Tennis Warehouse Playtest: Wilson Labs Shift Prototype

ressling

New User
Team..
For those who have tried either version of the Shift...and have used many other rackets.. are you seeing the Shift truly resembling and other racket?
I can't really think of anything..I am thinking that Wilson has did it again by introducing another unique racket..
Closest I think the Shift 315 plays to in the Wilson line is a Blade 18x20 (regular stock). Doesn't quite play like my BP 18x20 and certainly doesn't play at all like my PS Pro 95 18x20. I'm wondering if there are any Ultra-like qualities in the Shift (I've never hit with an Ultra/Ultra Pro).
 

tim-ay

Hall of Fame
Review of the 315 Shift - thanks @TW Staff for an amazing opportunity to hit with this frame.
Summary: In case you don't want to read the whole review.... It's an excellent frame. Great balance between spin, control, power, feel, and comfort. It feels quite different than anything else, a blend of characteristics we've had singularly, but not all in one frame. Power is easy, touch shots are great. Spin is surprising for an 18/20. A great fit for someone who wants a more modern players frame in an 18/20 package.

Details

Setup: Played stock. SW ~332 strung, static around 333 with overgrip. Used Durafluxx 1.23 @46 a couple of times. This is my go to string and baseline against other frames for characteristics.

My Background: Been playing for ~20 years on/off. My sports were more based on physically suffering (a lot of running, cycling, tri), until moving back to Florida from Colorado. Now, play mainly singles, adult internet leagues and regular hitting partners, 4.0-5.0. 5 to 7 days /week play. 50+% on Har Tru, the rest on hard court of various grittiness. Yeah, that makes a difference in perceptions sometimes.

Play style: All court. Love to throw in S&V. Heavy spin, especially on OHBH, but love to drive the ball also on attack. Serving is really important to my game and win/loss percentage.

Current Racket(s): Blade Pros. Throwing in a lot of time with PA+ lately and considering for main rackets. Hit the shift against these, which makes for a weird comparison at times.

Shift Playtime: 30hrs +

Groundstrokes: Really quite excellent from the baseline. Great control and the harder you hit the better the racket feels. Decently stable on the OHBH, although not at my BP level so it took adjustment. Slice backhands are easy to execute. Slice forehand is great too, what you would expect from an 18/20. The big surprise here is the amount of spin. Maybe the best spin I've gotten out of an 18/20..... it rivals most 16/19's. The feel on groundstrokes is unique, but in a very pleasing way. It's 'muted' but not at the level muted normally means. Tough to describe actually as the feel is quite addictive on groundstrokes, especially forehands for me. Durafluxx is stiff enough to bring out the unique flex you get from the Shift, but it's also comfortable (for me). A crisper string might be an even better fit for the frame. To me, this is a massive improvement over the tech used in the Clash, which makes for an erratic string bed response depending on 'hot spots'.... the Shift doesn't have this. It plays like new tech with a more traditional response. All these words and I still can't nail the description of the feel.

Serves: The Shift and I just haven't jelled as much on serves. It's fine and I'm sure it's me, but the level just doesn't approach the power I get from the PA+, Zus, TB, and even my BP's (these are all top tier serving frames tho'...). I don't get the heaviness of the BP either on spin. Serve is too critical to my game and how I hang with better players. Placement is fine with the Shift, but I just don't have that 15-40 confidence to hit 2 aces that I have with the BP and PA+. This is the one area that would keep me from main lining the Shift 315. For a different player or style of play, maybe this wouldn't be an issue, but I really go for my serves and need it to be a difference maker in match play.

Volleys: Excellent volleying frame and very stable. No problem with maneuverability. Touch is outstanding, although I would put this behind my BPs. Still, this is maybe the best retail volleying frame I've used in a few years. When I S&V, I get a lot of high balls as I'm coming in if my serve is on and this thing full out crushes volleys with excellent placement and stability. Low balls / volleys are easy to pick up also, the 18/20 really helps here. I didn't feel the frame needed lead to have great stability.

Returns: Stellar forehand returns with excellent stability and ability to direct the ball with depth and pace. I didn't gel as much on OHBH returns, where I like to come over the ball 70% of the time (?) vs. slice. Slice returns were excellent however. I think a 2 hander wouldn't have any issues here, but stability on the OH is critical for my confidence on returns. Again, to be fair, it's probably like a 7.5/10 for me on BH returns vs. something like the BP at 10/10. Better than most, but not top end for me.

Comments on performance critiera:

Power/Control: The Shift strikes an excellent balance here. Again, maybe the best balance of any retail frame out there (I haven't hit the new Gravity Pro). Power is easy and control is excellent. Against the PA+ and BP I would say this:

- Power PA+> Shift 315 > BP

- Control Shift 315>BP>PA+ ( know, duh.... but these are my frames... lol).

Comfort: The Shift 315 is very comfortable, at least in my Durafluxx set up. Absolutely no arm issues whatsoever. Never felt any soreness that you can get from a frame around this stiffness rating. Had some sessions of > 3hours and it was totally comfortable...... comparisons (another duh)

- Comfort Shift 315 = BP >> PA+
Feel: Surprisingly great, although a different type of feel. Not nearly as connected as my BPs but BP is GOAT feel for me. Less vibrations (the pleasing ones) come into your hand from the Shift than the BP, but also less than stiffer frames and almost no harsh vibrations. It is a bit muted, but not like how Yonex feels to me or other very dampened frames (Diadem Elevate v2). Along with feel goes touch, and touch shots are 9/10 with the Shift. Just excellent. And they feel good with great control due to the 18/20.

