Tennis Warehouse Playtest: Head Graphene 360+ Extreme MP/Tour

So... I went ahead and bought the Extreme Tour since I was really intrigued. I've played hit with the xt graphene version of the Extreme Pro and it was a riot. Huge power, spin and plow... truly a beast of a racquet. It was a bit much to swing with the weight, flex, and power. Felt really super stiff, but it hit a huge ball with so much spin. I've seen videos of the Tour version and I know at 98sqin and the weight it's not intended to have the same crazy level of power and spin as the Pro and to be more controlled... however, I was hoping it would still have some Extreme DNA in it.

These are my early impressions as I've only played with it twice and played one set of doubles. Stock weight it has decent stability, but like everyone has been saying... it needs a little fattening in the weight category. I originally strung it up with Tour Bite soft 16L at 53lbs... big mistake. The racquet is not harsh and plays pretty comfortable, but at that tension the stringed was pretty firm and low powered. Sweetspot is small and low in the head... top 1/3 of the racquet was dead... really dead. If you hit the sweetspot it had good to decent power and spin. You have to really crank up the RHS or really connect on the sweetspot to get some Wow shots.

Even thought the string and tension was a bad choice for me I still felt it had potential. After the first hit I put in a 16ga natural gut in the mains at 52lbs and 4G rough at 48lbs in the cross. Still testing this, but this was a much better set up right away. Sweetspot opened up, top third is of the face is still not lively, but it's not dead like with the Tour Bite was. I'm still playing with weight, but I did try tail weighting with 12 grams of tungsten. With overgrip and dampener I was at 11.3oz... add the tail weight and it was 11.7. Played much better in my opinion, but I'm going to change the weight around.. spread it out more with some at the tip to get a little more plow. I think this racquet takes weight pretty well so far.

So is it Extreme... in short no. At some point I'm going to try a mid 40's full bed of poly like 4G rough or ALU Power to really tap more power and try to open the stringed a little bit more. If you nail the sweetspot you can hit some very nice controlled power shots with spin. The string bed is different from anything I've seen before. There is some nice power to be had, but you need to hit the sweetspot. There is some good spin potential, but to get anything close to what looked like a shot from an Extreme stick needs good contact... even then it's controlled but very good. If you're not on the sweet spot it's a very control oriented racquet. Flat hitters should have no problem with this stick as you don't get any launching that I've found yet.

Ground strokes it's very predictable with a medium to medium low launch angle... can be improved with lower tensions and thinner gauge strings. Power is low to medium. If you can extract the power from this it is there and can be potent. Spin is decent and can be good, but hard to get extreme levels of spin. Slices I can't really comment on, but seems okay but lacking some bite due again to needing more weight in the hoop.

On serve, flat serves lack a little oomph. It's got medium power, very controlled and good precision/placement. Unless you have serious RHS here's where you'll really want some more tip weight to get some added plow for power. Second serves this racquet really shined... very nice spin especially kickers... probably because the best kickers you need to hit low in the string bed where the Sweetspot on this thing is and that seems to really activated the string movmement tech in this racquet. Interesting note about the string layout... the two middle mains have a decent gap, but the next two mains out are closer... from there the gap widens a bit again to what the middle main gap is and stays about that wide or more as you move out. I mention this because I really noticed how differently the racquet reacted between flat and spin serves. Precision and control on the flat, but surprising spin on the spin serves. Never really experienced anything quite like it to be honest. I was really impressed with this.

Volleys felt nice and solid especially for it's weight. Some instability, but nothing terrible or unexpected in stock form. Really good touch and control from then net. This racquet is very predictable and you can extract power on volleys to put the away.

This is a very controlled frame and it seems odd to me that it's in the Extreme lineup, but it's still a very nice racquet. There is a lot of potential here and it does have nice power and spin, but IMO it takes some lead customization and lower string tensions to pull up the sweetspot a bit and open it up so it's more readily available. It's not harsh feeling and quite comfortable, feels rather plush. Hitting upper part of stringbed is not very rewarding, but it just feels more dead than many other modern frames... feels a bit more traditional in that respect... but no really bad vibrations when you do.

I'm still intrigued by this and will continued to play around with the weight and string tension. I think Covid and trying to figure this frame out is why a lot of testers have not really posted much in the way of reviews yet. It has a lot of good qualities and potential to be a great platform frame. Even in stock form it's a very nice frame (albeit more controlled than I was hoping).

I think the Extreme power and spin potential is hidden in this frame... not crazy levels but very good controlled levels. Those are my initial impressions. I currently play with the Gravity Pro 90% of the time (strung at 46lbs with 4G Rough) and my easy button racquet on lazy days is the Pure Aero (strung with YPTP at 50-52lbs).
 

gutfeeling

Hall of Fame
@Hit 'em clean really nice, thorough review. In my experience the trade off with flexible hoops is the upper part of the hoop can be dead especially if there is not enough mass in the hoop stock or due to manufacturing variances. Like you mentioned to remedy this you must add weight and/or decrease stringbed stiffness. After struggling with recent stiff offerings I am really enjoying the ability to flatten out and hit through the ball with this stick. I am playing mine stock at the listed spec with a 320 strung swing weight. This required 2 grams of blue tack in the butt and ultimately 3 grams of lead in the upper hoop.
 
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Yep, I agree... keep trying 305g frames hoping to find a more comfortable Radical and thought this might be it. My problem is if it’s that light but not that powerful I have a hard time developing the same rhs I can with heavier frames because I just lose control and track of the face. I like the PA because I can control with spin even though I’d not have to swing as hard and still get good power. I’m old school lumberjack and used to a little compact loop to build momentum and timing. If it doesn’t have some real raw power to make up for the loss of mass then I have to add weight.
 

dr325i

G.O.A.T.
Yep, I agree... keep trying 305g frames hoping to find a more comfortable Radical and thought this might be it. My problem is if it’s that light but not that powerful I have a hard time developing the same rhs I can with heavier frames because I just lose control and track of the face. I like the PA because I can control with spin even though I’d not have to swing as hard and still get good power. I’m old school lumberjack and used to a little compact loop to build momentum and timing. If it doesn’t have some real raw power to make up for the loss of mass then I have to add weight.
In my opinion, Little modifications turn this racket into nice Directional control Stick and controlled power, spin machine with a generous sweet spot and probably one of the easiest frames to use. A few hitting partners had similar comments — this is an ideal stick for the match in the Texas afternoon, at 104, when you’re tired and this thing just puts everything back in court and serves are so easy...
I am in the phase of having others use it to see how the ball is coming my way and how their serves change.
So far very impressed but...
 
In my opinion, Little modifications turn this racket into nice Directional control Stick and controlled power, spin machine with a generous sweet spot and probably one of the easiest frames to use. A few hitting partners had similar comments — this is an ideal stick for the match in the Texas afternoon, at 104, when you’re tired and this thing just puts everything back in court and serves are so easy...
I am in the phase of having others use it to see how the ball is coming my way and how their serves change.
So far very impressed but...
Care to share your recipe?
 

HighStepper

New User
Has anyone hit the new Extreme Tour and the Babolat Pure Drive VS and / or Aero VS? How do they compare?
I've been demoing both the Pure Drive VS and the new Extreme Tour since late last week. Out of full disclosure, I'm demoing the Extreme Tour from Tennis Warehouse - I'm not sure what the strings are, but they appear to be a silver-looking poly. I'm demoing the Pure Drive VS from a local shop, and it's got a hybrid setup with, I believe, a poly on the cross strings and multifilament on the verticals.

I'm in the process of demoing a ton of racquets (13 so far) on a quest to figure out what I really like and what to get for my next racquet. The racquets I've tried:

Head:
360+ Extreme Tour
360+ Extreme MP
Instinct MP
Gravity MP
Prestige Pro

Babolat:
Pure Drive
Pure Drive VS
Pure Aero
Pure Aero Lite
Pure Aero Team
Pure Strike 3rd Gen 16x19

Wilson:
Clash 100 Tour

Prince:
Phantom O3 100X

The two racquets currently at the top of my list are the Pure Drive VS and the new Extreme Tour, but I've been feeling a bit of elbow discomfort when hitting with the Extreme Tour, a feeling I have not experienced with the Pure Drive VS. I also felt the need to add a substantial dampener to the string bed of the Extreme Tour due to vibration.

Initially, I thought the elbow discomfort from the Extreme Tour was due to the grip size being significantly below spec - It's labeled as 4 3/8, but even with a dry torn overgrip on it, it's under 4 3/8. But I removed the tourna and added two thick Gamma overgrips to bring the grip size all the way up to 4.5 (what I normally play with), and I'm still experiencing the pain. I'm going to give it a couple days to see if time off fixes the issue, but hitting with the Pure Drive VS in the same session yesterday alleviated the pain while playing...

Anyway, there's a reason that despite the discomfort, the Extreme Tour remains at the top of the list: This thing strikes a really nice balance between control and power, while allowing me to get some serious pop on kick serves and also get deep drops on groundstrokes due to solid spin access. I found the Extreme MP to be too powerful for my game, but the Tour seems to really offer a dialed back Extreme experience with more controllable power (at least for me).

I'd say that the Extreme Tour offers better control than the Pure Drive VS, with less power and similar spin. However, hitting the ball with the PDVS feels more fluid and natural, while hitting with the Extreme Tour can be harsh and jarring at times. I'm not sure if switching to a multifilament string on the Extreme Tour would fix the issues for me, but I likely won't be able to figure that out with the demo...

Anyway, I have some additional racquets left to demo: Pure Aero VS, Yonex Ezone 100 and Head Speed MP. At this point, I'm leaning towards the Pure Drive VS due to my experience with the comfort factor vs the Extreme Tour.
 

gutfeeling

Hall of Fame
@HighStepper I would give the Extreme Tour a fair shake and string it with a softer string while your arm recovers. The frame is more flexible than the PDVS and it is only a matter of time before the stiffness of the PDVS gets to you...
 

HighStepper

New User
@HighStepper I would give the Extreme Tour a fair shake and string it with a softer string while your arm recovers. The frame is more flexible than the PDVS and it is only a matter of time before the stiffness of the PDVS gets to you...
@gutfeeling Thank you for the feedback! Unfortunately, I won't have the time to do that before returning the demo. I'm not convinced that racquet flexibility is necessarily the holy grail when it comes to my arm in particular: I've been playing with a Head Ti.S2 (rated 74 RA and 6 its head heavy) for the last 15 years or so, and have never once had any elbow or arm pain. I've recently started to get a bit more competitive and decided to get a racquet that will better match my game (more control, more touch, more spin). Maybe I'll wait until TW offers Extreme Tour demos with a multifilament option.
 

