hands, but that can come later once you have the stroke down. In fact, I find really helpful to practice by using only the thumb and index finger of the right hand to guide the racquet, left arm to push.

For many people, the hardest part of switching to the 2hbh, is trying to push the ball with the shoulders and over-rotating with the shoulders during contact. Instead, if you watch clips of pros and freeze at contact, you will see that the backhand side (usually left) arm extending through contact with the ball to provide the power.

Great post! You hit on the important points of the 2HBH. The majority of the power should come from the non-dominant arm. The dominant arm simply acts as a pivot or a guide for the racquet.

The pros do use power from both arms and thus are not the best to mimic when learning the stroke. For the novice, keep the dominant arm tucked closely to the body and use it to guide the racquet.
 

Bud

Bionic Poster
2-handed backhand is so much superior in today's game. It is essential to combat the heavy topspin serves and high bouncing groundies. If you have good mechanics your body shouldn't get in the way. That is why 98% of the pros use 2 hands.

Yes, however with the 2HBH you must take the ball very early (on the rise) and before it's above your waist. There's nothing worse than hitting a high ball using the 2HBH. The 1HBH is much more effective for high balls not taken on the rise.

All the good players using the 2HBH take the ball early. If they take it too late... you'll see them jump in the air to hit the ball in the strike zone. I think Nishikori does it quite a bit... as does Fish.
 

marosmith

Professional
2-handed backhand is so much superior in today's game. It is essential to combat the heavy topspin serves and high bouncing groundies. If you have good mechanics your body shouldn't get in the way. That is why 98% of the pros use 2 hands.

You are full of crap.
 
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