- Feel BP>Shift> PA+. duh again. But Shift is kind of alone here, as the feel is so unique. the hardest thing to describe about the frame.

Maneuverability (MVB): I didn't go into this very much above, but the frame is very maneuverable, like a traditional players frame. Surprising for a thicker beamed modern frame, but faster at the net than my BP's and PA's, although closer than others would think or agree with. Anyway, it's a HL players frame more than what I normally play with.

- MVB Shift > BP > PA+

Stability: A very stable frame, but less than my normal frames .... not really fair to the Shift. BPs and PA+ 2023 are walls of stability. The only area stability bothered me was on OHBH and mostly on return of serve. lead at 3/9 would cure this, but I didn't want to raise the TW up too high either. I did measure twistweight, but won't publish it here. I used the Briffidi TW adapter, and frankly you need one to compare my numbers to anything else published. I highly recommend the Briffidi SW1 and TW adapter if you are a geek.

Final comments: I pretty much covered it in my summary. One thing I didn't mention is that I let quite a few people hit the Shift 315. Many comments were "WOW!!!!"...... quite a few "Best frame I've ever hit".... and just a couple "I hate it". haha, gotta love sample testing. I don't think Wilson should change a lot about this frame. I won't switch to it, but that is more about me than the frame. This thing will be a great fit for anyone wanting control, comfort, spin, and good power. It's a modern frame with super characteristics.
 
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A_Instead

Legend
Team: Please forgive for any improper grammar, rambling sentences, bad spell check corrections and info that may not make sense. I didn't realize how lengthy this became..opps and sorry.. DM me for clarity.
Wilson Labs Project SHIFT 99 300G = Another nice tool in the Wilson Tennis Portfolio. >>> Mid-level power with a little extra spin with control that makes tennis easier and fun to play.....
I hope I provided some useful insight to help you in your purchasing decision. As you should know..Wilson is brand of Champions including yesterday, today and tomorrow. Many of the game’s all-time greats choose Wilson to become their best and win Championships. I have and You can to... choose the Wilson Labs Project SHIFT 99 300G or any other great Wilson rackets and products.
Full Discloser: I was given this racket for the playtest, I am not paid nor sponsored by Wilson (but am willing if they are ) and most importantly I do not earn a living playing tennis and don’t pretend too. I am just a hack who loves the game, plays as often as I can and really appreciates the opportunity from TW and whomever else made this happen.
String and Tension: To give a me a good bench mark I first used my two typical Pros Pro Eruption (green) 1.24 at 45 lbs strung on a constant pull electronic machine. Later tried Kirschbaum Pro Line Evolution 1.25 at 45 lbs. (it’s been a chilly spring so these tensions were fine, hopefully I can keep the same tension range as the temperatures rise. No pain with these strings in this racket at the temperatures played. The comfort was welcomed. As with every racket I use, I use a TW worm dampener. (best deal in town)
Time played with so far: If my brain serves me correctly I almost certain that I logged at least 39 hours personally. Including training and match play. Also let my wife (a Clash 100 user) use it when I switched to my other rackets as part of the comparison. My buddy (a Clash Pro user) also hit with it a few times. They both liked it and thought it was more controlled than their Clashes. People around me wanted to know what racket I had as they never saw a white Wilson racket before as I had it stenciled to aid in the promotion.
Background of me:
Racket and Tennis enthusiast always looking for that magic recipe. Right now, it’s the Ezone 98 as it offers a very easy to use 98 inch head, swings very fast with ease and offers the most power and spin to control ratio in a 98 inch head size.
I play an attacking style of tennis and look to end points very quickly. I want and need a racket that provides destruction without much effort. Power and Spin is key. Efficiency is an absolute requirement. I inspire to play my best tennis every time out. I aim to win while having fun doing it.
I am blessed with good health and good friends which allows casual and/or league tennis pretty much every day when the weather permits from April through October. Mainly singles, but doubles if there is opportunity. Opponents very from 3 to 4.5 USTA rating. ( I still can’t score more than 2 points a set no matter how hard I try against TennisManic) Many different styles of play are presented, hence the need of a tool (racket) that covers the variety of styles I face. Luckily March offered some very nice days to get outside to give the Wilson Labs Project Shift 99 300g a really good look.
Looks/Presentation: Wilson has a very nice feature with their color/light adapting paint. While it appears white from a distance. Up close it omits a blueish /gray hue.. Another a cool thing that I noticed was depending on what color shirt you are wearing, those colors come through as well as it absorbs and reflects those colors as well. Also being white it lets different color strings “pop”. IMO Wilson should keep the current all white scheme but change the current black dot matrix logo to a color that represents the line while also changing the white grommets to that same color. Red or Blue would look fantastic..Even Green would be exciting. Colored grommets are a nice look to any frame.. especially to offset the white.
Craftsmanship/Fit Finish: Wilson Quality with that professional feel and detail. No paint chipping issues. Hope they give the final market version a proper red and white “W” butt cap.
 
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A_Instead

Legend
Continued from above..

