Tennis admissions scandal

sureshs

Bionic Poster
#1
https://www.huffpost.com/entry/coll...y-scandal-whos-who_n_5c87cee0e4b0fbd7661e0b01

Manuel and Elizabeth Henriquez
Manuel Henriquez is the founder and CEO of Hercules Capital, a Silicon Valley investment firm. According to Bloomberg, he earned an estimated $8.2 million in 2017.
The indictment alleges that the couple used the scheme “on four separate occasions” to help their two daughters cheat on the exams. They also participated in Singer’s company’s athletic recruiting scheme, bribing the head coach of tennis at Georgetown University and falsely portraying their elder daughter as a highly ranked high school tennis player.
In reality, the indictment notes that “at her best, she appears to have ranked 207th in Northern California in the under-12 girls division, with an overall win/loss record of 2-8.”
 
#5
From 'The Georgetown Voice', addressing former tennis coach Gordie Ernst's involvement, "The indictment alleges that between 2012 and 2018, Ernst accepted more than $2.7 million in bribes. In return, Ernst allegedly “designated at least 12 applicants as recruits for the Georgetown tennis team, including some who did not play tennis competitively, thereby facilitating their admission to Georgetown.”
 

ClarkC

Hall of Fame
#7
It seems that coaches were taking bribes to claim to the admissions department that a certain player was a high-level athlete in the coach's sport. That makes sense. Only the opinion of the relevant coach would matter to admissions.

But that means the coach was definitely not fooled by false claims made by some parents. If so, he would not need to be bribed. The Yale women's soccer coach was one of those indicted, and the specific allegation was that he told admissions that certain students were worthy of scholarships due to athletic ability. In one case, the girl had never played soccer.

Coaches know their own sports. The bogus quote to the contrary, no, coaches did not think that kids who never played their sport were worthy of scholarships.
 
#9
Where? I call B.S. due to possessing common sense. We will see. No coach was fooled. That's why they had to be bribed.
Not sure how anyone can claim such a thing with a straight face. One of the coaches was paid 400k to get a kid in that never played on the team and received a 1.5 million dollar thank you bonus once the person enrolled.

They didnt just know. Their entire job was getting that done.
 
#11
Besides the two coaches indicted yesterday, also indicted was the IMG Academy's Director of college entrance exam preparation, a former Harvard tennis alum. It is absolutely appalling -- this scandal took spots away from deserving hard working talented kids.
 
#13
This scandal is absolutely disgusting... Some people work their butts off to get to where they are, and maybe not where they deserved to be, but if you've got enough money, the rules don't apply... I hope that the ax is swung hard for these people!
 

sureshs

Bionic Poster
#14
By admitting these students, the University will get donations for generation after generation and use that money to help poor students. What is wrong with that? That is how trickle down economics works.
 
N

Nashvegas

Guest
#15
Did the schools take a look at the teams after the kids were admitted and ask why all these “recruits” weren’t playing?
 
#16
I hope the legit players on the rosters at these schools are not affected. We knew some of the Georgetown players-5 stars, strong academically too-nice kids and families. Since only the coach knew of the crime and the fake players never played, I hope the schedule, future playoffs, etc of the true players are not cut or changed. The Georgetown team I assume is mostly American kids who received no athletic scholarships-they worked and played hard and hopefully wont be penalized for their coach's crime. The Texas team is mostly international and probably rely heavily on athletic scholarships. Wonder how NCAA will respond. NCAA can't cut or take away scholarships from the team that doesnt have them but could hurt Texas. Hope only the coaches reap the consequences and the innocent players can just play...
 

sureshs

Bionic Poster
#17
I wonder if any of the kids who got in knew what was going on. The articles say some did not know. But others must have. How much blame, if any, should be put on the kids who knew?
 
#18
I wonder if any of the kids who got in knew what was going on. The articles say some did not know. But others must have. How much blame, if any, should be put on the kids who knew?
Whether or not the student was aware of the corruption (which will be difficult to prove), the student should be expelled if his legitimate academic record would not normally qualify for admission, based on GPA, test scores, extracurriculars, and legitimate mitigating factors. Under no circumstances should an unqualified student get to hold onto a coveted seat that was attained through corruption.

