Switching hands

FatalStroke

New User
I was thinking last night of the irony, that a player is his own worst enemy when it comes to tennis elbow. Most of us will take great risks, to keep playing despite elbow pain, likely only increasing downtime. Somehow we find this better then another simple solution,, drop your ego, drop your perceived ability, and play with your other arm..

Bout to get whooped by my gf while i take it easy on my good arm,, but at least ill be on the court and inproving my game
 

dman72

Hall of Fame
I was thinking last night of the irony, that a player is his own worst enemy when it comes to tennis elbow. Most of us will take great risks, to keep playing despite elbow pain, likely only increasing downtime. Somehow we find this better then another simple solution,, drop your ego, drop your perceived ability, and play with your other arm..

Bout to get whooped by my gf while i take it easy on my good arm,, but at least ill be on the court and inproving my game

I'd start over as a lefty rather than not play. For someone with severe TE, why not? Imagine the accomplishment you'd feel if you reached the same level you were at previously with your off arm? Maybe you could actually break some old bad habits and re-learn the game.
 

FatalStroke

New User
I'd start over as a lefty rather than not play. For someone with severe TE, why not? Imagine the accomplishment you'd feel if you reached the same level you were at previously with your off arm? Maybe you could actually break some old bad habits and re-learn the game.

According to vic braden, a couple well known players from the 80s and 90s were left handed but forced by parents to switch,, thinking right handers have an advantage. The result? These guys would have incredible two handed backhands unique from right hand dominant players. I played ladt year when I was new, with either hand, and in a pinch have been known to switch to a left handed forehand to reach a fast ball. Hell why not learn how to do it right.
 

LeeD

Bionic Poster
You guys are probably newbies to the game of tennis.
To learn to switch hands, it takes years off your game with your good hand, and most ambi hitters never ever learn to play a serious match using both hands.
If you're prone to tennis elbow with one hand, you WILL get it using the other hand, just need equal time hitting the ball equally hard.
While it's not hard to learn to play using the other hand, none of your peers will play with your while you're learning, and they are getting better all the time.
Now if you plan on staying a beginner forever, YES, it's a good idea.
I DO have several buds who can hit with both hands almost equally well, at the 5.5 level, meaning they are good enough to play for a major university, D-1, but are too old now.
But they play their serious sets using only the strong hand.
 
You guys are probably newbies to the game of tennis.
To learn to switch hands, it takes years off your game with your good hand, and most ambi hitters never ever learn to play a serious match using both hands.
If you're prone to tennis elbow with one hand, you WILL get it using the other hand, just need equal time hitting the ball equally hard.
While it's not hard to learn to play using the other hand, none of your peers will play with your while you're learning, and they are getting better all the time.
Now if you plan on staying a beginner forever, YES, it's a good idea.
I DO have several buds who can hit with both hands almost equally well, at the 5.5 level, meaning they are good enough to play for a major university, D-1, but are too old now.
But they play their serious sets using only the strong hand.

Please retire.
 

LeeD

Bionic Poster
Exactly as I mentioned, TennisPro. You are a newbie, so you don't know how impossible it is to switch hands for tennis.
 
Side question for anyone who's tried it just because I'm curious:

What's faster in terms of learning to play well enough to be competitive on a recreational level (3.0 or greater)? Starting the game as a brand new player with your dominant hand, or starting the game over as an experienced player with your non-dominant hand?
 

LeeD

Bionic Poster
As usual. depends.....
If you're already a decent player, you have the huge advantage of KNOWING what to do, how to do it, and you only need to train that clumsy, unused side of your body to obey your mind's instructions.
If you are newbie, lack of knowledge, and failure to BELIEVE what is needed will hold you back much longer.
However, a great player with an unusable other hand will never learn to play with the other hand.
And the newbie who has total coaching, is athletic, and believes in his coach's advice, and advice from knowledgeable players, might be decently good after only a few short years.
 
Switching hands is possible even at higher levels. Nicolas Rosenzweig had a highest ranking around 700 in 2012 and did it. So dont be put off by the problem (and those that say it cannot be done), practice hard and find a solution. I believe it can be a very useful skill at the rec level. Have fun.
 
D

Deleted member 120290

Guest
Switching hands is possible even at higher levels. Nicolas Rosenzweig had a highest ranking around 700 in 2012 and did it. So dont be put off by the problem (and those that say it cannot be done), practice hard and find a solution. I believe it can be a very useful skill at the rec level. Have fun.