Playability: Easy racket to use, fun to play with. More performance based than the Clash. Similar to the Ultra but much healthier to use. (IMO the Ultra lost its way after the 2.0 line. Perhaps the Ultra should sunset and let the Shift take its place) The Shift 300G also offers more spin with control. Performance right in the middle between the Clash and Ultra. It will suite Intermediate players fine. If you need to add much weight, then go with the 315.
Groundstrokes: Swings light, a good trait or bad or indifferent depending on your requirement. (I will add 2 grams at high noon simply to bring up the swing weight for heft) The Shift tends to favor those who take the ball slightly early. Its not a dedicated “spin” racket yet permits a decent dose of spin with not much effort. Flatter shots don’t fly. I didn’t have to focus on adding spin to keep the ball in. I could amp up the spin without much effort, but I liked that I didn’t have to focus on spin to keep the ball in.
The Shift is more predicable than the Clash. Less Pop, but more power and control. I didn’t have many issues hitting deep balls with penetration. While I can hit bigger balls with other rackets.. There is no shame in the Shift.
It suited my forehand pretty much without many adjustments. Backhand, my weakest side I seemed to revert to slice more often than not. But that’s me, not the Shift.
Sweet spot size was fine, not small, not to big either. Balls hit middle to lower part of the string bed seemed to feel better and offered greater depth. Balls in the top section of the head where mostly I hit it seemed ok. 3 grams at noon will help with that.
The 99 inch head played more like a 100 inch racket than it did a 98 inch head racket. Offering a “99” is marketing IMO. Niche head size offers additional opportunity for promotion and separation from others.
The 16x20 string pattern is a nice feature. That extra cross firms up the string bed a little and offers a little more control. I didn’t see any lack of spin production with it compared to a similar 16x19.
Serves: My serve has been whack lately as the season is early. I prefer heavier rackets to serve with as they help with follow through, pace and ball penetration. The Shift 300G was noble at serving. I could really whip it through the contact zone very easily and twist my wrist to hit a variety of serves with pace with ease. I really liked how I could easily change pace and variety of serve without much focus. Some rackets just don’t offer a range. I could easily hit very wide and up in the box serves on the deuce side. The mobility helped with that. I will add slight weight at noon to help with heft and tip rotation someday.
Volleys: Approach tennis is a lost art IMO, effective volleys can be that one or two shots in a match that can determine the outcome. Shifts easy mobility enable easy volleys even when ones foundation was not perfect. Sure, it didn’t volley as well as a racket with more weight. But with a little training and focus on proper volleying technique the Shift would check that box
Serve returns: With its high mobility and ease of swing the Shift can be positioned very rapidly for proper returns. Both offensive and defensive returns. I did not know notice much wobble against any opponent. I did like how I can step in and take a wimpy second serve and direct the ball to any location I wanted to. It wasn’t as launchy as the Clash
Power/Control: I rate the power to control ratio to be good. The Shift 300G enables the user to hit a ball with pace with amble control. Its not a rocket launcher, it’s not a Blade. and it not a Clash either where one must scratch their heads after some shots. Lower tension with poly in the 40’s work very good in the Shift. Good ball pocketing. I read on other reviews that higher tension was not to favorable in the Shift. Someday I will try a hybrid string set up. If my wife decides to annex from me, she will go full multi. I can see the Shift handling those string set ups as well. Its sting flexibility will be better than the Clash. It’s not a rocket launcher. It has decent pop with the balls coming out of the string bed. It doesn’t produce a overly heavy ball but depth was fine.
Top Spin/Slice: Top spin came easy, while not a spin only model (which is a good thing as its opens it up to a bigger audience) spin application came very easily. The added main seems to help with control while not limiting spin. Backhand slice which I tend to overuse as it becomes a bailout shoot for me and the Shift 300G was fine with slice. I didn’t notice any floating. If any errant shots did come off the string bed., that’s on me.
Comfort: A absolute requirement of mine. I cannot use any racket that effects my sleep with either hand, wrist, arm and top or bottom elbow pain. In most rackets the silent stiffness catches up to me. (Meaning there is no indication of pain or soreness while playing). Shift. NO issues. I was happy about that as it was fine even using in the chilly weather and balls that felt like bricks with my stroke technique.
Feel: It’s hard for me articulate feel objectively as feel is such a personal and subjective trait. It has that Wilson feel. It didn’t feel harsh or brassy with the tensions and string that I used. It didn’t feel hollow. Neutral is best the description. I doubt “feel” was a design requirement Wilson was trying to achieve. It’s doesn’t have a Blade feel, nor Clash. It has its own identity which is OK by me.
It’s dampened. Not overly muted. I liked the feel with my typical strings/tension and TW worm dampener
Maneuverability: I liked how easy the Shift 300G was to swing on all shots, Serve, forehands, backhands, overheads, chips, cuts, volleys etc. Almost too easy to swing as I was early on my forehands and serves initially… buts that’s me not the Shift. I welcome that its swing weight is lower in stock form and always can be increased very easily and not expensive.
The Shift’s maneuverability will lend itself to be enjoyed by many more players as IMO must players prefer a racket that is easy to swing which translates in to easy to use.
Stability- I did not notice any issues with wobble. I hit the ball pretty clean which helps. For its weight range its find. I also don’t play against players who hit serves at 120 mph nor groundies in the 90’s. If stability becomes an issue with you with the 300G, then I suggest you try the 315G.
General reaction/comments on overall performance:
I always give praise to any manufacture who actually introduces new rackets lines. Wilson seems to do that the best.. I call it innovation. And another example of that from Wilson is the Shift. It’s a cool racket. Nothing like it. A good thing..
While I doubt the Shift 300G will be used on either Tours but that’s not Wilsons intent with the Shift 300G. Its made for those nonprofessional tennis players who inspire to be the best and the Shift is a worthy option to meet that requirement. Will they sell a lot of Shifts.. Yes I think they will. It’s a noble and worthy approach. It could bring more market share to Wilson and should not impede much on any other Wilson line. Likely it will pull from the Class. Yet at the same time create a new segment with in Wilson’s line up to capture shares..If you wanna be a Champion and be the best you can be.. Purchase a Shift in any format and hit the courts and play like there is no tomorrow. DM me if you need too.. Time to end now cause I am rambling.. and I’d rather be playing.
 