HighStepper

New User
I just hit with the extreme tour again, this time without any elbow issues! I wish I had a chance to try it with softer strings, because it still does feel harsher than the Pure Drive VS (strung with Babolat addiction 17).

I’ve now had a chance to also compare it to the Ezone 100 (strung with solinco hyper g 16), Speed MP (hybrid setup - I was not a fan of this racquet, also tried it with poly strings) and Pure Aero VS (Babolat addiction 16). Before I get into this, just a little background/perspective: I'm in my mid-30s, I grew up playing tennis and taking lessons from age 5 through 15, and until the pandemic hit, I hadn't touched my racquet in about 7-8 years. That being said, I started playing 3-4 days/week about 3-4 months ago and I've definitely regained a lot of my form (being in the best shape of my life helps a lot). I'm probably a 4.0-4.5 at this point.

From a serve perspective, it’s between the Extreme Tour and the Pure Drive VS for me. I mainly use kick serves on first and slice on second. I found myself landing more serves overall with the PDVS, especially first serves - I found it forgiving, and I found myself significantly more confident in dialing up the swing speed on the second serve (might be a tell that this is my racquet).

For heavy top spin ground strokes, the Ezone actually seemed to drop in deep more than the others (I'm guessing due to more spaced out strings on a larger head), with the extreme seeming to respond just a bit more to top spin than the PDVS, but about the same as the Pure Aero VS. For slice, the Pure Drive VS took the crown for me - I think it has a lot to do with swing weight there. Even though the PDVS is rated just a gram lighter in swing weight than the Extreme Tour, I'm pretty confident that the PDVS' numbers are inaccurate and that it's significantly lower in swing weight. Tennis Spin (on YouTube) actually measured the swing weight of the PDVS and found it to be 8 points lighter than published (also found the PAVS to be 11 points lighter than published). If that's true, it would help explain why my slices with the PDVS seem stronger than with the Extreme Tour. What I will say is that with the Extreme Tour, I did feel better able to place my sliced shots where I wanted them, when making ideal contact - I was able to hit some really nice shallow slices impossible for my opponents to get to. Most of the slices I've hit with the other racquets have been deeper (but pretty easily controlled as well).

As far as comfort is concerned, I have to put the Extreme Tour at the bottom of my top 4 here. It isn’t bad, but the Yonex and the Pure VS models are just so well dampened that the stiffness doesn’t bother me one bit. Maybe the extra gram or two of the Extreme Tour gets to me? And as I mentioned in my earlier post, I did have some elbow issues early on with the Extreme Tour - just felt like I needed to muscle in more of my shots, which probably caused poor form.

Maneuverability goes to the PDVS - again, I think the swing weight is a lot lower than published. It actually feels pretty similar in maneuverability to my Ti.S2. The Extreme strangely falls at the bottom of the list here for me as well. Something about it just made it more difficult for me to move around than the others, which is very surprising based on the numbers on paper.

All-in-all, it’s going to be very tough to decide which one of these to make into my own stick. I’m more consistently solid with the PDVS, but when I hit well, my shots with the Extreme Tour seem to be my best. The Yonex is the most forgiving, and I still need a bit more time with the PAVS, but it does feel like a bit of a balance between the PDVS and Extreme Tour - although I haven't been able to get the same pop on serves that I've gotten off of the other two.

Long story short, coming from a Head Ti.S2, it's pretty clear to me that any of these options will be a massive upgrade to my game now that I've gotten more competitive. Also, if you're an advanced player who almost always hits the ball with the sweet spot of your racquet, the Extreme Tour might be great for you. If not, you might have a similar experience to me.
 

TennisHound

Legend
Racquet received: 360+ Extreme MP
String and tension used for test: Head Sonic Pro .16 at 56lbs, Diadem Solstice Power.15L at 58lbs, settled on Sonic Pro strings.
Tennis experience/background: Played HS, Some college tennis, play usta leagues (lower 4.5)
Describe your playing style (i.e. serve & volley): First strike, serve & volley, semi-western grip, ohbh.
Current racquet/string setups: Pure Drive ’18, Head Sonic Pro .16 @ 58lbs
How many hours did you play with the racquet? Approx. 20, about 4 doubles matches, 2 singles matches, hitting sessions, and ball machine.

Comments on racquet performance:
-Groundstrokes:
From the baseline, I had no problem getting depth and more spin than my usual Pure Drive if I generated enough racquet head speed (rhs). If I had time to get the racquet into position, swung early enough, and timed everything right, I was rewarded with a very generous and powerful sweet spot, with heavy spin and depth. As I began playing and hitting with it, I tried to work out the proper grip, racquet swing path, and contact point, to control the power and ball trajectory. With time, I could probably reign it in, but as of now, I have yet to find a comfortable technique on groundstrokes with the 360+ EMP. The stability of the racquet made high balls easier to hit and absorbed pace with no problem (either backhand or forehand) and the racquet had zero instability. While I was able to hit a heavy shot using a large looping stroke, the head heaviness made flicking the wrist or hitting a passing shot very difficult, since the racquet demands a large looping swing. Again, when I had time to get the racquet in position on groundies, I was able to take advantage of the spin and power. As I hit more singles and warmups, I was able to dial in the control within roughly 3 feet or so, and about that much on net clearance. Gauging depth control was the biggest problem for me. Timing and setup wasn’t as necessary when standing still and hitting a neutral groundstroke, but when running and hitting, I had to make a conscious effort to allow for large margin of error. Even so, I had to focus while just hitting or I would be late, and the ball would fly. I had trouble with consistency on slices, both forehand and backhand, and I just couldn’t seem to dial it in. Most of these floated long.

-Serves:
I was able to hit heavy serves, plain and simple. I had to adjust my toss more in front, but I gained a significant amount of speed and spin. I had a little trouble on second serves with gauging depth or getting enough rhs. The serves weren’t as accurate as my PD or 360 PMP, but these issues were minor, and the extra spin and pace made up for it, especially on hard courts. Oddly enough, the racquet performed better with tighter strings, especially on topspin serves. Once the strings began to loosen, spin serves were harder to control and I had several double faults. Even so, this is a better serving racquet than my PD, and the ball penetrated through the court better, and with less effort. Its about even with the PA on performance, but feels 100% better, especially in the upper hoop. Plus the 360+EMP doesn’t feel as fat as the PA.

-Volleys:
Volleys were excellent. Handling hard returns at the net were a breeze, due to the stability, and the head shape helps. For some reason, I was able to get the racquet into position easily at net, regardless of the SW. I did have some trouble controlling slower balls, such as mid-court volleys, or floater balls, but these were few and far between. The wide string pattern didn’t seem to affect control on volleys. It wasn’t as stable or controlled as the 360 PMP, but it had more power, especially on stab volleys (catching returns down the line) and stretching. Low volleys were easier to handle with the lighter weight (than the PMP) and more stability (than the PD). Lower volleys were the bright spot for this racquet. I hit a few lower volleys that had me wondering how I hit such a great shot. Making the first volley after the split step was very easy with this racquet, and the wide string pattern (in this instance) helped get it over the net.

-Serve returns:
While I struggled with groundstrokes and excelled on volleys, returns were somewhere in between. The stability helped the most on high backhand slice returns, and high forehand returns. For some reason, I had trouble coming over the ball and hitting topspin or flat on my backhand returns. Consequently, I had trouble blocking or hitting slice returns on my forehand. I hit some great blocked/slice fh returns but they were consistently about 3 feet wide of where I was aiming (granted, it was on hard serves on a fast hard court). Slower serves gave me some problems with control, mainly controlling the depth. It was similar to the Prince 93P 14x18, where I wasn’t exactly sure what was going to happen when I hit the ball. Usually, I had the right grip and swingpath, but I wasn’t totally sure until I made contact. This caused me to hit late most of the time. But if I stepped in and took the ball early, it wasn’t as big of a problem.

Basic results:
I won a hard hitting 4.5 doubles match (18+). I lost a singles match against a player I have beaten twice but won another singles match against a 4.0 level player. I was losing a doubles match against slower paced players (older 4.5s) then switched to my PD and pulled the match out (not sure if it was the racquet since I was tired and not playing my best, but the SW and lack of control reared its ugly head). I won another easy doubles match and a mixed doubles match, but around the 4.0 level.

General reaction/comments on overall performance:
From the first hit, the racquet felt non-harsh, soft and powerful. I noticed the slightly head heavy feeling and was reminded of past Extreme MP’s (EMP) I’ve tried. This Extreme was significantly softer than previous iterations. The 360+ did its job. In fact, the whole racquet seemed like a sweet spot, even towards the upper part of the hoop. The combination of the wide string pattern (over 3/8” wide at its tightest point. Its very close to the Prince 93P 14x18) combined with the high swingweight (SW) and large oval head, created control problems that I was unable to work out. The wide string pattern needs rhs to work, and allow the spin to keep the ball in, while the high SW slows the rhs down creating control issues and balls flying. When the strings were fresh and tight, it was possible to gain some ball control, but as soon as the strings loosened, so did the control. I tried hard to make this my current racquet, but the string pattern is just too wide.

If the racquet had about 2 pts more HL balance, and the string pattern was slightly tighter in the middle, this would be one of the hottest selling racquets available.

Scores:
Overall 82
Groundstrokes 76
Volleys 89
Serves 82
Returns 82
Power 90
Control 70
Maneuverability 75
Stability 88
Comfort 88
Touch/Feel 87
Topspin 80
Slice 75
 
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taydbear7

Semi-Pro
Racquet received: Head Graphene Extreme 360+ MP
String and tension used for test: The first couple of weeks I used Head Lynx Tour and strung them 54 in the mains and 52 in the crosses. I cut that out and used a full bed of Gosen Sidewinder 17g at 48.
Tennis experience/background: I’ve been only been playing for the last couple of years after a long hiatus of raising two boys. I’ve played in high school and now started to really pick up the pace for lost time.
Describe your playing style (i.e. serve & volley): I’m an aggressive net player in doubles. When I’m playing singles, I use every opportunity to come to the net whether it’s serve and volley or chip and charge. I don’t like long rallies because quite frankly I’m too old for that (in my eyes anyway).
Current racquet/string setups: My stick was the Head Graphene 360 Extreme Pro
How many hours did you play with the racquet? I played approximately 20+ hours with Head Lynx Tour and have played 6 hours with Gosen Sidewinder. I've played two singles matches, 6 doubles matches and a mixed doubles match with a couple of hitting sessions in between.