Yeah but he's using Natural tennis racket with 2 grips so he is not really switching hands. As a natural righty with arm issues, I tried playing left handed and also using 2 FH's for a year. I can beat most 3.5 whereas normally I play 4.5. Switching hands takes too much time as LeeD says. And my lefty serve and overhead are weak.
 
you can do this, but you will basically have to start all the way down again (3.0 Level or what that is called in the US).

FH is the easiest to learn and serve the hardest. volleys should work well, 1HBH is not easy either.
 
Side question for anyone who's tried it just because I'm curious:

What's faster in terms of learning to play well enough to be competitive on a recreational level (3.0 or greater)? Starting the game as a brand new player with your dominant hand, or starting the game over as an experienced player with your non-dominant hand?

depends on your coordination. some have a good non dominant Hand and other do not.

generally the experienced Player will still have his footwork, Balance, tactics, Fitness and mental strength while the beginner has to start from the scratch but might have a better control over his non dominant Hand (especially if he played other sports).
 
Yeah but he's using Natural tennis racket with 2 grips so he is not really switching hands. As a natural righty with arm issues, I tried playing left handed and also using 2 FH's for a year. I can beat most 3.5 whereas normally I play 4.5. Switching hands takes too much time as LeeD says. And my lefty serve and overhead are weak.

He didnt use the natural tennis racket the last time I saw him play- where did you see this? He used a semi overlap grip (both hands on with the index and thumd of the other hand on top of the main hand). Have a look,

http://www.tennislegend.fr/nicolas-rosenzweig-lhomme-aux-deux-coups-droits/

Also try looking at Yevgeniya Kulikovskaya who made the top 100 in 2003, I think shes a bit better than youre average 4.5.
 
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ARKustom93

Professional
I was thinking last night of the irony, that a player is his own worst enemy when it comes to tennis elbow. Most of us will take great risks, to keep playing despite elbow pain, likely only increasing downtime. Somehow we find this better then another simple solution,, drop your ego, drop your perceived ability, and play with your other arm..

Bout to get whooped by my gf while i take it easy on my good arm,, but at least ill be on the court and inproving my game

Not a "simple solution" ...

As a first step, try to figure out what's causing your TE. If it's a technique and/or setup related issue, fix it!!
 
D

Deleted member 120290

Guest
He didnt use the natural tennis racket the last time I saw him play- where did you see this? He used a semi overlap grip (both hands on with the index and thumd of the other hand on top of the main hand). Have a look,

http://www.tennislegend.fr/nicolas-rosenzweig-lhomme-aux-deux-coups-droits/

Also try looking at Yevgeniya Kulikovskaya who made the top 100 in 2003, I think shes a bit better than youre average 4.5.

Natural tennis advertises him on its website.

On clay you have a lot more time. He won't be able to do that on hard court and no way on grass. For his level his LH FH is weak and worse than a good right handers BH.

Yevgeniya Kulikovskaya is one in 6 Billion who made it that high. The other 99 players in Top 100 in the last 12 years did not use 2 FH's.

My 2 FH's were good enough for people at my club to stop and watch. But my conventional FH+BH would still beat my 2 FH easily, 6-2.
 

shindemac

Hall of Fame
I was thinking last night of the irony, that a player is his own worst enemy when it comes to tennis elbow. Most of us will take great risks, to keep playing despite elbow pain, likely only increasing downtime. Somehow we find this better then another simple solution,, drop your ego, drop your perceived ability, and play with your other arm..

Bout to get whooped by my gf while i take it easy on my good arm,, but at least ill be on the court and inproving my game

sometimes it is good to switch hands and use your other hand when your main one becomes tired or injured. but what can be done when your legs are tired? Can you switch legs?
 
Natural tennis advertises him on its website.

On clay you have a lot more time. He won't be able to do that on hard court and no way on grass. For his level his LH FH is weak and worse than a good right handers BH.

Yevgeniya Kulikovskaya is one in 6 Billion who made it that high. The other 99 players in Top 100 in the last 12 years did not use 2 FH's.

My 2 FH's were good enough for people at my club to stop and watch. But my conventional FH+BH would still beat my 2 FH easily, 6-2.

He doesn't use the natural.

Funny how his favourite surface is hard court, must be a masochist. Looks like he won a HC futures in doubles last year too...

I didn't realise there were 6 billion people who hit with 2fhs, wow.

Anyway I can see that your determined to stay with you view dispite evidence to the contrary. No more detracting from the OPs question relating to rec level tennis.
 
D

Deleted member 120290

Guest
He doesn't use the natural.

Funny how his favourite surface is hard court, must be a masochist. Looks like he won a HC futures in doubles last year too...