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TennisManiac

Hall of Fame
Continued from above..

Playability: Easy racket to use, fun to play with. More performance based than the Clash. Similar to the Ultra but much healthier to use. (IMO the Ultra lost its way after the 2.0 line. Perhaps the Ultra should sunset and let the Shift take its place) The Shift 300G also offers more spin with control. Performance right in the middle between the Clash and Ultra. It will suite Intermediate players fine. If you need to add much weight, then go with the 315.
Groundstrokes: Swings light, a good trait or bad or indifferent depending on your requirement. (I will add 2 grams at high noon simply to bring up the swing weight for heft) The Shift tends to favor those who take the ball slightly early. Its not a dedicated “spin” racket yet permits a decent dose of spin with not much effort. Flatter shots don’t fly. I didn’t have to focus on adding spin to keep the ball in. I could amp up the spin without much effort, but I liked that I didn’t have to focus on spin to keep the ball in.
The Shift is more predicable than the Clash. Less Pop, but more power and control. I didn’t have many issues hitting deep balls with penetration. While I can hit bigger balls with other rackets.. There is no shame in the Shift.
It suited my forehand pretty much without many adjustments. Backhand, my weakest side I seemed to revert to slice more often than not. But that’s me, not the Shift.
Sweet spot size was fine, not small, not to big either. Balls hit middle to lower part of the string bed seemed to feel better and offered greater depth. Balls in the top section of the head where mostly I hit it seemed ok. 3 grams at noon will help with that.
The 99 inch head played more like a 100 inch racket than it did a 98 inch head racket. Offering a “99” is marketing IMO. Niche head size offers additional opportunity for promotion and separation from others.
The 16x20 string pattern is a nice feature. That extra cross firms up the string bed a little and offers a little more control. I didn’t see any lack of spin production with it compared to a similar 16x19.
Serves: My serve has been whack lately as the season is early. I prefer heavier rackets to serve with as they help with follow through, pace and ball penetration. The Shift 300G was noble at serving. I could really whip it through the contact zone very easily and twist my wrist to hit a variety of serves with pace with ease. I really liked how I could easily change pace and variety of serve without much focus. Some rackets just don’t offer a range. I could easily hit very wide and up in the box serves on the deuce side. The mobility helped with that. I will add slight weight at noon to help with heft and tip rotation someday.
Volleys: Approach tennis is a lost art IMO, effective volleys can be that one or two shots in a match that can determine the outcome. Shifts easy mobility enable easy volleys even when ones foundation was not perfect. Sure, it didn’t volley as well as a racket with more weight. But with a little training and focus on proper volleying technique the Shift would check that box
Serve returns: With its high mobility and ease of swing the Shift can be positioned very rapidly for proper returns. Both offensive and defensive returns. I did not know notice much wobble against any opponent. I did like how I can step in and take a wimpy second serve and direct the ball to any location I wanted to. It wasn’t as launchy as the Clash
Power/Control: I rate the power to control ratio to be good. The Shift 300G enables the user to hit a ball with pace with amble control. Its not a rocket launcher, it’s not a Blade. and it not a Clash either where one must scratch their heads after some shots. Lower tension with poly in the 40’s work very good in the Shift. Good ball pocketing. I read on other reviews that higher tension was not to favorable in the Shift. Someday I will try a hybrid string set up. If my wife decides to annex from me, she will go full multi. I can see the Shift handling those string set ups as well. Its sting flexibility will be better than the Clash. It’s not a rocket launcher. It has decent pop with the balls coming out of the string bed. It doesn’t produce a overly heavy ball but depth was fine.
Top Spin/Slice: Top spin came easy, while not a spin only model (which is a good thing as its opens it up to a bigger audience) spin application came very easily. The added main seems to help with control while not limiting spin. Backhand slice which I tend to overuse as it becomes a bailout shoot for me and the Shift 300G was fine with slice. I didn’t notice any floating. If any errant shots did come off the string bed., that’s on me.
Comfort: A absolute requirement of mine. I cannot use any racket that effects my sleep with either hand, wrist, arm and top or bottom elbow pain. In most rackets the silent stiffness catches up to me. (Meaning there is no indication of pain or soreness while playing). Shift. NO issues. I was happy about that as it was fine even using in the chilly weather and balls that felt like bricks with my stroke technique.
Feel: It’s hard for me articulate feel objectively as feel is such a personal and subjective trait. It has that Wilson feel. It didn’t feel harsh or brassy with the tensions and string that I used. It didn’t feel hollow. Neutral is best the description. I doubt “feel” was a design requirement Wilson was trying to achieve. It’s doesn’t have a Blade feel, nor Clash. It has its own identity which is OK by me.
It’s dampened. Not overly muted. I liked the feel with my typical strings/tension and TW worm dampener
Maneuverability: I liked how easy the Shift 300G was to swing on all shots, Serve, forehands, backhands, overheads, chips, cuts, volleys etc. Almost too easy to swing as I was early on my forehands and serves initially… buts that’s me not the Shift. I welcome that its swing weight is lower in stock form and always can be increased very easily and not expensive.
The Shift’s maneuverability will lend itself to be enjoyed by many more players as IMO must players prefer a racket that is easy to swing which translates in to easy to use.
Stability- I did not notice any issues with wobble. I hit the ball pretty clean which helps. For its weight range its find. I also don’t play against players who hit serves at 120 mph nor groundies in the 90’s. If stability becomes an issue with you with the 300G, then I suggest you try the 315G.
General reaction/comments on overall performance:
I always give praise to any manufacture who actually introduces new rackets lines. Wilson seems to do that the best.. I call it innovation. And another example of that from Wilson is the Shift. It’s a cool racket. Nothing like it. A good thing..
While I doubt the Shift 300G it will be used on either Tours but that’s not Wilsons intent with the Shift 300G. Its made for those nonprofessional tennis players who inspire to be the best and the Shift is a worthy option to meet that requirement. Will they sell a lot of Shifts.. Yes I think they will. It’s a noble and worthy approach. It could bring more market share to Wilson and should not impede much on any other Wilson line. Likely it will pull from the Class. Yet at the same time create a new segment with in Wilson’s line up to capture shares..If you wanna be a Champion and be the best you can be.. Purchase a Shift in any format and hit the courts and play like there is no tomorrow. DM me if you need too.. Time to end now cause I am rambling.. and I’d rather be playing.
Now that's a review. o_O
 