Comments on racquet performance:

-Groundstrokes:
I was able to generate depth on a consistent basis. I’m a flat hitter and was able to pound the ball close to the line repeatedly during rallies. I have a one hand backhand and it’s not as flat as my forehand, but I was able to generate some nice spin especially on my cross court. When I want to generate some spin on my forehand, I was able hit some pinpoint accuracy on these. I surprised my opponents and myself regarding this on multiple occasions. On short shots where I’m able to move towards the net I’ve been able to hit the ball right in the corner whether it’s down the line or cross courts. I’m very impressed with that department. I will say the only struggles I had with it is when my opponents hit a nice shot where it kicks up to my backhand, I struggled to slice it back deep to the baseline. It tends to die in the middle of the court setting up an easy winner for my opponent.

-Serves: I have to say this is probably the least favorite thing about this racquet. I didn’t get the pop that I normally get with my Extreme Pro. The kick serve wasn’t there either. Both strings just don’t make the “pop” noise that I’m use hearing. I might have to go with a guy/poly to see if it changes but I have to say this was a slight downgrade from the Pro. When I hit it down my serve to my opponents backhand they are unable to return it most of the time but with this racquet they at least can get it back and dump into the net. It feels like it doesn’t have the extra power.

-Volleys: I have to say this is a major improvement from the Pro. The maneuverability is exceptional for directional changes. I’m an aggressive net player and this suits my game perfectly. When I was playing with the Pro, I struggled mighty and it seems like the ball hits the frame every time, but I didn’t’ experience that here with the racquet. Several of my opponents have commented how whippy my backhand volley was. They said they were impressed by how fast that racquet moves and makes the volley looks effortless. Drop shots were a thing of beauty where it just dies after clearing the net. My opponents say it looks effortless on my part (even though I had to time everything perfectly).

-Serve returns: When I was using Lynx the strings were springy and the return was long on a few occasions. When I used Sidewinder, it was a noticeable difference. I had nice depth on multiple occasion. The times where my opponents struggled with their serve and just want to get the serve in, I did a couple drop shots or slice it out wide. The racquet had a nice touch regarding that aspect. I usually play the ad side in doubles and was able to generate spin to keep the ball away from the net person and was able to drill some nice crosscourt to the returner which allows me to approach the net.

General reaction/comments on overall performance:
I own the Graphene 360 and 360+ Extreme and below is how I rate their performance on the categories above:
Groundstrokes: I would lean slight towards the 360+ based on how consistent my backhand was and how I get more depth during rallies. The 360+ spin is slightly better though both are exceptional spin machine. I feel like the 360 probably has some power but by a hair.
Serves: I would lean towards the 360 but by a slim margin. My kick serves had a little more bite to it than the 360+. The 360 also had more movement as well.
Volleys: The 360+ by a wide margin. Like I mentioned above I noticed improvement in drop shots and volleys because of the maneuverability of the racquet. I was able to just whip the racquet and put away shots easier than the 360.
Serve returns: I would rate this as even maybe the 360+ with a slim edge. Both racquets have outstanding depth on the returns but the 360+ has a little more edge in the approach shot.


Thanks TW for the opportunity. If I had to make this a better racquet I would say it probably needs more weight in the handle (the 360 needs it too) and probably some lead at the 10 and 2. I love it so much that when I get that stimulus check I will be buying another one. The paintjob is a major upgrade over the bright neon yellow and I’m glad they made the grip yellow. I've posted several pictures earlier in the thread if you want to compare the two racquets. The racquet plays softer than the stiffness level would indicate. I didn't encounter any arm, elbow, or shoulder issues with this racquet.

Edit to add the scores:

Scores:
Overall 88
Groundstrokes 82
Volleys 90
Serves 78
Returns 80
Power 84
Control 78
Maneuverability 83
Stability 85
Comfort 88
Touch/Feel 84
Topspin 83
Slice 78
 
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TennisHound

Legend
My test with the 360+ EMP is still ongoing, since I like the way this racquet feels. Its got more power than my PD and softer than most powerful racquets.
 

cd3768

Rookie
Yes let’s call these the EMP and ET hahaha
Hitting with the EMP now and am preferring it because it offers more power and spin than my 360 Speed Pro


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

chicubs

Rookie
I currently use the G360 version of the Extreme Pro after using the Head Youtek Prestige Pro (mostly) for 10ish years. I decided to give the G360+ Extreme Tour a go because while I like the Extreme Pro, it's extremely hard to accurately flatten out the ball on both wings. Plus, the feel is so-so. Genuinely fun to play with though thanks to the access to spin and power plus stability.

Anyway, the Extreme Tour is basically what everyone is saying about it. The G360+ feel is there (a big improvement over G360). Broad strokes, you can tell it's from the same stuff as Gravity Pro. It is really underpowered in the demo string setup. Demo was 53lbs with Lynx Tour. Regular Lynx at a lower tension would probably make more sense. My opponent immediately noticed the lack of power on my shots albeit the control was so much higher. Again, like everyone is saying, the stability isn't great plus it's not the best at net and slices.

Definitely could use a tad higher swingweight and a little more static weight and then it could really be the perfect in-between for me between the extreme pro and the head prestige pro. (I was switching from the PP because I was looking for a little more forgiveness.)

I'm not really a huge fan of customizing my racquets since I'm lazy AF but i think some racquet nerds would really love playing around with this thing haha. TBH, though, I'm a little surprised Head didn't make those adjustments to begin with considering it's a "tour" version and the pro version isn't even coming out in the US.
 

vsbabolat

G.O.A.T.
I currently use the G360 version of the Extreme Pro after using the Head Youtek Prestige Pro (mostly) for 10ish years. I decided to give the G360+ Extreme Tour a go because while I like the Extreme Pro, it's extremely hard to accurately flatten out the ball on both wings. Plus, the feel is so-so. Genuinely fun to play with though thanks to the access to spin and power plus stability.

Anyway, the Extreme Tour is basically what everyone is saying about it. The G360+ feel is there (a big improvement over G360). Broad strokes, you can tell it's from the same stuff as Gravity Pro. It is really underpowered in the demo string setup. Demo was 53lbs with Lynx Tour. Regular Lynx at a lower tension would probably make more sense. My opponent immediately noticed the lack of power on my shots albeit the control was so much higher. Again, like everyone is saying, the stability isn't great plus it's not the best at net and slices.

Definitely could use a tad higher swingweight and a little more static weight and then it could really be the perfect in-between for me between the extreme pro and the head prestige pro. (I was switching from the PP because I was looking for a little more forgiveness.)

I'm not really a huge fan of customizing my racquets since I'm lazy AF but i think some racquet nerds would really love playing around with this thing haha. TBH, though, I'm a little surprised Head didn't make those adjustments to begin with considering it's a "tour" version and the pro version isn't even coming out in the US.
Why didn’t you get it restrung?
 

mad dog1

G.O.A.T.
Why didn’t you get it restrung?
perhaps the answer to your question is in bold below? :-D ;)
...I'm not really a huge fan of customizing my racquets since I'm lazy AF but i think some racquet nerds would really love playing around with this thing haha. TBH, though, I'm a little surprised Head didn't make those adjustments to begin with considering it's a "tour" version and the pro version isn't even coming out in the US.
 

TennisHound

Legend
I currently use the G360 version of the Extreme Pro after using the Head Youtek Prestige Pro (mostly) for 10ish years. I decided to give the G360+ Extreme Tour a go because while I like the Extreme Pro, it's extremely hard to accurately flatten out the ball on both wings. Plus, the feel is so-so. Genuinely fun to play with though thanks to the access to spin and power plus stability.

Anyway, the Extreme Tour is basically what everyone is saying about it. The G360+ feel is there (a big improvement over G360). Broad strokes, you can tell it's from the same stuff as Gravity Pro. It is really underpowered in the demo string setup. Demo was 53lbs with Lynx Tour. Regular Lynx at a lower tension would probably make more sense. My opponent immediately noticed the lack of power on my shots albeit the control was so much higher. Again, like everyone is saying, the stability isn't great plus it's not the best at net and slices.

Definitely could use a tad higher swingweight and a little more static weight and then it could really be the perfect in-between for me between the extreme pro and the head prestige pro. (I was switching from the PP because I was looking for a little more forgiveness.)

I'm not really a huge fan of customizing my racquets since I'm lazy AF but i think some racquet nerds would really love playing around with this thing haha. TBH, though, I'm a little surprised Head didn't make those adjustments to begin with considering it's a "tour" version and the pro version isn't even coming out in the US.
Sounds like it just needs a little weight up top.
 

vsbabolat

G.O.A.T.
Racquet received: Graphene 360+ Extreme Tour
String and tension used for test: Tecnifibre NRG2 @ 55lbs

Tennis experience/background: former ranked competitive junior player, former ranked men’s open, played ITF futures, and recently had been ranked nationally in age division tennis

Describe your playing style (i.e. serve & volley): I play an all court game. My strength is my forehand that I try to use to dictate the point and move forward looking to end the point at the net.

Current racquet/string setups: currently I’m using HEAD Graphene 360+ Prestige MP and PT57A. I have no problem switching back and forth between the two. The feel is very close.

How many hours did you play with the racquet? I played 8 hours of hitting, drilling, and doubles play.

Comments on racquet performance:
-Groundstrokes: I was really impressed with the precision of the ground. The launch angle was very similar to my Prestige and gave good power. To be honest I was expecting much more power and a lot less control. Felt comfortable and confident in both wings with Extreme Tour.
-Serves: would have liked a little bit more weight while serving. But was able to hit good kick serves and slice serves. When I hit the flat one would have liked more mass so it would have been a little heavier.
-Volleys: I would have felt more comfortable with heavier racquet while volleying. But you do get good power to punch the volleys away. I was playing doubles and having problems adjusting to the weight and was putting my volleys on my opponents racquet for a little bit.
-Serve returns: this where I enjoyed the lighter weight. I could get a head of the serve and hit it easily cross court. The racquet has great stability. I found when I was stretched I could get the ball back in play. Make my opponent hit one more ball. Good things can happen.
General reaction/comments on overall performance: I was impressed with the feel, with the precision/control, and stability. I feel like this is a good modern player’s racquet to compete with Strike 98 and Ezone 98. Always the biggest thing for me when hitting with a new racquet is do I like the feel. While it feels a little stiffer then what I play with the feel was very comfortable with good feed back. I gave it to a family member to hit with and they liked it so much I could not get the racquet back so that ended my play test.
 

dr325i

G.O.A.T.
Racquet received: Graphene 360+ Extreme Tour
String and tension used for test: Tecnifibre NRG2 @ 55lbs

Tennis experience/background: former ranked competitive junior player, former ranked men’s open, played ITF futures, and recently had been ranked nationally in age division tennis

Describe your playing style (i.e. serve & volley): I play an all court game. My strength is my forehand that I try to use to dictate the point and move forward looking to end the point at the net.

