Technique in Pre-cutting String from Reel

#1
Hi, guys! I always buy a reel for my strings; however, I noticed that after every string job, there are too much excess and unused string from my stringer who pre-cuts the string to a desirable length.

Is there any technique that I can apply in pre-cutting a string that would be suitable to both 100 sq. inch head size and 93 sq. inch head size?

Many thanks!
 
#2
Hi, guys! I always buy a reel for my strings; however, I noticed that after every string job, there are too much excess and unused string from my stringer who pre-cuts the string to a desirable length.
So, are you saying that you are giving your reel to someone else who strings your racquet, and that they are cutting more off the reel than is really necessary?
I think that's what you're getting at. Correct me if I'm wrong.

Is there any technique that I can apply in pre-cutting a string that would be suitable to both 100 sq. inch head size and 93 sq. inch head size?
Yes, the "technique" would be to cut off a certain amount for the 100" frame and something less than that amount for the smaller 93" frame (this, of course, is assuming that both frames have the same pattern... 16x19, etc.)
Now... if they have different patterns, then all bets are off. For example, a 93" frame with a 18x20 pattern could possibly need even more string than a 100" frame with a 16x18 pattern.

Everything being equal, you (or your stringer) need to cut less for the smaller frame than the larger frame.
You (or the stringer) should've measured how much extra was left over for each of the two frames, at the end of the stringing process.
Subract the "extra" amount from the amount originally cut off the reel.
That then tells you the exact amount you will actually need, the next time that frame is strung - with that particular string.
Get the idea?
 
#3
machine used can make a difference as some machines may take more to reach tension head with string.
Type of string also makes a difference besides racquet size and pattern.
Also technique used can make a difference, as 2 pc. over 1 pc. and if 2 pc. if starting knot used or starting clamp, as starting clamp with finishing knot will use more.
Last thing you would want to do is be too short.
Sometimes you are careful and cut precisely and you have about 15' of worthless string left anyways.
If you really want to skimp on string, then learn to string your own and you can cut exactly what you want.
 
#4
Hi, guys! I always buy a reel for my strings; however, I noticed that after every string job, there are too much excess and unused string from my stringer who pre-cuts the string to a desirable length.

Is there any technique that I can apply in pre-cutting a string that would be suitable to both 100 sq. inch head size and 93 sq. inch head size?

Many thanks!
18x20 rackets use more string that 16 main rackets, and poly string will stretch a lot less than SG or Multi strings. not knowing any more details your question is impossible to answer accurately. And depending on how your stringer strings the rackets what you precut may or may not be enough.

For instance for a MS 16 MS frame (93 si) I generally use 34' of string with an 9' short side, and whats left on the long side I use for the crosses with a starting knot. That way I have very little left over. If your stringer assumes you gave him 40' of string and cuts it in half guess what happens.

Best to give the reel to the stringer and let him cut it.
 
#5
For mains: Measure 4.5 lengths of the racquet - double it. Good for mains for 16x19
Crosses: 3.75 lengths of a racquet - double it. Good for the crosses
 
#6
For mains: Measure 4.5 lengths of the racquet - double it. Good for mains for 16x19
Crosses: 3.75 lengths of a racquet - double it. Good for the crosses
Why double it and not just measure more racquet lengths?

In general, standard length racquet, 16x19 pattern, 100 square inch head size, polyester strings, I get away with 8.5 racquet lengths for the mains, and 8 + the handle for crosses. Depending on the racquet, the machine, the technique I decide to use, etc., I can use more or less.
 
#7
Why double it and not just measure more racquet lengths?

In general, standard length racquet, 16x19 pattern, 100 square inch head size, polyester strings, I get away with 8.5 racquet lengths for the mains, and 8 + the handle for crosses. Depending on the racquet, the machine, the technique I decide to use, etc., I can use more or less.
I just double it because counting to 8 is hard ;)
It's a habit at this point. But I find that measuring this way is effective.
 

eelhc

Hall of Fame
#9
Like others have said... measure racquet lengths of string... Also keep notes on how much you've cut, racquet, string, tension, etc.. after a while, you'll get an idea of how much to cut and how to adjust for racquet, tension.

I have completed several hundred string jobs in the 5~6 years I've been stringing. I have a record of how much string I cut for EVERY one of my string jobs.
 
#10
If you string your own frames:
Measure out 40' the 1st time. Do your mains. After tying off the mains, cut the string and start your crosses. Finish your crosses and tie off. Cut and measure the excess. If you hybrid, then just measure wastage after finishing your mains and crosses. 2nd time, you measure out only what is needed.

If you use a stringing service:
Measure and give 40' to the stringer. Ask the stringer to measure any wastage and report that back to you. The next time, you give the stringer 40' minus the wastage. Keep in mind that wastage can be minimized if you do not cut the string into mains and crosses. That's because you can save the lengths needed for starting crosses by cutting the string after tying mains. If you hybrid, you will need lengths to do 4 knots.

There are other threads on this subject and a simple search will yield basically this info. To quickly measure string length, I use a piece of 1"x4"x35" that has been notched and marked at 12 and 24". Go around once and that's 6'.
 
#11
Hi, guys! I always buy a reel for my strings; however, I noticed that after every string job, there are too much excess and unused string from my stringer who pre-cuts the string to a desirable length.

Is there any technique that I can apply in pre-cutting a string that would be suitable to both 100 sq. inch head size and 93 sq. inch head size?

Many thanks!
When I put a racquet on my machine and measure the string I want for the mains or crosses - this is for stringing two-piece - I use the racquet head itself to measure out the right amount.

For the mains, I measure off lengths running across the head between 6 and 12 o'clock. For a frame with 16 mains, I measure off 8 lengths and then fold that back on itself to effectively double that length - the equivalent of 16 mains. That's exactly enough to do the mains and reach my tensioner with no more than several inches left over at each end.

Now let's say this frame has 19 crosses. I measure out 9 lengths of string running across the hoop between 3 and 9 o'clock plus another half length. The 9 lengths doubled gives me 18 crosses and the extra half added in gives me the 19th when it's all doubled back on itself. When in doubt for measuring the mains or the crosses, I'll just add an extra foot. No big deal compared with coming up short and wasting that entire length of string.

I also have a Gamma starting clamp, so if my measurement is short by a couple of inches, I can easily use that clamp to make a bridge to my tensioner. Pretty much any competent stringer should have one of these, so don't worry about coming up short if you use this method to pre-measure the string needed for a specific racquet.
 
#12
I remember a post that gave some formula like measure X number of mains out and X number of crosses then add a foot for enough string to tie the knot or something. Don't quote me on it.

All my racquets are the same and I know how much I need from experience so I pull 20' for mains and 18.5 feet for crosses. Angell TC95/97 18x20. This gives me enough to comfortably tie off with less than a foot waste each for mains and crosses.
 

djNEiGht

Hall of Fame
#13
Once you get your length dialed down you can prob cut it even shorter should you or your stringer have another starting clamp that you can use as a bridge. I do this most often for my 2 piece stringing...usually as a life saving device :rolleyes:
 
#14
I've always utilized my wingspan, 3 full wingspan is mains and that's with a lock out that doesn't require looping once or anything, I usually extend it a little more.crosses it's actually around 2 3/4 wingspan this is for a 16x19 yonex vcore pro 97, for over sized rackets mains would be 3 1/2 and same for crosses. Obviously my wingspan is different than everyone, but that's what these stringers used at this shop, fastest method i've used. You could buy a electronic meter that tells you how much you've pulled.
 
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