Continued from above..

Playability: Easy racket to use, fun to play with. More performance based than the Clash. Similar to the Ultra but much healthier to use. (IMO the Ultra lost its way after the 2.0 line. Perhaps the Ultra should sunset and let the Shift take its place) The Shift 300G also offers more spin with control. Performance right in the middle between the Clash and Ultra. It will suite Intermediate players fine. If you need to add much weight, then go with the 315.
Groundstrokes: Swings light, a good trait or bad or indifferent depending on your requirement. (I will add 2 grams at high noon simply to bring up the swing weight for heft) The Shift tends to favor those who take the ball slightly early. Its not a dedicated “spin” racket yet permits a decent dose of spin with not much effort. Flatter shots don’t fly. I didn’t have to focus on adding spin to keep the ball in. I could amp up the spin without much effort, but I liked that I didn’t have to focus on spin to keep the ball in.
The Shift is more predicable than the Clash. Less Pop, but more power and control. I didn’t have many issues hitting deep balls with penetration. While I can hit bigger balls with other rackets.. There is no shame in the Shift.
It suited my forehand pretty much without many adjustments. Backhand, my weakest side I seemed to revert to slice more often than not. But that’s me, not the Shift.
Sweet spot size was fine, not small, not to big either. Balls hit middle to lower part of the string bed seemed to feel better and offered greater depth. Balls in the top section of the head where mostly I hit it seemed ok. 3 grams at noon will help with that.
The 99 inch head played more like a 100 inch racket than it did a 98 inch head racket. Offering a “99” is marketing IMO. Niche head size offers additional opportunity for promotion and separation from others.
The 16x20 string pattern is a nice feature. That extra cross firms up the string bed a little and offers a little more control. I didn’t see any lack of spin production with it compared to a similar 16x19.
Serves: My serve has been whack lately as the season is early. I prefer heavier rackets to serve with as they help with follow through, pace and ball penetration. The Shift 300G was noble at serving. I could really whip it through the contact zone very easily and twist my wrist to hit a variety of serves with pace with ease. I really liked how I could easily change pace and variety of serve without much focus. Some rackets just don’t offer a range. I could easily hit very wide and up in the box serves on the deuce side. The mobility helped with that. I will add slight weight at noon to help with heft and tip rotation someday.
Volleys: Approach tennis is a lost art IMO, effective volleys can be that one or two shots in a match that can determine the outcome. Shifts easy mobility enable easy volleys even when ones foundation was not perfect. Sure, it didn’t volley as well as a racket with more weight. But with a little training and focus on proper volleying technique the Shift would check that box
Serve returns: With its high mobility and ease of swing the Shift can be positioned very rapidly for proper returns. Both offensive and defensive returns. I did not know notice much wobble against any opponent. I did like how I can step in and take a wimpy second serve and direct the ball to any location I wanted to. It wasn’t as launchy as the Clash
Power/Control: I rate the power to control ratio to be good. The Shift 300G enables the user to hit a ball with pace with amble control. Its not a rocket launcher, it’s not a Blade. and it not a Clash either where one must scratch their heads after some shots. Lower tension with poly in the 40’s work very good in the Shift. Good ball pocketing. I read on other reviews that higher tension was not to favorable in the Shift. Someday I will try a hybrid string set up. If my wife decides to annex from me, she will go full multi. I can see the Shift handling those string set ups as well. Its sting flexibility will be better than the Clash. It’s not a rocket launcher. It has decent pop with the balls coming out of the string bed. It doesn’t produce a overly heavy ball but depth was fine.
Top Spin/Slice: Top spin came easy, while not a spin only model (which is a good thing as its opens it up to a bigger audience) spin application came very easily. The added main seems to help with control while not limiting spin. Backhand slice which I tend to overuse as it becomes a bailout shoot for me and the Shift 300G was fine with slice. I didn’t notice any floating. If any errant shots did come off the string bed., that’s on me.
Comfort: A absolute requirement of mine. I cannot use any racket that effects my sleep with either hand, wrist, arm and top or bottom elbow pain. In most rackets the silent stiffness catches up to me. (Meaning there is no indication of pain or soreness while playing). Shift. NO issues. I was happy about that as it was fine even using in the chilly weather and balls that felt like bricks with my stroke technique.
Feel: It’s hard for me articulate feel objectively as feel is such a personal and subjective trait. It has that Wilson feel. It didn’t feel harsh or brassy with the tensions and string that I used. It didn’t feel hollow. Neutral is best the description. I doubt “feel” was a design requirement Wilson was trying to achieve. It’s doesn’t have a Blade feel, nor Clash. It has its own identity which is OK by me.
It’s dampened. Not overly muted. I liked the feel with my typical strings/tension and TW worm dampener
Maneuverability: I liked how easy the Shift 300G was to swing on all shots, Serve, forehands, backhands, overheads, chips, cuts, volleys etc. Almost too easy to swing as I was early on my forehands and serves initially… buts that’s me not the Shift. I welcome that its swing weight is lower in stock form and always can be increased very easily and not expensive.
The Shift’s maneuverability will lend itself to be enjoyed by many more players as IMO must players prefer a racket that is easy to swing which translates in to easy to use.
Stability- I did not notice any issues with wobble. I hit the ball pretty clean which helps. For its weight range its find. I also don’t play against players who hit serves at 120 mph nor groundies in the 90’s. If stability becomes an issue with you with the 300G, then I suggest you try the 315G.
General reaction/comments on overall performance:
I always give praise to any manufacture who actually introduces new rackets lines. Wilson seems to do that the best.. I call it innovation. And another example of that from Wilson is the Shift. It’s a cool racket. Nothing like it. A good thing..
While I doubt the Shift 300G it will be used on either Tours but that’s not Wilsons intent with the Shift 300G. Its made for those nonprofessional tennis players who inspire to be the best and the Shift is a worthy option to meet that requirement. Will they sell a lot of Shifts.. Yes I think they will. It’s a noble and worthy approach. It could bring more market share to Wilson and should not impede much on any other Wilson line. Likely it will pull from the Class. Yet at the same time create a new segment with in Wilson’s line up to capture shares..If you wanna be a Champion and be the best you can be.. Purchase a Shift in any format and hit the courts and play like there is no tomorrow. DM me if you need too.. Time to end now cause I am rambling.. and I’d rather be playing.
Thx for the review! Did you happen to be able to measure the swingweight?
 