Current racquet/string setups: currently I’m using HEAD Graphene 360+ Prestige MP and PT57A. I have no problem switching back and forth between the two. The feel is very close.

How many hours did you play with the racquet? I played 8 hours of hitting, drilling, and doubles play.

Comments on racquet performance:
-Groundstrokes: I was really impressed with the precision of the ground. The launch angle was very similar to my Prestige and gave good power. To be honest I was expecting much more power and a lot less control. Felt comfortable and confident in both wings with Extreme Tour.
-Serves: would have liked a little bit more weight while serving. But was able to hit good kick serves and slice serves. When I hit the flat one would have liked more mass so it would have been a little heavier.
-Volleys: I would have felt more comfortable with heavier racquet while volleying. But you do get good power to punch the volleys away. I was playing doubles and having problems adjusting to the weight and was putting my volleys on my opponents racquet for a little bit.
-Serve returns: this where I enjoyed the lighter weight. I could get a head of the serve and hit it easily cross court. The racquet has great stability. I found when I was stretched I could get the ball back in play. Make my opponent hit one more ball. Good things can happen.
General reaction/comments on overall performance: I was impressed with the feel, with the precision/control, and stability. I feel like this is a good modern player’s racquet to compete with Strike 98 and Ezone 98. Always the biggest thing for me when hitting with a new racquet is do I like the feel. While it feels a little stiffer then what I play with the feel was very comfortable with good feed back. I gave it to a family member to hit with and they liked it so much I could not get the racquet back so that ended my play test.
Beat me to it.
and yes, that forehand!
 
Extreme Tour is just not working for me. I still have more of everything with the GPro in literally every category. I wanted to like the Tour, it feels nice at contact, swings easy and seems to have some decent power and spin, but it just wasn’t the same. Even my opponents immediately commented on how my shots had lost some pace and heaviness. I tried adding weight to the hoop and it improved things, but I not enough and stability still lacked somewhat on slices and most of all at net. Racquet would really twist on me on slices if I missed the sweet spot and with the tenderness in my elbow it was not pleasant. Other than slices comfort was not an issue. Adding weight at 3 and 9 helped. Racquet really swings fast and light and my best shots were my overheads. Hit some of the best overheads of my life because racquet came through so easily. My racquet was a little on the light side at 11.2oz so that didn’t help. I weighted up to 11.7 and it was better, but I felt like I still didn’t have much plow. Something about the way the ball comes off the strings... comes off too quick or feels that way. I like it when ball feels like it sits in the strings a bit. My go to rally groundstroke was not something I could find as the ball was either low and with spin or if I wanted some arc (3-6 feet over the net) I had to really go for mostly spin which meant 6+ feet over the net. The normal deep heavy topspin shot I’m used to... if I tried to hit it would just fly long for some reason and I never really felt comfortable making my normal swing.

I’m still looking for a GPro (current stick) like package in a lighter weight. I’ve been tinkering with the ET because I was hoping it would be like a more comfortable Radical Pro (a former go to stick for me), but it’s been disappointing. Finally tried the Ezone 98 2020 today and it might be what I go with. I hit the Ezone side by side with the ET and my GPro. Ezone was more comfortable and plush... to the point that when I went to hit a few with the GPro I was surprised to find that my GPro seemed to have more vibration than the Ezone. Ezone 98 for me has more power and spin than the ET. For it’s weight the Ezone really gets close the GPro. With the Ezone I could hit my normal rally ball right away without having to compensate somehow... feel and trajectories I got synced up. I was going to play around with ET a bit longer... but the EZone was so much better for me stock that it’s not worth continuing with the ET. Ezone also crushed the ET in the serve category... more power, spin, etc. The ET is a nice racquet... just doesn’t work for me or my game (4.5/5.0 aggressive baseline, like to control points from back court with hard deep topspin shots, playing a lot of doubles now as I‘m getting older, played varsity tennis in HS)

ET setups I tried
TourBite Soft @53lbs. (Not good, way too tight and lacked power and spin)
Gut (mains) @52 & 4G Rough (cross) @48 (good power and spin... a little too powerful)
YPTP @46lbs (good power & spin)

You’ll probably like the ET if...
You are used to sweetspots that are lower in the head (like more traditional racquets)
You hit a flatter, lower trajectory ball... if you like the TF40 (I did not)... you’ll probably love or hate the ET (love if you want more power, hate if require plowthrough). The way ball comes off the ET feels somewhat similar to the TF40, but ET has easily better power and spin
You have a pretty quick and compact stroke with good rhs and don’t require much plowthrough
You don’t play doubles or if you end up at net its because you’re following an attacking shot and expect a weak reply
You serve with plenty of rhs and hit a lot of spin serves

You might not like the ET if...
You tend to hit higher in the racquet face or have been spoiled with 100sq more forgiving racquets
You generate rhs with more traditional loop (bigger swing) and use gravity to help you (ET likes rhs, without it the shots can be a bit weak... lacking depth and spin)
You prefer a heavy flat first serve
You prefer racquets with some decent static weight and natural plow (you might be able to get what you want with customization)
You prefer to play racquets stock (I think it’s a must that you add weight to this frame if you play 4.5/5.0 and up)
You like the net and play with folks that hit hard shots (just twists to easily)
You like a dirty penetrating slice (again... lack of weight in the hoop area which may or may not be remedied with lead... I couldn’t find a good setup)
 

dr325i

G.O.A.T.
First, a BIG THANKS to TW for the opportunity to be a part of this Test group!

Racquet received: Graphene 360+ Extreme Tour
String and tension used for test: Initially, used it in stock form with Lynx Tour that came with, then switched to VS Touch @54 and Hawk Rough @48 (and adjusted the weight of the racket, see below)

Tennis experience/background: Been playing recreational tennis for about 40 years. Would say a solid 4.0, lower 4.5, but can hang with 5.5 just fine

Describe your playing style (i.e. serve & volley): I play an all court game. Prefer to stay on base line. Two handed BH, moderate spin FH, not shy to come to the net. My weapons are Serve (first) and 2HBH, my FH depends heavily on the racket setup. Movement was the base of my game, however, ever since the Meniscus surgery last October, my movement has suffered as I never fully recovered.

Current racquet/string setups: currently I’m using HEAD PT313.2 18x20 and PT2.0. I prefer the old school feel and plush control oriented, lower power rackets. My setup is 335g strung with OG, 32.5cm balance, 335SW. No dampener. VS Touch @54 and Hawk Rough @48. I have no problem switching back and forth between the two, although the PT2.0 has more modern feel, closer to the Extreme Tour.

How many hours did you play with the racquet? About 15 hours of hitting, drilling, and serve practice and returns against various opponents -- flat hitters, heavy spin, big servers, former D1, girl college player thinking about going pro.

Comments on racquet performance:
First, I am totally impressed with the Extreme tour easiness of use. In stock form, it was missing SW and definitely weight, when I added weight, the stick totally transformed and became much better, but in both cases it was doing the job for me... Very rarely I can switch to a 10-15g lighter stick and 15SW lower and feel comfortable and stable. The Extreme Tour is THAT!

-Groundstrokes: I was really impressed with the precision of the ground. I would characterize it as the precision of the 18x20 with the spin of 16x19. Ball pocketing is impressive. The launch angle is lower than the standard 16x19. The access to power is easy. As previously mentioned (above), to me it is an ideal racket when tired and need free power and easy access to spin, depth and control. My opponents commented that my shots felt deeper and were moving more. However, the power is well controlled. I never used an extreme line before, therefore was expecting more power or less controlled power with the Tour.
The BH slice is probably my weakest shot and with the Tour, I (re)gained the confidence on the slices and felt great. However, sometimes I use FH slices on low underpowered balls and just could not get it going with the Tour.
Drop shots were not as good as with my 313.
I changed the setup by adding about 4g @12 o'clock and adding 10g of silicone in the handle (replaced with standard buttcap). That pushed the static weight to 338g, however, the balance is still at 33cm. Not my ideal setup, however, easy to adopt and very easy to time it right. I have also changed the pallets to TK82.

Nevertheless, it does feel like it is missing some mass in the middle, therefore, my concern would be to get pushed against the heavy hitters (@vsbabolat forehand ;))

-Serves: I could not get it going in stock form and with Lynx Tour. With the adjustments and with the Hybrid setup, it is great. Again, very easy to swing and put it in and I'd say serving effectively with about 85% of effort. Kicks are kicking!

-Volleys: Stable, stable, stable! I could not believe how stable it is in stock form and how amazing it is with my adjusted setup. First day when I hit the net with the original setup, people immediately commented on the depth of my volleys. Definitely felt more comfortable at the net with the Tour vs. my standard stick.
Good feedback and good modern crisp feel of the racket allows a great touch at the net.

-Serve returns: Easy maneuverability of this racket was a big plus however, felt like heavy serves did push it a bit. Overall, still very good with deep returns with quick racket speed.

General reaction/comments on overall performance: Great feel, modern, crisp, but with that 360+ touch of classic. The precision, control, spin and stability are some of the best I've seen in a racket. The ease of use and access from any angle is impressive. Good size sweet spot, but lower in the head. Feels like I could play for hours and not get tired. I could dial back and just counter punch indefinitely or easily attack. I am not sure what to compare it to as I mainly mess with Head sticks and Blade, however, I expected the racket like this to fall more in the Radical bucket than the Extreme.
My hitting partner tried it and took it away from me. Therefore, my plan to keep it as the backup for tired days is not going to happen... Who knows, I may just get me one or two for those ugly 104F Texas afternoons, after a long, tiring week...
 
