Tennis training at home

Overdrive

Legend
Huh, interesting. The problem is that the player comes from money and is living in a location where tennis is widely popular. The climate is a factor as well. There is a reason why the USTA training center is located in Bocan Raton, FL..

EDIT: Not exactly a 'problem' per se, just stating that some people are fortunate enough to do this.

I would like to see a comparison of how much money would cost between this 'personal private coaching' and the academy method..
 
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Mongolmike

Hall of Fame
Reminds me a lot of the Todd Marinovich story. If you are not familiar with it...

http://si.com/vault/article/magazine/MAG1127063/2/index.htm

From another article....

"He has never eaten a Big Mac or an Oreo or a Ding Dong. When he went to birthday parties as a kid, he would take his own cake and ice cream to avoid sugar and refined white flour. He would eat homemade catsup, prepared with honey. He did consume beef but not the kind injected with hormones. He ate only unprocessed dairy products. He teethed on frozen kidney and liver. When Todd was one month old, Marv was already working on his son's physical conditioning. He stretched his hamstrings. Pushups were next. Marv invented a game in which Todd would try to lift a medicine ball onto a kitchen counter. Marv also put him on a balance beam. Both activities grew easier when Todd learned to walk. There was a football in Todd's crib from day one. "Not a real NFL ball," says Marv. "That would be sick; it was a stuffed ball."

All in all, suffice it to say that things did not end well for Todd. Played college football at USC, drafted in 1991, out of the NFL in 1993. Substance abuse issues, homelessness, rehabs, thefts, jail time....
 

Avles

Hall of Fame
He seems like a good kid, I hope he succeeds. I wonder if his plans include college tennis or if he's thinking of going straight to the professional circuit?
I imagine that he and his parents are hoping he'll go pro directly, with college as a fallback plan.

I saw part of his match in the Eddie Herr final and he looked impressive. But he's very tall for his age (5'8" I believe). I wonder if he will continue to dominate when his competition catches up to him in size.
 

GlennK

Rookie
As far as training goes, he can't get much better than one-on-one with the coach.

But what about the experience of playing different opponents? I wonder if they invite others to come play matches at their courts or is the only experience he gets is tournaments.
 

sobzJM

New User
Homeschooled university! UofPhoenix online? If he attends college it won't be to play NCAA tennis that's for sure.
 

sobzJM

New User
I had to end my quest for a Wii championship much too early. A few too many shoulder injuries while going all out...
 

goran_ace

Hall of Fame
I actually feel sorry for the kid. It's one thing to dream about being a pro athlete at 12-13 yrs old, it's another to have that as an expectation because you're parents went all in on it. Even if they would be fine if you said you can quit tomorrow if you don't like it anymore, when you grow up with that pressure you feel like you'd be letting them down. Also, the cost of this isn't just measured in dollars, this is costing him a normal childhood/teen years.
 
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Deleted member 293577

Guest
I actually feel sorry for the kid. It's one thing to dream about being a pro athlete at 12-13 yrs old, it's another to have that as an expectation because you're parents went all in on it. Even if they would be fine if you said you can quit tomorrow if you don't like it anymore, when you grow up with that pressure you feel like you'd be letting them down. Also, the cost of this isn't just measured in dollars, this is costing him a normal childhood/teen years.
This was my feeling too. The parent(s) are living their dreams through their kid. It's not like there is a shortage of tennis instruction where they live. Let the kid figure out who he is before you leverage a guilt trip on him if he wants to quit tennis.
 
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