mad dog1

G.O.A.T.
No swing weight... with 5 G gram over grip, 2 gram grip collar and 3 gram dampener.. feels about 318
I recommend getting a Briffidi. It’s the least expensive device to accurately and easily measure SW reliably. Completely takes the guess work out of trying to determine SW by “seat of the pants” feel which I have found to be hit or miss. Sometimes the misses are wild, too. Having a SW device has been a game changer for me.
 

Fintft

G.O.A.T.
Yes...it's a light and fast swinging racket..
If you need that much weight to the 300G... Go for the 315G..
No thanks, as I went down from the 345g RF97A to 305g racquets.
Case in point, I don't need anything heavier that Blade Pro v8.
Easy to swing once you start it, hence easy power...

But if I can get my hands on a 315g Shift, I'll try it, for sure, after reading the reviews here.
Besides only 4g were optional to all that I've added to the 300g( the overgrip or the head guard tape are a must for all my racquets).
 

A_Instead

Legend
There will certainly be swing weights available in the range between the two...
I once had a Clash 100 and Clash Pro that had nearly identical static weight and swing weight..
I also had another Clash 100 that even felt heavier than a Clash Pro. It's swing weight if I was to guess was 335 ish.
In most cases I hand pick or pay extra for a desired spec..
 

Mischko

Professional
And I did pay extra for matching service, and all Shift 300s are below 280sw... 320sw strung seems to be but a marketing number provided by Wilson, not average spec measured by TW. Because if it were then we'd find many Shift 300s above 320sw strung as well, and not only these fly swatters..
 
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A_Instead

Legend
As the story is told.. these are preproduction runs and the launch of the official release will be later this summer...
Perhaps the feedback that they are asking for (as part of the marketing campaign) will actually be taken into consideration with the final release..
I do not plan to invest in any additional Shifts until they are fully released..
Hoping they will be release as a Wimbledon edition..
 

avocadoz

Professional
We were given until the beginning of April to provide a full review. I thought it was fantastic to allow me more play time since the weather hasn't been very favorable down here in Southern California.
It’s unusual to hear someone say SoCal weather is unfavorable in March. Climate change is real.
 

Mischko

Professional
Preproduction runs..yeah, no. They made their expected batches of racquets, and instead of launching them normally some marketing manager said "I know, let's launch it as LABS, that's so fashionable, now everyone is doing it, suckers will fall for it just watch. Oh, and let's print some "Limited" bs on it, so that there's no discounts, buy it while it lasts etc., and of course we'll give them the option to give us "feedback"! (insert Ray Liotta meme here). And then 6 months later we do it all over again, same carbon fibre frames, different paint, but now it's the "real deal"..and we'll paint e.g. Korda's Blade like a retail Shift. Genius, right?!"