Racquet received: 360+ Extreme MP
String and tension used for test: Head Lynx Tour 1.25 (pre-strung from TW.. perhaps mid-tension?), Luxilon 4G @ 50 lbs.
Tennis experience/background: avid club 4.5 player. Play about 4-5 times a week. Apparently the only thing that might make me play less is an act of God, or a global pandemic.
Describe your playing style (i.e. serve & volley): baseliner
Current racquet/string setups: Well as a Racquetholic, a little all over the place. But prior to being selected for this play test, I had been using a Wilson N-code Six One 18x20 and a Head Graphene Prestige Rev Pro 1st gen. As far as strings go, I'm fairly loyal to Lux and Solinco.
How many hours did you play with the racquet? 12+

Comments on racquet performance: Before going into specifics, I would like to first mention that this play test was the story of two strings jobs. IMO, the new Extreme MP and Lynx Tour are not a good match... didn't work for me. The Lynx Tour is just simply too powerful for this particular racquet. This became very evident on flatter strokes.. my 2 hander. I had very low confidence on that wing, so much so I started to run around it. Which doesn't suit me, as it's my favored side. I had better results when I sliced.. I think the fact the racquet seems to have some mass in the head helped. I also had issues controlling my returns. Sometimes I like to chip or block a return, and with the Lynx it was very erratic. Serving and forehands were easier to control and effective with the LT string. Now it was not all bad news for the Lynx Tour. I did find it very comfortable, spin-friendly and seemed to have nice feel for a poly. It had a good balance of feedback and being muted enough to handle any shock. But as the test wore on, the overly powerful response became huge liability for me.. I was not playing well with it. I decided to harness things with some good old 4G.. that racquet was transformed. The following review is with the 4G.

-Groundstrokes:
Forehand: As expected this racquet absolutely shinned on the forehand wing. The sweet spot and spin window is huge. While the overall response of the racquet is powerful, the 4G allowed me enough control to at times take something off the ball in order to give me more variety. Usually I use a semi-western grip, but lately I've been experimenting using a modern Eastern grip with a straight arm and had no issues with the transition. Defensive shots can be turned into offensive ones with a flick of the wrist. The racquet's ability to generate spin and the 4G's control gave me the freedom and confidence to swing out on my forehand and go for the lines... with the Lynx Tour I had go for bigger targets.

Backhand: The 4G made the biggest impact on my 2 hander. It's my flatter stroke, but the Extreme MP's spin generation and 4G control made the ball noticeably dive at the baseline. Despite the MP's lower weight, I found enough stability to easily change the ball's direction during rally's. Slice was usually an offensive shot with this racquet. The ball would stay low and skid, but with a lot of pace. Generally I prefer a heftier stick on my 2BH, 360+ Extreme Pro anyone?

-Serves: I mean it's like cheating really. I don't have a big serve at all, but I was hitting with more pace than my usual racquets of choice. I've been pronating more on serve, and hitting down the T became a weapon. The massive sweet spot made spin serves very effective as well. I just felt on serve I had so many options.. power or placement no problem. Double faults were very low. 10 out of 10!

-Volleys: Volleys were pretty much point and shoot. The combo of maneuverability and stability kept things simple at net. I'm not much of a net player, so I don't attempt many touch volleys... so I can't say much on that. I was able to dig out quite a few half volleys at my feet with ease though.

-Serve returns: This was like a combo of groundies and volleys. The MP's maneuverability allowed me time to take fuller cuts on returns and keep my opponent honest. The point and shoot quality I found at net, helped me on chipped returns when facing a bigger serve. A shot I found very effective was the blocked return with pace down the line on my backhand wing. While returning was great with the MP, I still wouldn't mind a bit more overall weight on the racquet as with 2BH.

General reaction/comments on overall performance: Overall I had a very positive play test with the new 360+ Extreme MP. Make no mistake, this racquet is designed for the modern topspin game. While the Luxilon 4G gave me the control I desired, the racquet was most effective when hitting with spin and staying on the front foot. I had to make sure to stay in control and not get carried away and slap at the ball. When it comes to feel, I did find it rather comfortable as compared to say a Pure Drive or Aero. But it's still a tweener. It still has that crisp, somewhat muted hollow feel. For me, the only string option might be 4G. At 50 lbs, the power, spin, control and feel I'm getting is very impressive. I may even drop it a pound or two. Unfortunately, 4G may be a deal breaker for some with sensitive tendons. I simply struggled with the softer Lynx Tour. String sensitive maybe? Anyone looking at tweener style frames MUST demo this stick!

Hope my review adds to the conversation on the MP... happy to answer any questions TT'ers may have.

Big thanks to TW and Head for this awesome opportunity!

All my best.
 

mxblink

Rookie
Graphene 360+ Extreme TOUR Review

I wasn’t selected for the playtest but ended up grabbing a demo, so I thought I’d write a few thoughts to help people out here.

About me: I play at a 4.0 level. Played competitively as a junior but then fell off during college. Picked it up again after college and have been playing basically as much as I can, which is usually 2-4x a week minus the occasional drop off when things get busy. I’d like to think I have pretty solid stroke mechanics (a product of more structured training when I was a junior), but my consistency suffers mainly due to footwork/conditioning and overall lack of practice/drilling compared to how much I used to play. I’m also impatient and try to end points before I really should, but I’m working on it. I can rally with higher-level players but lose to them in matches, if that makes sense.

I play a strong semi-western forehand and a flatter 2-handed BH. Stylistically I’d call myself an aggressive baseliner - I try to stay close to the baseline and attack, and will lurch myself to the net when ahead in the point or when drawn in but otherwise typically stay back. I like to hit the ball hard and typically make major contributions to my own losses, and so I’ve been working on generally playing smarter tennis and hitting to safer targets with more margin. My main weapons are my forehand which I try and use to gradually wear down my opponent and gain an advantage in the rally, and a DTL backhand that I probably pull the trigger on more often than I should.

Racquet-wise, I’ve been on a bit of a journey over the past several years, during which my preferred racquet has gotten lighter and lighter. I was playing with the RF97 and YY TourG 330, but over time I’ve realized that the benefits of being able to obliterate the ball when in position were outweighed by the detriments of having to bring a heavy stick around when on the run/out of position, especially at the end of a long match or hitting session. My game has gotten spinnier, particularly on the forehand as I’ve worked to modernize my mechanics, and heavy sticks flatten out my strokes more than I’d like. That said, I still do enjoy a hefty swingweight (generally 330-340). Just prior to this demo I was playing with the 2020 EZone 98, weighted up to a static weight in the low 330s and a swingweight around 335.

On to the racquet. I’ve put about 15 hours in at this point. The demo came strung with Lynx Tour 16g probably around mid-tension. Wasn’t a big fan – I typically play with deader polys and found the Lynx too lively. Fortunately I was able to snap it (kind of odd actually as I don’t typically break poly), and restrung it with Confidential 1.20 at 48 lbs. Have tried a couple of other strings but at this point I’m mainly set on Confidential to be my go-to for this stick. I’ve played around with the weighting, but right now all dressed and leaded, the racquet specs out to 332g/32.7cm/336SW.

General comments: If there’s one word I could use to describe this stick, it’s reliable. This racquet provides an excellent mix of control, spin, power, and stability, and I play more consistently with it than nearly every other racquet I’ve recently tried, even at the same/similar spec. It’s also one of the rare sticks that manages to be stable without feeling clunky – even leaded up to a 336 swingweight I have had no issues with maneuverability and the sweet spot is quite generous. Part of the control and consistency comes from the racquet’s phenomenal spin potential – more than I would expect given its spec and string spacing. Maybe it’s the spin grommets? Who knows, but initially there were multiple times I would give up on points after I was sure my shot was going long, only for it to dip in at the last second. Power-wise, there is not a ton of free power, but there is power on tap if you know how to access it (no doubt the added weight helps in this regard). I haven’t ever played with the past Extremes, but I have hit a Pure Drive before, and if the PD is anything like the prototypical “Extreme” of iterations past then this new Extreme Tour is significantly lower-powered (but not underpowered).

Feel-wise, this is obviously personal but I’ve found the Extreme Tour to be a very comfortable racquet, especially for one that flexes at 65RA (I understand RA doesn’t tell the whole story, but gotta work with what we have). Not at all jarring off center. I have a sensitive wrist and have been sidelined before from harsh/stiff racquets, but I’ve been playing the Extreme Tour a lot lately without any issues. I think one of the main reasons I initially gravitated to heavy racquets was that there’s really nothing like a flexible heavy stick to dampen any bad vibes while letting you know exactly what the ball is doing. I think initially, companies added tech to light and stiff racquets (not that the Extreme Tour is really that stiff) in order to filter out bad vibrations, but in the end the tech just filtered out everything and you had no idea what was going on (I’m looking at you, Countervail). I don’t know if the tech has just improved or what, but for a lighter stick the Extreme Tour does an excellent job of letting you know what the ball is doing without any harsh feel.

Groundstrokes: This is where I think the Extreme Tour’s blend of power, control, stability, and maneuverability really shines. The typical rally ball clears the net by 3-4 feet and lands deep in the court with little effort, but if I want to mix it up with a deep roll, short angle, or low slice those are all equally accessible options. Control is easy to come by. I think that when it comes to control, there is a spectrum where some sticks have an intrinsic control that comes from (typically) a thinner beam, smaller head, tighter pattern, etc. Think your Prince 93p, Head PT 2.0, Yonex VCore 330, etc. Then there are sticks that are actually quite intrinsically powerful, where the control comes from the spin. Think about your Pure Aero, Wilson Burn, or (stereotypically) Head Extreme. The Extreme Tour gives you both, and it’s awesome. On a neutral rally ball or defensive shot I can hit with aggressive spin to both keep the ball in and increase the weight of shot. At the same time, it’s easy to flatten this racquet out and put some zip on the shot while trusting that the ball will stay in. Power-wise, it’s no Pure Drive, but as I said the power is there if you have the mechanics to unlock it. I find that my 70-80% ball is often enough to lean on someone and gradually gain the advantage in a point. Compared to my EZone, I find that the EZone actually produces a bigger (and flatter) ball, but the Extreme Tour is a much more controlled, consistent racquet in my hands that gives me a wider range of options.

Volleys: I’m not the most adept volleyer and don’t spend the most time at net, but with weight I found this racquet to be extremely stable while still retaining excellent maneuverability. It’s easy to punch volleys deep, feather a dropper, or cut a sharp angle. For whatever reason I’ve had a much easier time using this stick for picking up those awkward half volleys around the service line – probably a combination of the racquet’s stability and maneuverability. To be fair, nothing beats a heavy stick when it comes to net play, but for a lighter racquet I really have no complaints.

Serves: On flat serves there is easy power on tap but it’s not a monster. Great placement with excellent access to spin for slices and kickers. I was able to serve effectively with this racquet, but perhaps wasn’t hitting as many outright aces as I do with some of my other frames.

