Taking Advil/Motrin before playing?

Just wondering if any middle age players take ibuprofen before playing?
I generally only take it after playing, but not every time. If I play 4/wk would it be more beneficial to take 2 pills before or after, and is this weekly amount safe?
 

power_play21

Semi-Pro
Just wondering if any middle age players take ibuprofen before playing?
I generally only take it after playing, but not every time. If I play 4/wk would it be more beneficial to take 2 pills before or after, and is this weekly amount safe?
ask your doctor, not a tennis board full of children.
 

Rickson

G.O.A.T.
Just wondering if any middle age players take ibuprofen before playing?
I generally only take it after playing, but not every time. If I play 4/wk would it be more beneficial to take 2 pills before or after, and is this weekly amount safe?
Do not take a pain killer before tennis! After is ok, but never before. Pain is your friend and it's never more true than while you're competing in some sporting event. Pain will warn you of an impending injury so if you dull your pain receptors, you'll do your body a world of wrong. Pain is there to warn you, not to prevent you from playing tennis.
 

LuckyR

Legend
Just wondering if any middle age players take ibuprofen before playing?
I generally only take it after playing, but not every time. If I play 4/wk would it be more beneficial to take 2 pills before or after, and is this weekly amount safe?
I don't walk onto a court without 600 of Motrin under my belt. Rickson's advice makes logical sense on the face of it, but doesn't really apply here. That is, Motrin will not make you so numb that the warning pains will be undetectable. Part of the reason for this is that Motrin, of course is not a narcotic and so isn't technically a pain medication, it is, of course an antiinflamatory. That is the property I am after. It is much more beneficial to block the production of inflamatory chemicals in your body than to create them then come by later with a chemical to block their continued production after the fact.

This may sound like a bunch of mumbo jumbo, but trust me, there is an age where this will resonate with your common day to day experience. Many may not be there yet...
 
Brad Gilbert in his book "Winning Ugly" says he takes advil before playing, so I am sure its safe to do so. I guess the question is if I play 2 hours of tennis on a hard court, will I be less sore the next morning taking advil before or after I play?
 

Old_Crow

Rookie
Best advice is always to talk to your doctor first. But anecdotally...

I've had a few surgeries (PCL replacement & torn meniscus) on my right knee and my ortho surgeon advised me to take ibu-based anti-inflammatories before any serious physical exercise for the very reasons noted above.

When I was in rehab after the last roto-rooter job a couple years back, I was advised to use 800mg but I've gone down to 600mg for regular use, same as the poster above.
 

ollinger

G.O.A.T.
More complicated than you surmise. Ibuprofen is very irritating to the stomach, and some remains in the stomach as much as several hours after you take it. When you exercise, the part of the body that gives up the most circulation in order to supply the muscles is the GI tract. So you are dumping an irritant in the stomach and removing much of the circulation needed to clear it. Hmmm. Likewise the kidney, where ibuprofen impairs function. I think the point here is that medications have a variety of effects, and taking one just before physical stress is probably a bad idea unless absolutely necessary. You're impairing your organ systems at a time when they need to be optimal in order to deal with the stressors.
 

WildVolley

Legend
I agree with Ollinger, this isn't something you want to get carried away with, and it isn't something you'll necessarily get a good answer to by just talking to a doctor. I find that many doctors don't stay on top of the latest research and studies. It'd probably be best to contact a doctor who is a sports specialist.

The only good thing is that I've seen studies that suggest ibuprofen doesn't weaken ligaments.

Personally, I mostly avoid pain killers and rely on stretching, ice and massage after I play if I push too hard.
 

rbq4h4

Rookie
i have herd that ibuprofen and tylenol dilate the kidney artery and can make you have to go the bathroom more when taking, this alone wouldbe not for em to take beofer.
 

LuckyR

Legend
A couple of things: first material is not cleared from the stomach by blood circulation. Second, solid organs aren't going to get much blood flow during exercise anyway due to the muscle demands anyway so antiinflamitories probably won't make much difference there either. Lastly Motrin is not going to make you go to the bathroom during a match.

Let's face it, there are folks who take the stuff around the clock for various chronic ailments, so taking 600 once or twice a week (when those guys are taking that dose 4 times a day, practically every day) is pretty mild.
 

EKhan

New User
I usually take 1 or 2 of a prescribed NSAI. If I don't I can feel wrist and elbow twinges, nothing major enough to need to stop, just annoying.
 