People fall for that **** it's a fact. Personally I want to buy the racquet because it's a good racquet, innovative, and doesn't have neon lights and RGB LEDs all over it, I like the minimalism.

There's also a big DISLIKE for Wilson not allowing TW to make their usual review, or measure average sw.. They already have a good product, they should use the time and energy to fix their horrible QC instead of all this half sociopathic bs.
 
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zykoniko

New User
I played with my Wilson Shift 300 yesterday !
I own two wilson shifts, measured with 277 swingweight unstrung. So i think only 307 SW strung!

I strung both with Luxion Adrenaline 22 kg.

And i am shocked.... i played this racked stock without lead.

I won against an opponent 6/0 ... normally i lose !
I also won every training set...

I thought that with this low sw the racket is unplayable.... but no... it was the best racket i ever played! And it was the best tennis i can play. so much faster balls.

And i played with RF 97, Pure Aero , Blade 305 in the past. All with much higher sw.

I had so much stabilty yesterday, but also so much power and this racket was so easy to manouver... every return was offensive. And i also had the fastes serves ever...with 307 SW.... how is this possible...

I play level 4.5 nearly.

I never played such a racket with so low sw.... but its a magic stick.

I will buy 2 more shift next days with SW 297!
 

Trip

Hall of Fame
@zykoniko - Sounds like you're still in the honeymoon phase -- ie. still hyper-compensating. I'd recommend playing a few more weeks to give your biomechanics a chance to normalize, before ordering more sticks. But, to each their own!
 
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Preproduction runs..yeah, no. They made their expeced batches of racquets, and instead of launching them normally some marketing manager said "I know, let's launch it as LABS, that's so fashionable, now everyone is doing it, suckers will fall for it just watch. Oh, and let's print some "Limited" bs on it, so that there's no discounts, buy it while it lasts etc., and of course we'll give them the option to give us "feedback"! (insert Ray Liotta meme here). And then 6 months later we do it all over again, same carbon fibre frames, different paint, but now it's the "real deal"..and we'll paint e.g. Korda's Blade like a retail Shift. Genius, right?!"

People fall for that **** it's a fact. Personally I want to buy the racquet because it's a good racquet, innovative, and doesn't have neon lights and RGB LEDs all over it, I like the minimalism.

There's also a big DISLIKE for Wilson not allowing TW to make their usual review, or measure average sw.. They already have a good product, they should use the time and energy to fix their horrible QC instead of all this half sociopathic bs.
Are they not allowing TW to do their normal review on both Shifts? That's interesting.

I love the 315 and switched to it, have a couple of matching swingweight sticks that I plan to use for a while, regardless of what gets launched this summer (likely to not be much different imo)
 

Mischko

Professional
That's just me guessing, as part of a rant..how would I know really. But if the average is 320, and all mentioned here on the forum, and on youtube videos are approx 305, that means that there are many with 335sw, in order to calculate a 320sw average.. So what do you think, are there many Shift 300s strung with 1.25 Alu with a 335sw?
 
Agreed, I'm very suspicious about their avg swingweight for the 300 in particular, but probably true for the 315 - avg swingweight is listed as 329 strung, and I worked hard to find "underspec" ones that I find to be ~328 strung (293 unstrung).
 

kblades

Rookie
@TW Staff - Can you guys clear the air here regarding the listed 320SW for the 300g Shift? Did you guys come up with this average via your normal process of sampling a batch of racquets?
 
I played with my Wilson Shift 300 yesterday !
I own two wilson shifts, measured with 277 swingweight unstrung. So i think only 307 SW strung!

I strung both with Luxion Adrenaline 22 kg.

And i am shocked.... i played this racked stock without lead.

I won against an opponent 6/0 ... normally i lose !
I also won every training set...

I thought that with this low sw the racket is unplayable.... but no... it was the best racket i ever played! And it was the best tennis i can play. so much faster balls.

And i played with RF 97, Pure Aero , Blade 305 in the past. All with much higher sw.

I had so much stabilty yesterday, but also so much power and this racket was so easy to manouver... every return was offensive. And i also had the fastes serves ever...with 307 SW.... how is this possible...

I play level 4.5 nearly.

I never played such a racket with so low sw.... but its a magic stick.

I will buy 2 more shift next days with SW 297!
did you change your handle grip at all?
 

c0ppo

New User
I'm getting some arm pains with my Shift 315. Using hyper G strung with 21/22kg. SW is 328.
Love the racket, but as I've mentioned previously, I have a sensitive arm. Gonna give it a 2-3 weeks, and if the pain persists or gets worse, switching again to gravity :(
 
I'm getting some arm pains with my Shift 315. Using hyper G strung with 21/22kg. SW is 328.
Love the racket, but as I've mentioned previously, I have a sensitive arm. Gonna give it a 2-3 weeks, and if the pain persists or gets worse, switching again to gravity :(
Oof sorry to hear that! I too have had arm issues but so far I’ve been good with the 315. I find hyper g to be pretty stiff - what about a softer poly? Maybe slightly lower tension?
 

avocadoz

Professional
I find the 315 to play quite a bit stiffer than the 300 despite the same RA rating. I’m not surprised people are experiencing arm pain.
 