Returns: Great. Easy to get the racquet in position and the stability lets you block balls deep to start the point on neutral footing. Quick enough to go after the aggressive return, and powerful enough so that you don’t need to swing out of shoes to get some heat on your shot. No complaints here!

As should be pretty obvious, I really enjoyed this racquet, so much so that I picked up a couple and made the switch. I hope this review helps some other people, and of course I’m available for any questions.
 
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Boomersooner

New User
Graphene 360+ Extreme TOUR Review

I wasn’t selected for the playtest but ended up grabbing a demo, so I thought I’d write a few thoughts to help people out here=

About me: I play at a 4.0 level. Played competitively as a junior but then fell off during college. Picked it up again after college and have been playing basically as much as I can, which is usually 2-4x a week minus the occasional drop off when things get busy. I’d like to think I have pretty solid stroke mechanics (a product of more structured training when I was a junior), but my consistency suffers mainly due to footwork/conditioning and overall lack of practice/drilling compared to how much I used to play. I’m also impatient and try to end points before I really should, but I’m working on it . I can rally with higher-level players but lose to them in matches, if that makes sense.

I play a strong semi-western forehand and a flatter 2-handed BH. Stylistically I’d call myself an aggressive baseliner - I try to stay close to the baseline and attack, and will lurch myself to the net when ahead in the point or when drawn in but otherwise typically stay back. I like to hit the ball hard and typically make major contributions to my own losses, and so I’ve been working on generally playing smarter tennis and hitting to safer targets with more margin. My main weapons are my forehand which I try and use to gradually wear down my opponent and gain an advantage in the rally, and a DTL backhand that I probably pull the trigger on more often than I should.

Racquet-wise, I’ve been on a bit of a journey over the past several years, during which my preferred racquet has gotten lighter and lighter. I was playing with the RF97 and YY TourG 330, but over time I’ve realized that the benefits of being able to obliterate the ball when in position were outweighed by the detriments of having to bring a heavy stick around when on the run/out of position, especially at the end of a long match or hitting session. My game has gotten spinnier, particularly on the forehand as I’ve worked to modernize my mechanics, and heavy sticks flatten out my strokes more than I’d like. That said, I still do enjoy a hefty swingweight (generally 330-340). Just prior to this demo I was playing with the 2020 EZone 98, weighted up to a static weight in the low 330s and a swingweight around 335.

On to the racquet. I’ve put about 15 hours in at this point. The demo came strung with Lynx Tour 16g probably around mid-tension. Wasn’t a big fan – I typically play with deader polys and found the Lynx too lively. Fortunately I was able to snap it (kind of odd actually as I don’t typically break poly), and restrung it with Confidential 1.20 at 48 lbs. Have tried a couple of other strings but at this point I’m mainly set on Confidential to be my go-to for this stick. I’ve played around with the weighting, but right now all dressed and leaded, the racquet specs out to 332g/32.7cm/336SW.

General comments: If there’s one word I could use to describe this stick, it’s reliable. This racquet provides an excellent mix of control, spin, power, and stability, and I play more consistently with it than nearly every other racquet I’ve recently tried, even at the same/similar spec. It’s also one of the rare sticks that manages to be stable without feeling clunky – even leaded up to a 336 swingweight I have had no issues with maneuverability and the sweet spot is quite generous. Part of the control and consistency comes from the racquet’s phenomenal spin potential – more than I would expect given its spec and string spacing. Maybe it’s the spin grommets? Who knows, but initially there were multiple times I would give up on points after I was sure my shot was going long, only for it to dip in at the last second. Power-wise, there is not a ton of free power, but there is power on tap if you know how to access it (no doubt the added weight helps in this regard). I haven’t ever played with the past Extremes, but I have hit a Pure Drive before, and if the PD is anything like the prototypical “Extreme” of iterations past then this new Extreme Tour is significantly lower-powered (but not underpowered).

Feel-wise, this is obviously personal but I’ve found the Extreme Tour to be a very comfortable racquet, especially for one that flexes at 65RA (I understand RA doesn’t tell the whole story, but gotta work with what we have). Not at all jarring off center. I have a sensitive wrist and have been sidelined before from harsh/stiff racquets, but I’ve been playing the Extreme Tour a lot lately without any issues. I think one of the main reasons I initially gravitated to heavy racquets was that there’s really nothing like a flexible heavy stick to dampen any bad vibes while letting you know exactly what the ball is doing. I think initially, companies added tech to light and stiff racquets (not that the Extreme Tour is really that stiff) in order to filter out bad vibrations, but in the end the tech just filtered out everything and you had no idea what was going on (I’m looking at you, Countervail). I don’t know if the tech has just improved or what, but for a lighter stick the Extreme Tour does an excellent job of letting you know what the ball is doing without any harsh feel.

Groundstrokes: This is where I think the Extreme Tour’s blend of power, control, stability, and maneuverability really shines. The typical rally ball clears the net by 3-4 feet and lands deep in the court with little effort, but if I want to mix it up with a deep roll, short angle, or low slice those are all equally accessible options. Control is easy to come by. I think that when it comes to control, there is a spectrum where some sticks have an intrinsic control that comes from (typically) a thinner beam, smaller head, tighter pattern, etc. Think your Prince 93p, Head PT 2.0, Yonex VCore 330, etc. Then there are sticks that are actually quite intrinsically powerful, where the control comes from the spin. Think about your Pure Aero, Wilson Burn, or (stereotypically) Head Extreme. The Extreme Tour gives you both, and it’s awesome. On a neutral rally ball or defensive shot I can hit with aggressive spin to both keep the ball in and increase the weight of shot. At the same time, it’s easy to flatten this racquet out and put some zip on the shot while trusting that the ball will stay in. Power-wise, it’s no Pure Drive, but as I said the power is there if you have the mechanics to unlock it. I find that my 70-80% ball is often enough to lean on someone and gradually gain the advantage in a point. Compared to my EZone, I find that the EZone actually produces a bigger (and flatter) ball, but the Extreme Tour is a much more controlled, consistent racquet in my hands that gives me a wider range of options.

Volleys: I’m not the most adept volleyer and don’t spend the most time at net, but with weight I found this racquet to be extremely stable while still retaining excellent maneuverability. It’s easy to punch volleys deep, feather a dropper, or cut a sharp angle. For whatever reason I’ve had a much easier time using this stick for picking up those awkward half volleys around the service line – probably a combination of the racquet’s stability and maneuverability. To be fair, nothing beats a heavy stick when it comes to net play, but for a lighter racquet I really have no complaints.

Serves: On flat serves there is easy power on tap but it’s not a monster. Great placement with excellent access to spin for slices and kickers. I was able to serve effectively with this racquet, but perhaps wasn’t hitting as many outright aces as I do with some of my other frames.

Returns: Great. Easy to get the racquet in position and the stability lets you block balls deep to start the point on neutral footing. Quick enough to go after the aggressive return, and powerful enough so that you don’t need to swing out of shoes to get some heat on your shot. No complaints here!

As should be pretty obvious, I really enjoyed this racquet, so much so that I picked up a couple and made the switch. I hope this review helps some other people, and of course I’m available for any questions.
"Extreme"ly good review. Exact locations & amount of lead tape at each spot please? And, do your final specs include og & dampener?
 

nov

Rookie
Is the Tour stable enough for 3.5-4.0 levels?I have Gravity MP, but need to weight it up 3-4gr on 3/9 and ~10gr handle to make it stable. I would like to play Extreme tour in stock form.
 

mxblink

Rookie
Is the Tour stable enough for 3.5-4.0 levels?I have Gravity MP, but need to weight it up 3-4gr on 3/9 and ~10gr handle to make it stable. I would like to play Extreme tour in stock form.
I think there are limits to the stability you can get with a 305g racquet. Assuming you mean torsional stability, the Extreme Tour has a listed twistweight per TWU of 14.3, which objectively speaking is a pretty stable racquet for the weight. For comparison, the new EZone 98 has the same listed twistweight and is being generally held up as a stable racquet. That said the Pure Strike 16x19 has a twistweight of 14.8, and the Pure Aero is listed at 15.4, so there are definitely more stable options out there.

In the end it's all relative to what you need. TWU lists the Gravity MP as having a slightly lower twistweight vs the Extreme Tour (14.1 vs 14.3), but also a higher swingweight (323 vs 318). Meaning in stock form you may notice a tiny bit of extra torsional stability with the Extreme Tour, but you may also find the racquet getting "pushed around" more on hard shots, which some may perceive as instability.

I suspect if you needed 3-4g at 3/9 on the Gravity (an another 10g in the handle) then you may find the Extreme Tour doesn't have enough stability for your taste in stock form. Of course, no way to say for sure without trying.
 

nov

Rookie
I think there are limits to the stability you can get with a 305g racquet. Assuming you mean torsional stability, the Extreme Tour has a listed twistweight per TWU of 14.3, which objectively speaking is a pretty stable racquet for the weight. For comparison, the new EZone 98 has the same listed twistweight and is being generally held up as a stable racquet. That said the Pure Strike 16x19 has a twistweight of 14.8, and the Pure Aero is listed at 15.4, so there are definitely more stable options out there.

In the end it's all relative to what you need. TWU lists the Gravity MP as having a slightly lower twistweight vs the Extreme Tour (14.1 vs 14.3), but also a higher swingweight (323 vs 318). Meaning in stock form you may notice a tiny bit of extra torsional stability with the Extreme Tour, but you may also find the racquet getting "pushed around" more on hard shots, which some may perceive as instability.

I suspect if you needed 3-4g at 3/9 on the Gravity (an another 10g in the handle) then you may find the Extreme Tour doesn't have enough stability for your taste in stock form. Of course, no way to say for sure without trying.
Im thinking about using TW racquet match service and choose Tour with higher SW, maybe around 325. But i would like to have static weight about 305gr unstrung or overall weight with OG,dampener no more than 330gr and 5/6 HL balance.
 

gutfeeling

Hall of Fame

Racquet Received
I received the Extreme Tour. My unstrung racquet was 300 grams, 31.4 cm, and 285 swingweight. To bring it up to the listed spec I added 3 grams of lead to the hoop and 2 grams of Blu Tack to the butt. The final unstrung spec I used for the playtest was 305 grams, 31.5 cm, and 290 swingweight.

I used Solinco Tour Bite 1.20 strung at 52 lbs on my constant pull. This is my current string of choice on my current frame, the 2020 Ezone 98.