Geezer Guy

Hall of Fame
An anti-inflamatory before playing can reduce inflamation while you're playing.
My Dr. recommended it, and I've been doing it for years.
(I take the Ibu's and eat small snack about 1/2 hour before playing.)
 

power_play21

Semi-Pro
wow, coming from a medical student, i would not take much advice from this thread. some people just love to post about what they dont have a clue.
 

Mitcheson

New User
It is obviously not natural to take NSAIDs such as ibuprofen and generally to be discouraged.

However, I have taken it many, many times - just 2 tablets BEFORE playing as I find it helps a lot with stiffness, aches, pains, sciatica and improves mobility etc. The motive is that I can move and play better and enjoy it more. Afterwards I am sore and stiff as hell but I am prepared to tolerate that and not take any more tablets. My thinking is that a mere 2 tablets overall shouldn't do much harm.

Brad Gilbert in his Winning Ugly book recommends taking 2 before and after ... but the 'after' is to save post match aches and pains.

I have tried hard to wean myself off it altogether but sometimes still end up taking it during play as sciatica or stiffness and aching are intolerable and wrecking my enjoyment and mobility. This approach is more flexible as on days when my body is good I can get away without taking any which is ideal.

The bottom line is to know how it affects you and use your own judgment and keep it to a minimum. My stomach is like leather and I do not have any noticable adverse effects whatsoever but many of my relatives and friends can't say the same.

 
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undecided

Rookie
Just wondering if any middle age players take ibuprofen before playing?
I generally only take it after playing, but not every time. If I play 4/wk would it be more beneficial to take 2 pills before or after, and is this weekly amount safe?
Not safe to take that much....I take 1 before I play IF my arm is achy from prior session. Long term NSAIDS are bad for kidneys and liver. Even longer term they affect the heart valves.
 

Dansan

New User
As long as you do not have any medical or medication contraindications, allergies, then yes you can take a low dose NSAID like ibuprofen prior to tennis. If you suffer from gastrointestinal issues, stomach ulcers - I would not be taking NSAIDS often.

But 200-400 mg is fine for most healthy adults. 600mg is a bit on the high side IMO if you are simply taking it preventively before tennis. I would not do this every day. I would try not to make it a habit either, but intermittently is fine (once in a while). Do not take NSAIDS without anything to drink along with it. It will damage your esophageal lining and stomach lining if it gets stuck on the way down, and will also cause a lot of pain while doing so. Don't take NSAIDS for months on end or in high doses regularly or it could cause kidney problems. It can also cause bleeding stomach ulcers or stomach lining perforations, or even cause cellular changes at the tissue level because of the chronic damage it does to stomach and esophageal lining if taken for long durations (months and years).

Acetaminophen is tylenol. It is toxic to your liver, don't take that one in high doses or for long durations either, and especially if you have existing liver issues avoid Tylenol. Tylenol is not anti-inflammatory like ibuprofen - which is why I prefer ibuprofen or naproxen instead.

For some reason I have some patients that like to put ibuprofen and aspirin directly on wounds because they think it will help them heal or take the pain away. Don't do this either.

But once in a while, if you want to take 1 or 2 advil prior to playing - for most healthy adults you should be fine.

You can take NSAIDS before or after playing tennis. If you are having a lot of bad pain/soreness you can take it once every 8 hours. If you take aleve instead, take it on a 12 hour interval. But again, do not take for long durations of more than 1-1.5 weeks unless you consult a doctor. If I take it at all, I will usually do it 30-45 min before playing. Reason being that it reduces inflammation during play. Just my 2cents , and as always consult your doc !
 

Nostradamus

Bionic Poster
More complicated than you surmise. Ibuprofen is very irritating to the stomach, and some remains in the stomach as much as several hours after you take it. When you exercise, the part of the body that gives up the most circulation in order to supply the muscles is the GI tract. So you are dumping an irritant in the stomach and removing much of the circulation needed to clear it. Hmmm. Likewise the kidney, where ibuprofen impairs function. I think the point here is that medications have a variety of effects, and taking one just before physical stress is probably a bad idea unless absolutely necessary. You're impairing your organ systems at a time when they need to be optimal in order to deal with the stressors.
LOL
 

ChaelAZ

Legend
For me it just depends on how I am feeling. Few aches and pains I work through with strtching and such. I trained a bit harder this weekend and have a match tonight so I took Naproxin this morning and might drop 200mg of ibuprofen a few hours before my match to get the little aches cleared. As a rule I don't take it often, but it helps.
 