If the student was unaware of the corruption (again, difficult to prove), and if his academic record would normally qualify for admission, then consideration should be given to preserving enrollment.

Finally, if the student was qualified but aware of the manipulation, he should be expelled for submitting a fraudulent application.

Ultimately, it seems unlikely that many of these students would qualify for admission under normal guidelines… otherwise, their parents would not likely have invested tens or hundreds of thousands of dollars into this scheme.

Ugly episode of greed, corruption, and entitlement. Tough on these kids for sure.
 
#19
I wonder if any of the kids who got in knew what was going on. The articles say some did not know. But others must have. How much blame, if any, should be put on the kids who knew?
How in the world would a student not know that someone else was taking their admissions tests?

How in the world would a student not know when they are being "recruited" to play a sport they dont even play?

BS

They all knew 100%

They should all be arrested for fraud too
 
#20
I think a lot of noise will be made about this for a few weeks to settle the "base." Seems kind of funny to me that this is such a big deal while the really rich buy a building, give a huge gift directly to the uni or family rep gets the offspring in. Looks to me that what really got folks irritated is that "tawdry" middle men took a cut and that the "really rich" were undermined by these "econo" admissions cheaters.
 
#21
I've heard that tennis coaches take kickbacks from agents of some foreign players to get them on a team. Not for academic reasons....legitimate players. But my understanding is that some of these coaches that take only or mostly foreign players are getting kickbacks from the agents that are representing the players. I'm sure it happens for American players too. This stuff isn't new.
 
#22
How in the world would a student not know that someone else was taking their admissions tests?

How in the world would a student not know when they are being "recruited" to play a sport they dont even play?

BS

They all knew 100%

They should all be arrested for fraud too
There are a number of ways the students might not have known. For example: if the student took the test and then the completed student test was exchanged for a different completed test before being submitted for scoring.
 
#23
I think a lot of noise will be made about this for a few weeks to settle the "base." Seems kind of funny to me that this is such a big deal while the really rich buy a building, give a huge gift directly to the uni or family rep gets the offspring in. Looks to me that what really got folks irritated is that "tawdry" middle men took a cut and that the "really rich" were undermined by these "econo" admissions cheaters.
There isnt a problem with that per se

That is a transparent process with essentially well known rules. You are also not committing tax fraud in the process (with shell charities) and you are not committing academic fraud in the process.
 
#26
You are also not committing tax fraud in the process (with shell charities) and you are not committing academic fraud in the process.
I knowingly neglected mentioning the tax issues but I am thinking that although no academic fraud may be being committed, "bumped" prospective students may have much higher academic achievement/potential than the offspring of major "gifters" per se. Right off the top of my head I am visualizing a former President and the son in law of a current President. I suspect the "value in kind" must be weighed during the admissions process where economics bump up against academic morality.
 
#27
I knowingly neglected mentioning the tax issues...
I think DOJ has it covered. (y)

Tax Fraud Conspiracy:

"Beginning around 2013, Singer allegedly agreed with certain clients to disguise bribe payments as charitable contributions to the KWF, thereby enabling clients to deduct the bribes from their federal income taxes. Specifically, Singer allegedly instructed clients to make payments to the KWF in return for facilitating their children’s admission to a chosen university. Singer used a portion of that money to bribe university athletic coaches to designate the children as student athletes. Thereafter, Masera or another KWF employee mailed letters from the KWF to the clients expressing thanks for their purported charitable contributions. The letter stated: “Your generosity will allow us to move forward with our plans to provide educational and self-enrichment programs to disadvantaged youth,” and falsely indicated that “no good or services were exchanged” for the donations. Many clients then filed personal tax returns that falsely reported the payment to the KWF as charitable donations."

https://www.justice.gov/usao-ma/pr/...dmissions-scam-alleged-exam-cheating-athletic
 