I played with the Extreme Tour in stock form for at least 10 hours spread over 5 sessions. I eventually added more weight to the hoop to bump up the strung swingweight to 330 but my review will focus on the stock playtest only.

Tennis Experience
I am a 32 year old male. I am a computer rated 4.5 USTA league tennis player. Growing up I played USTA junior tournaments. I stopped playing in high school and picked the sport back up again about 7 years ago.

I am a baseliner. My two handed backhand is stronger than my forehand. I am working on flattening out the forehand and looping it less. I am 6’4 so I have always had a relatively strong serve. Lately I have been working on playing first strike tennis and moving forward. This has required me to improve my midcourt and net games.

Racquet Performance
Stability - The Extreme Tour is as stable as you would expect a 305 gram (unstrung) and 315-320 swingweight (strung) racquet to be. Off center hits result in slight twisting which is no different than other racquets in this class. The Extreme Tour withstands pace on groundstrokes, returns, and volleys so long as you hit the ball cleanly.

Maneuverability - The Extreme Tour’s relatively low swingweight combined with its 31.5 cm balance (unstrung) makes it relatively maneuverable. This maneuverability is particularly rewarding on returns of serve and when you are on the run. Players who are sensitive to higher swingweights and more head heavy balance points will appreciate the Extreme Tour’s weight distribution especially on serves and forehands where the racquet comes through contact quickly.

Response & Feel - The Extreme Tour embodies balanced response and feedback. Full strokes and racquet head speed are rewarded with precision, predictability, and a ball that penetrates the court. The relatively dense 16x19 string pattern’s launch angle is linear. To achieve this closed string spacing Head left a noticeable amount of space surrounding the perimeter of the stringbed which helps forgive off center hits.

The Extreme Tour’s hoop and the shaft are relatively firm but have a nice flex to them that becomes more pronounced as the pace increases. The Graphene 360+ layup is muted to a degree which on the one hand absorbs shock from mishits and on the other provides enough direct feedback to gauge how the ball is coming off the stringbed.

General Reaction

In stock form the Extreme Tour will appeal to players with developed strokes that can generate their own pace and value control and comfort over power and spin. Head is making the proposition that if you want more out of the Extreme Tour you can add weight to it as needed. Advanced/stronger players will welcome the additional plow and stability. Weaker players may have to look to other offerings in the Extreme lineup to get the power, spin, and weight combination they need.

Thank you @TW Staff for the opportunity to participate in the playtest. I enjoyed the Extreme Tour so much that it is my new racquet of choice. I am happy to answer questions or provide additional feedback as needed.
 
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A_Instead

Hall of Fame
Thank you to those who took your time to read my review of the Head Graphene 360+ Extreme Tour. I hope I provided useful information that can be used in your purchase decision.
At any time, you can reach out to me for questions, additional feedback, etc.
History/Misc:
I try most rackets in the 300 gram ish category.. from most manufactures.
Some are good, some not so good… certainly subjective.. I am not trying to push my views on anyone.. our rackets are our choice…
I have a preference in manufactures.. I gravitate towards Wilson. but will play with anything as long as it performs and doesn’t hurt my wrist..
I play in organized Tennis Leagues with players with USTA ratings of 2.5 to 4.5, both male and female. I am 4.0 based on my peers feedback.
I play mainly singles, but some doubles..both mens and mixed.
My game evolves around my serve.. it sets up everything. My forehand and backhand slice are my best weapons. Volleys are improving as I am finding more success coming forward.
All court game nowadays..I win more when I get off the baseline..
I prefer std length, a textured poly at 42 lbs. 320 ish swing weight, 5 points HL, 325 ish static weight with overgrip and dampener. Mid 60 constant flex. A dampened response and always use a TW worm dampener.
Currently I am using the Chris Edwards signature model.. Tecnifibre TF40 305g strung with my go to Pros Pro Black Out 17g at 42 lbs ..

The Head Graphene 360+ Extreme Tour
I used the Head Graphene 360+ Extereme Tour for at least 40 hours since I received it… Did not restring. Did not care for the Head Lynx Tour..
Many matches, singles, doubles and just practice.
I used my Babolat Pop at times to see how it compared to my CE 40.. my numbers were comparable.
I also let a few of my friends try it as I explained the TW playtest process. 1..This enabled them to experience a racket that hasn’t been released. 2..It’s a cool factor to them.. 3..I get their feedback.. 4.. I get to experience how the racket performs against me.. 5.. Promotion for Head and most importantly TW.. ( I use my TW 9 pack bag during this playtest)

Looks: “Dynamite” (call back to those who know). The color and scheme is ones of its better attributes. It Pops.. Great looks that gets attention on and off the courts, (store/club etc). A gray grip would have looked cool.
Craftsmanship/fit and finish: Fine..No short cuts or cheap materials.. and a quality paint finish.. which is typical for Head.
Playability: Mixed views but Very NICE.. It was very maneuverable and I enjoyed the Extreme spin.
Myself and others had no problem with depth or pace.. Spin was great.. Sweet spot was decent.
It did feel somewhat hollow and unstable. It needed something.. perhaps CAP grommets..??? to me.. the Head Graphene 360+ Extreme Tour was a Prestige without CAPS, painted yellow and branded an Extreme.. perhaps to capture a new generation????
Serves: Took a few days to figure out how to serve with it.. I had to get use to the feel and flex points to understand what is needed to get the serve consistent. I was able to get more kick and jump with the Head Graphene 360+ Extreme Tour compared to my TF40.
2nd serves were definitely more effective. This is where the quick and mobile feel was an advantage. Racket head speed was easy to achieve. Pace and targeting was fine.
Serve returns: Seemed a little unstable here.. which in return didn’t invoke confidence in returns..Its fast and whippy nature did allow quick responses to get a racket on a ball that allow an offensive return.. Its spinny string also allowed to chip/block balls back with decent depth when out of position.
Forehands: I really could unload on big forehands.. Its quite powerful actually.. I had apply more spin to keep the ball in, but spin came very easily.. Spin is one of its best attributes. I had to adjust my grip and technique at tad. Not many issues placing the ball where I intended it to go.. I could hit a more loopy ball with more ease compared to my TF40. Depth was easy.
Backhands: I could hit really good slice backhands, they floated at times.. but I am sure with more time and different string choice that could be corrected easily. With its spinny nature, you could work the ball nicely… I did like when I was running or out of position how I could chop/chip with ease and the spin would keep the ball deep enough so it wouldn’t be an easy winner for my opponent.
Volleys: Not an area that I can say I am good enough to make a valuable comment or comparison. I did take a 15 minute volley instruction with it..It was not better or worse than my TF40..It did provide more spin.
Overheads: I only had a few..It smashed the ball just fine..I did like how I could flick overhead backhands with spin and bite when playing doubles.
Feel: This is the area that I didn’t like...seemed somewhat hollow and plasticish to me.. most likely the Lynx tour strings. But feel is subjective and my TF40 is one of the best feeling rackets I have ever used.
Subjective Grading:
Serves = A
Serve returns = C
Forehands = A
Backhands = B
Overheads = A
Volleys = B
Maneuverability = A+
Spin = A+

Feel = C
Stability = B-

Overall = B+

Overall comments:
Decent JOB Head, You should sell a lot of these. I enjoyed being part of this Head Graphene 360+ Extreme Tour playtest.. This time I included my friends so they can be part of this cool process. They liked it too.. I feel blessed that TW looks to me and others to provide information and opinions to help those follow TW forum members and others to choose their next tennis racket..
It is always fun when participating in these playtests.. Normally I keep the racket and add it to my collection. This time, I ended up giving my Head Graphene 360+ Extreme Tour to a high school freshman who I frequently hit with and who helped me with the playtest….she played very well with it compared to her dated intermediate racket and I wanted her to keep it and use it for her upcoming season.. she was so surprised and very happy when I told her to keep it. I told her it was for her hard work and determination to reach her goal of a starting position.. I said..“now you have a weapon, do something with it…”

Thanks
A
 

mxblink

Rookie
Based on what people are saying, it sounds like for higher levels of play the Extreme Tour does best with some added weight to help with the plowthrough and stability. I think this is unsurprising given the low stock weight - at some point there's just no substitute for mass. The good news is that the racquet takes weight beautifully. Even with 5g added throughout the hoop, I still find my racquet quite maneuverable.
 

downs_chris

Professional
Based on what people are saying, it sounds like for higher levels of play the Extreme Tour does best with some added weight to help with the plowthrough and stability. I think this is unsurprising given the low stock weight - at some point there's just no substitute for mass. The good news is that the racquet takes weight beautifully. Even with 5g added throughout the hoop, I still find my racquet quite maneuverable.
Good know! I'm looking forward to adding weight to mine...
 

TW Staff

Administrator
Reminder:

Playtesters, your comments are due this Friday, August 16th. If you have already posted your review, thank you and please ignore!

TW Staff
 

beltsman

Legend
Racquet Received: Head Graphene 360+ Extreme Tour

String and tension used for test: At first Head Lynx Tour @ 48, then Tour Status 17/Firewire 17 Hybrid at 46/44.17g = 1.25mm

Tennis experience/background: Been playing rec tennis for 7 years, generally 4.0 level.

Describe your playing style (i.e. serve & volley): Aggressive baseliner who likes to control points with FH and move opponents left and right with spin.

Current racquet/string setups: 360 Extreme MP with Tour Status 17/Firewire 17 Hybrid at 48/46.

How many hours did you play with the racquet? Around 20, a mix of hitting sessions, match play, and ball machine.



Comments on racquet performance:

-Groundstrokes:
It took me a few sessions to dial in groundstrokes. It has a fairly tight pattern. Launch angle was lower than I anticipated, so it required some adjustment from the wide-open Extreme MP. I had to adjust my grip from full SW over a little bit closer to Eastern (maybe Extreme Eastern). Once I adjusted and learned the launch angle, things were pretty nice. I really liked the control. I struggled a bit with depth, which I think has to do with launch angle. Power was okay but not high. Lower powered than I expected for an Extreme. Racquet shined when swinging out, but balls dropped short if I hit out of the sweet spot or didn't get a good swing on the ball.

FH was versatile because I could hit flat easily or add more spin. But this versatility did lead to more errors than I am used to, because ball placement was more dependent on my swing path. I really liked hitting my FH to the ad court corner. The control let me hit with confidence near the lines. But, it was harder to get the ball deep on the run or when pushed back.