LOBALOT

Semi-Pro
I have an odd way of looking at it. If I take Naproxen before playing In my mind I am taking it in the event that I may have pain after playing not knowing if I will or not. Therefore, I try to avoid taking it before I play and instead take it after if I need it. Of course being an old fart there are times I regret that decision!!!!

If I am achy or played the prior day I will take it before playing (like right about now) as I played yesterday and am playing in about an hour and I hobbled around all day at work.
 

HouTex

Rookie
As long as you do not have any medical or medication contraindications, allergies, then yes you can take a low dose NSAID like ibuprofen prior to tennis. If you suffer from gastrointestinal issues, stomach ulcers - I would not be taking NSAIDS often.

But 200-400 mg is fine for most healthy adults. 600mg is a bit on the high side IMO if you are simply taking it preventively before tennis. I would not do this every day. I would try not to make it a habit either, but intermittently is fine (once in a while). Do not take NSAIDS without anything to drink along with it. It will damage your esophageal lining and stomach lining if it gets stuck on the way down, and will also cause a lot of pain while doing so. Don't take NSAIDS for months on end or in high doses regularly or it could cause kidney problems. It can also cause bleeding stomach ulcers or stomach lining perforations, or even cause cellular changes at the tissue level because of the chronic damage it does to stomach and esophageal lining if taken for long durations (months and years).

Acetaminophen is tylenol. It is toxic to your liver, don't take that one in high doses or for long durations either, and especially if you have existing liver issues avoid Tylenol. Tylenol is not anti-inflammatory like ibuprofen - which is why I prefer ibuprofen or naproxen instead.

For some reason I have some patients that like to put ibuprofen and aspirin directly on wounds because they think it will help them heal or take the pain away. Don't do this either.

But once in a while, if you want to take 1 or 2 advil prior to playing - for most healthy adults you should be fine.

You can take NSAIDS before or after playing tennis. If you are having a lot of bad pain/soreness you can take it once every 8 hours. If you take aleve instead, take it on a 12 hour interval. But again, do not take for long durations of more than 1-1.5 weeks unless you consult a doctor. If I take it at all, I will usually do it 30-45 min before playing. Reason being that it reduces inflammation during play. Just my 2cents , and as always consult your doc !
During my 20+ month battle with tennis elbow I was taking two ibuprofen tablets each morning for the pain. At my annual physical my blood work showed decreased kidney function. I stopped taking the ibuprofen and my kidney function returned to normal.
 

Dim Sim

New User
Recent press (within the last 12-18 months) is that nsaids aren’t great for your heart over the long term. Worth looking into if you are thinking of taking it habitually.
 

Dartagnan64

Legend
I only do it before important matches. Caffeine and ibuprofen are my pre match PEDs.
But normally I try to warm up a lot instead of using Advil as a crutch for aches and pains.
 

SystemicAnomaly

Talk Tennis Guru
I only do it before important matches. Caffeine and ibuprofen are my pre match PEDs.
But normally I try to warm up a lot instead of using Advil as a crutch for aches and pains.
No creatine? From what I've heard, caffeine and creatine are the most effective legal PEDs used by tennis players and other athletes. Possibly even more effective than the meldonium that Sharapova had been using.
 

SystemicAnomaly

Talk Tennis Guru

SystemicAnomaly

Talk Tennis Guru
Yeah lower risk of Alzheimer's as you won't live long enough to get it :)
Alzheimer's is a horrible disease to endure. Much worse than some of the others you mentioned. Would not wish it on anyone. It was very painful seeing my mother go thru this (for nearly 3 decades) before she passed. My father also developed serious dementia in the last decade of his life (he passed at 91 yo). At 67, I've already experienced some early signs of dementia.
 

undecided

Rookie
Alzheimer's is a horrible disease to endure. Much worse than some of the others you mentioned. Would not wish it on anyone. It was very painful seeing my mother go thru this (for nearly 3 decades) before she passed. My father also developed serious dementia in the last decade of his life (he passed at 91 yo). At 67, I've already experienced some early signs of dementia.
I agree that it is terrible, my mother in law is going through it. But, had she poisoned her kidneys with NSAIDs like my mother did she would not have lived long enough to get dementia.
 
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