I didn't realise there were 6 billion people who hit with 2fhs, wow.

Anyway I can see that your determined to stay with you view dispite evidence to the contrary. No more detracting from the OPs question relating to rec level tennis.

"ATP player Nicolas Rosenzweig hitting forhands off both sides!
Natural Tennis
www.NATURALTENNIS.com"

1 WTA and 1 Futures player in the history of tennis is no "evidence to the contrary." I'm speaking from my personal experience. If some people can do it, great for them. As LeeD says, you can invest all that time hitting conventional method, you would progress further. Judging by Rosenzweig's unimpressive LH FH at pro level, he would have done better listening to LeeD.
 
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"If some people can do it, great for them.

Sorry I misunderstood your posts. I thought you were saying that it was not possible at a high level (Pro). What you were actually saying is that you couldnt do it....yet

My mistake.

A video of him hitting with two forehands is not the same as him using the Natural tennis racket. They also posted a link to Simon from Top-tennis training hitting not using the Natural tennis racket.

I was too busy getting an education at school. (Nice edit out by the way)

Recent research suggests that learning to hit with your non-dom hand can actually improve dom technique so its not as simple as saying you'd be better off just hitting with a single hand. Have a look at Bilateral transfer by Stöckel, Weigelt, and Krug (2011) as a starter.
 
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D

Deleted member 120290

Guest
Now Simon from Top Tennis is very impressive from both sides. But if his life depended on it, he would play the match with FH+BH. If someone's arm is injured and he has to play with the other hand or use 2 FH's as I did for a year, then there is no other choice. However from my personal experience, 2 FH level is significantly lower than my conventional level.
 
I think you are derailing the thread: this is not about hitting two FHs, but about hitting ALL strokes with your non dominant Hand due to injury of the dominant Hand.

that is much harder to do than playing a left handed FH because the FH is the most simple and easiest to coordinate stroke.

the real challenge is serving with the non dominant Hand (ball toss, Overhead throwing Motion) and also hitting a 1HBH is not easy.

I can hit an acceptable FH with my non dominant Hand (2HBH carryover) but I can't hit a serve or even 1HBH to save my life.
 
I think you are derailing the thread: this is not about hitting two FHs, but about hitting ALL strokes with your non dominant Hand due to injury of the dominant Hand.

that is much harder to do than playing a left handed FH because the FH is the most simple and easiest to coordinate stroke.

the real challenge is serving with the non dominant Hand (ball toss, Overhead throwing Motion) and also hitting a 1HBH is not easy.

I can hit an acceptable FH with my non dominant Hand (2HBH carryover) but I can't hit a serve or even 1HBH to save my life.

Yep, sorry.
 

LeeD

Bionic Poster
I suspect, the lower the level, the more chances of seeing player's using oft hand forehands, instead of backhands, in MATCH play.
Somewhere around 4.5, a lot of players can hit well with their other hand, but during MATCH play, except for one or 3 abberations, every one would choose to use their dominant hand on every shot.
 

USS Tang

Rookie
I'm a 69-year old, 4.5 righty. For the past two weeks years, I have practiced serving left-handed to be ready in case I need rotator cuff surgery on the right shoulder. Gotta cover all the bases. Right?
 

LeeD

Bionic Poster
You're unique in this world of old farts.
I have several friends who were top 5 NorCal A players, 5.5+, back in the early '80's, and while all 3 are TOP 5 California 70's seniors now, none admit to playing "4.5" levels. One of them was the World Champ for '50's, back in the 'late 80's, and even he ranks himself as a "high 4.0". These guys always face each other in the 70's age group, and all faced each other in the finals of every NorCal 65's age group in the past few years.
I'm a low 4.0, and while I can't beat them consistently in singles, in doubles we're very even, with no edge to any amongst us. I'm 66 and lots of you guys rate me "3.0".
 

LGQ7

Hall of Fame
sometimes it is good to switch hands and use your other hand when your main one becomes tired or injured. but what can be done when your legs are tired? Can you switch legs?

Switch hands is switching legs. Look at your old tennis shoes. The soles wear out in an asymmetrical pattern because you put weight differently on each foot. Switching hands forces you to mirror your footwork, so you are switching legs.

Switching legs is switching hands. Ronda Rousey hurt her knee (I forgot which one) in Judo. So she can't throw normally so she had to switch legs and thus switch hands. She can throw right handed and left handed. She is twice as capable as a normal judoka.

And yes you can switch legs.

Bill Superfoot Wallace KO kick is the left kick. He learned to left kick because he injured his right knee. And the left kick catch people by surprise because it is unusual.
 
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