Last edited:
#28
Athletes should not be held to a lower academic standard than regular students but they typically are. I was at USC at the same time as Clowney. I spoke to him multiple times or at least tried to. Dude was dumber than a box of rocks but he ran fast and hit hard. He's a millionaire and I'm just some dude talking on a message board. Schools regularly take athletes that aren't up to their standards for various reasons. Typically some connection to the university. I'm not even upset about them using their money to get their kids into school, I'm just curious why they did it the way that they did. Why pick those Universities? If you're hyper wealthy, why do your kids need college anyway? Like the one girl from southern cal. Her mom (full house) paid for her to go to school. She's already making a million a year being an instagram influencer. What does she need a degree for? She lost all of her endorsements and will lose her income because they cheated to get her into school she didn't actually need to be financially successful. For many of these people, the connections they have would allow their kids to be successful with community college degrees. The fact that these peoples kids aren't actually intelligent enough to go to good schools on their academic merits is impressive on it's own. They had all the resources in the world to provide an excellent early education and didn't bother with it.
 

sureshs

Bionic Poster
#29
How in the world would a student not know that someone else was taking their admissions tests?

How in the world would a student not know when they are being "recruited" to play a sport they dont even play?

BS

They all knew 100%

They should all be arrested for fraud too
They were minors and doing it on the advice of their parents. The situation is legally totally different. The usual expectation is that children listen to their parents.
 

jmnk

Hall of Fame
#30
Athletes should not be held to a lower academic standard than regular students but they typically are. I was at USC at the same time as Clowney. I spoke to him multiple times or at least tried to. Dude was dumber than a box of rocks but he ran fast and hit hard. He's a millionaire and I'm just some dude talking on a message board. Schools regularly take athletes that aren't up to their standards for various reasons. Typically some connection to the university. I'm not even upset about them using their money to get their kids into school, I'm just curious why they did it the way that they did. Why pick those Universities? If you're hyper wealthy, why do your kids need college anyway? Like the one girl from southern cal. Her mom (full house) paid for her to go to school. She's already making a million a year being an instagram influencer. What does she need a degree for? She lost all of her endorsements and will lose her income because they cheated to get her into school she didn't actually need to be financially successful. For many of these people, the connections they have would allow their kids to be successful with community college degrees. The fact that these peoples kids aren't actually intelligent enough to go to good schools on their academic merits is impressive on it's own. They had all the resources in the world to provide an excellent early education and didn't bother with it.
so to make it clear - what those parents did was obviously wrong That being said there's nothing wrong with having "Athletes [...] be held to a (slightly) lower academic standard than regular students". Being a great athlete at a given sport requires years of training, dedication, self-discipline, etc. Excelling at sport is no different than excelling at piano, debate team, science fairs, etc. If one thinks it is easy/easier to be an athlete perhaps one tries to train for hours a day, 4-5 days a week, and still have pretty good academic record. In other words if a student A has like 33ACT and qualifies for like state math competition, while student B has 30ACT and is a blue chip/5-star tennis senior - I have no problems with treating them exactly the same as far as admission goes. You could easily argue that if student B spent teh time on studying and not on tennis practice he would have likely gotten 33 as well.

And you do not want to have a student body where everyone is good at just science/english/studying. You want people that excel at various aspects of life - and athletic is one of those aspects.

The other point is that kids that got admitted via those side doors are not necessarily 'not intelligent enough' to get admitted on its own. The admission to top schools is so competitive that at some point you have a pool of students that are all qualified and who gets in is essentially a lottery. Likely all of those kids were good enough to be in that 'lottery' pool, the bribes just got them picked from that pool. Which is also why none of these kids likely ever had problem academic wise while at those schools - they are intelligent enough to handle the academics. I'm sure there are exceptions.

Again, not that I'm defending anyone, just some folks do not realize what it takes to get admitted to those schools.
 
#31
I've heard that tennis coaches take kickbacks from agents of some foreign players to get them on a team. Not for academic reasons....legitimate players. But my understanding is that some of these coaches that take only or mostly foreign players are getting kickbacks from the agents that are representing the players. I'm sure it happens for American players too. This stuff isn't new.
If any of the coaches are getting kickbacks on foreign players, rest assured that they are not the kind of players that would make an impact on any college team. It's so competitive for the good foreign players that no kickbacks are needed.
 
Top