Backhands were pretty smooth (1HBH). Low trajectory but the tight pattern made it super easy to hit BH DTL. I struggle to hit BH DTL with the MP. BH slice was very nice if you swing through the ball. Deep slices with great control.

-Serves: This took me the longest to adjust. I am still iffy on serves with it. Personally, I like (need?) more open patterns on serve. I need the extra help for spin. The Tour didn't do much to help my spin. I found myself having to really think about my technique and exaggerating to spin the serve in. This was distracting to have to think about it every serve. It definitely has to do with my not-so-great technique, but I think this indicates that the Tour might be better for players who can easily generate their own spin on serves. Pace was okay, not fantastic, not bad. Control was nice but due to the difficult I had getting spin, I struggled mightily to get my serves outside. It was more of a straight line serve.

-Volleys: I liked it on volleys a lot. The tight pattern gave excellent control. It was maneuverable and easy to volley. Smashes were awesome and easy. I don't go to the net much, but I liked it up there. Combined with the good slice, this stick encouraged me to move up in the court more rather than baseline dueling. But, touch wasn't great. It's okay but not great. Didn't hit many great drop shots.

-Serve returns: I liked it here. Easy to swing around quickly and place balls without worrying about spraying them. Very good ROS control. But, it definitely rewards full strokes.

General reaction/comments on overall performance: This was a tough playtest to judge. Because the racquet was an Extreme, I came in with certain preconceptions. I was expecting big power, open pattern, and big spin. Instead it was moderate power, tight pattern, and moderate spin. It threw me for a loop. If I didn't know it was an Extreme I would probably have liked it more. But I really wanted/expected an MP in a smaller package. But, that out of the way, it is a nice racquet. I can play with it. Groundstrokes are nice once I dialed them in. I like being able to target spots easily and switch between flat and spin hitting. I might prefer the easy spin and higher launch angle of the MP though, particularly for angles and moving opponents side to side and hitting passing shots. Slice was really nice - not floaty! Serves are really where I struggle. I am very streaky with it because it requires a lot of extra focus for me to generate the spin I need.

In summary, good racquet, but probably not for me. I will try it with some thinner strings and a little weight at 12' though. Thinner strings to open it up and weight to get some more ooph on groundstrokes and serves, and maybe easier whip on serves. I think it's a good racquet for slightly more advanced players who prefer control but want access to good spin and moderate power. I think it is best for attacking baseliners who are not spin machines and who like to move forward. I do not think it is ideal for baseline spinners or people who need extra help generating spin on serves.

FH: 7.5/10
BH: 7.5/10
Slice: 8/10
Power: 6.5/10
Control: 8/10
Serves: 5/10
ROS: 8/10
Touch: 7/10
Net: 8/10

Thank you TW for the opportunity! Really happy to be a part of it. Big props to TW for this program.
 

cd3768

Rookie
Racquet received: Head Graphene 360+ Extreme MP

String and tension used for the test:
RS Lyon 17g @ 54/52 lbs

Tennis experience/background:
I started playing about 3 1/2 years ago, played varsity on my high school team, currently on my college's club team.

Describe your playing style (i.e. serve & volley):
I mix it up a bit, mainly stay on the baseline but I'm not afraid to approach the net and throw some serve and volley here and there. I like to hit flat and with spin.

Current racquet/string setups:
Head Graphene 360 Speed Pro w/ RS Lyon 17g @ 48/46 lbs

How many hours did you play with the racquet?
About 15


Comments on racquet performance:

-Groundstrokes:

There was a noticeable increase in speed, spin, and depth with the EMP in comparison to my Speed. I posted earlier that the racquet was a little heavy but that was at the time - I hadn't played for about a week and a half. As I started playing more and more often, I got used to it and could handle it. However, it is a bit head heavier and has a higher swingweight than my Speed.
I could take full swings and expect it to stay in. It is powerful, but I was surprised that shots would stay in. I wasn't too bothered by the different and open string pattern. Even if I thought I hit a flat ball or saw that I didn't hit the ball with much spin, the ball would dip in and my hitting partner would say that it was in.
Control is where my Speed wins I think. There are trade offs such as a low power from the Speed but more spin from the Extreme, but overall, control goes to the Speed. With the Speed, there are less times where I jump and hope that the ball lands in. Directional control is ok with the EMP since it's pretty stable.
I don't think the Spin Shaft of the Extreme isn't as aerodynamic as the shaft of the Pure Aero but I “gelled” well with the Extreme. I remember trying a PAVS Tour and my friend’s Pure Aero (2016) and remember that I didn’t like the shaft because I couldn’t hit flat shots. With the Aero, that beam favored a more vertical swing. But with the Extreme, I could hit both flat and with spin well.
To me, this frame felt like it had weight concentrated at 12 o’clock that gave it a knifing feel on slices which I enjoyed very much.


-Serves:
Serves were great because I could hit flat bombs and wide sliders that would be faster and jump higher than with my Speed. Took a bit of getting used because of the distribution of weight, but I get a lot of pop. Not much to say here other than it's great.


-Volleys:
Again, because of the weight difference between the EMP and my Speed, it took a bit of getting used to, but it was very stable at net. Off-center shots were still good. Had to be a bit careful with drop volleys though because I wasn’t used to the power. I also had to be more conscious of how I took back my racquet.


-Serve returns:
Honestly, for me, I didn’t have too much trouble with return of serve. I could redirect the pace of the ball and put my opponent in trouble instead. I could return it just like with my Speed. Short backswing and get it to the ball, and voila! One thing that I didn’t do too much of was blocking shots back. Here you’d have to just watch the angle of the racquet face so the ball won’t go long.


General reaction/comments on overall performance:
I am definitely considering switching to this racquet. It does pretty much everything better than my Speed and it plays just fine in stock form. Although a higher launch angle, there's more spin, more power, and more feel. Control I have yet to see. It has a similar feel to the 360 Speed MP, but less muted and more solid. Overall, a very forgiving frame that provides loads of spin and pop.
On another note, I felt bad when practicing with others because it was so noticeable that balls were jumping higher and faster and a couple of my friends were shanking the balls. I didn’t want to tone down my swing speed either because the feel and seeing my resulting shots were so addicting!
I would suggest putting in a lower-powered string such as RS Lyon to reign in the power. I was thinking of trying Lynx Tour and a hybrid of Lyon with Velocity and even a gut/Lyon hybrid, but I wanted to test the EMP with my stringbed of choice.
Thank you TW and Head!
 
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fed1

Semi-Pro
Not on the official play test but a couple of observations/feelings on the Extreme Tour, I felt this racquet was a solid performer and should be a big hit for Head. The areas that I struggled with, more than likely due to the weight, were volley stability with anything that had a lot of pace and returning serves, mostly big first serves. No major knocks and nothing that can’t be rectified with additional weight, just my two cents.
 

beltsman

Legend
Racquet received: Head Graphene 360+ Extreme MP

String and tension used for the test:
RS Lyon 17g @ 54/52 lbs

Tennis experience/background:
I started playing about 3 1/2 years ago, played varsity on my high school team, currently on my college's club team.

Describe your playing style (i.e. serve & volley):
I mix it up a bit, mainly stay on the baseline but I'm not afraid to approach the net and throw some serve and volley here and there. I like to hit flat and with spin.

Current racquet/string setups:
Head Graphene 360 Speed Pro w/ RS Lyon 17g @ 48/46 lbs

How many hours did you play with the racquet?
About 15


Comments on racquet performance:

-Groundstrokes:

There was a noticeable increase in speed, spin, and depth with the EMP in comparison to my Speed. I posted earlier that the racquet was a little heavy but that was at the time - I hadn't played for about a week and a half. As I started playing more and more often, I got used to it and could handle it. However, it is a bit head heavier and has a higher swingweight than my Speed.
I could take full swings and expect it to stay in. It is powerful, but I was surprised that shots would stay in. I wasn't too bothered by the different and open string pattern. Even if I thought I hit a flat ball or saw that I didn't hit the ball with much spin, the ball would dip in and my hitting partner would say that it was in.
Control is where my Speed wins I think. There are trade offs such as a low power from the Speed but more spin from the Extreme, but overall, control goes to the Speed. With the Speed, there are less times where I jump and hope that the ball lands in. Directional control is ok with the EMP since it's pretty stable.
I don't think the Spin Shaft of the Extreme isn't as aerodynamic as the shaft of the Pure Aero but I “gelled” well with the Extreme. I remember trying a PAVS Tour and my friend’s Pure Aero (2016) and remember that I didn’t like the shaft because I couldn’t hit flat shots. With the Aero, that beam favored a more vertical swing. But with the Extreme, I could hit both flat and with spin well.
To me, this frame felt like it had weight concentrated at 12 o’clock that gave it a knifing feel on slices which I enjoyed very much.


-Serves:
Serves were great because I could hit flat bombs and wide sliders that would be faster and jump higher than with my Speed. Took a bit of getting used because of the distribution of weight, but I get a lot of pop. Not much to say here other than it's great.


-Volleys:
Again, because of the weight difference between the EMP and my Speed, it took a bit of getting used to, but it was very stable at net. Off-center shots were still good. Had to be a bit careful with drop volleys though because I wasn’t used to the power. I also had to be more conscious of how I took back my racquet.


-Serve returns:
Honestly, for me, I didn’t have too much trouble with return of serve. I could redirect the pace of the ball and put my opponent in trouble instead. I could return it just like with my Speed. Short backswing and get it to the ball, and voila! One thing that I didn’t do too much of was blocking shots back. Here you’d have to just watch the angle of the racquet face so the ball won’t go long.


General reaction/comments on overall performance:
I am definitely considering switching to this racquet. It does pretty much everything better than my Speed and it plays just fine in stock form. Although a higher launch angle, there's more spin, more power, and more feel. Control I have yet to see. It has a similar feel to the 360 Speed MP, but less muted and more solid. Overall, a very forgiving frame that provides loads of spin and pop.
On another note, I felt bad when practicing with others because it was so noticeable that balls were jumping higher and faster and a couple of my friends were shanking the balls. I didn’t want to tone down my swing speed either because the feel and seeing my resulting shots were so addicting!
I would suggest putting in a lower-powered string such as RS Lyon to reign in the power. I was thinking of trying Lynx Tour and a hybrid of Lyon with Velocity and even a gut/Lyon hybrid, but I wanted to test the EMP with my stringbed of choice.
I think the beam shape of the Extreme is key. It's kind of D shaped. In other words, it has some boxiness/flat side. This contributes greatly to control.
 
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