It could be also that it’s heavier than they’re used to, coming around late and hitting off center more. The high end of these can be in the 340s swingweight (I measured one at 350)
 

c0ppo

New User
Oof sorry to hear that! I too have had arm issues but so far I’ve been good with the 315. I find hyper g to be pretty stiff - what about a softer poly? Maybe slightly lower tension?

I use hyper g 1.15mm in almost all of my rackets. With GPro there isn't an issue at all for example.
I've tried to play with 20/21kg, but since I hit rather flat, balls were sailing rather long. I now, it's me and not the racket.

It could be also that it’s heavier than they’re used to, coming around late and hitting off center more. The high end of these can be in the 340s swingweight (I measured one at 350)

I used GPro before Shift. With 10gr added to the handle. Usually I play with 320gr+ rackets (customized or not), and the weight isn't an issue. At all.
328SW with my Shift, so rather low. My GPros are on 335SW. Strung of course.
 

Fintft

G.O.A.T.
No thanks, as I went down from the 345g RF97A to 305g racquets.
Case in point, I don't need anything heavier that Blade Pro v8.
Easy to swing once you start it, hence easy power...

But if I can get my hands on a 315g Shift, I'll try it, for sure, after reading the reviews here.
Besides only 4g were optional to all that I've added to the 300g( the overgrip or the head guard tape are a must for all my racquets).
I jinxed myself, after hitting just now, first time, for an extended time (2h) with the Shift 300 (actually about 315g unstrung with added weight and with a SW strung of about 325), as I think that I like it more than my regular BP v8.
Sure I can hit harder with BP when I have time to line up my shots (or as the current city champion put it: "BP it's easy to swing once you start it- hence you get free power"), but in average I think I hit harder with the Shift 300 and return better.
Feel wise I'l take the BP.

I did get the memo from my strongest partner (almost 5.0 and club champion) who praised it a lot, even played and won a championship match (against a past champion with it). I've noticed too that when we practice that he hits better against me with the Shift 300 than with any of his racquets (and I laugh at him).
 
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BBender716

Semi-Pro
I jinxed myself, after hitting just now, first time, for an extended time (2h) with the Shift 300 (actually about 315g unstrung with added weight and with a SW strung of about 325), as I think that I like it more than my regular BP v8.
Sure I can hit harder with BP when I have time to line up my shots (or as the current city champion put it: "BP it's easy to swing once you start it- hence you get free power"), but in average I think I hit harder with the Shift 300 and return better.
Feel wise I'l take the BP.

I did get the memo from my strongest partner (almost 5.0 and club champion) who praised it a lot, even played and won a championship match (against a past champion with it). I've noticed too that when we practice that he hits better against me with the Shift 300 than with any of his racquets (and I laugh at him).
You and I are having similar BP v8 vs Shift 300 journeys lol

I'm having mine restrung and we'll see how BK/Grey Fire @ 44lbs compares to my usual 46lbs BHS7T
 

Newby

Semi-Pro
I think it says something when I’ve been preferring the Shift 300 to the BP lately. Only problem is I’m developing a bit of arm pain. Could be that I just aggravated an existing injury from overplaying and demoing too many rackets but the stiffness might be problematic for me long term. We’ll see I guess.
 

ngoster

Semi-Pro
As always, much appreciation goes out to TW and Wilson for generously giving me the opportunity to take part in the review of the Shift 315.

I'm submitting this review to meet the deadline but will continue to play with it beyond the official review period and provide feedback.

String and tension used for test: IsoSpeed Baseline Spin 1.25 mains at 46# and Mantis Power Synthetic 1.25 crosses at 51#

Tennis experience/background: I'm an NTRP 3.5 but how well I hit cycles between 3.75 to 4.25. It's a constant work in progress to reduce the gap between the lows and highs. My footwork and preparation, or lack thereof, are horrible. My forehand is much stronger than my backhand, of which, I tend to slice more than go over the top. I love singles but am a better at doubles.

Describe your playing style (i.e. serve & volley): My game style is to trade baseline shots until I force a short ball to attack. I'm equally comfortable coming in behind the ball for a volley or groundstroke putaway. Here are a couple of clips of me hitting with the Shift and my CX 200 Tour 16M. To add some context, we generally start our rallies up the middle then move it around as it goes on. Sometimes unintentional winners are hit hehe. Also, my apologies in advanced for the stupid audio but the session was so much fun. You may want to mute it lol. I'm still more comfortable hitting the CX and am still getting used to the Shift.

Current racquet/string setups: My current favorite racquet and setup is the Dunlop CX 200 Tour 16x19 with Head Lynx Tour 1.25 mains at 45# and Gosen OG Micro 17 crosses at 49#.

How many hours did you play with the racquet?: I was able to get about 16 hours of hitting in with the Shift.

Groundstrokes: Access to power was much easier with this frame compared to my CX. For an 18x20 pattern, the spin is also there but it required me to be more deliberate with my stroke. When I felt sluggish, the pushiness in my swing really showed. I was also hitting the net more often than with my CX. The shots weren't the kind that left the string bed and dipped hard into the net. They were liners to the net. I think this had to do with the overall feel, balance and, maybe, the unique way that the frame flexes. Sometimes I felt like the position of the racquet relative to my hands got lost. I guess the term would be disconnected. Another interesting thing regarding the power. Even though it felt easier, it didn't have the heaviness that the CX produced. Again, I think this will improve with more getting used to.

Serves: The only serving experiences I had were from playing 2 matches. Both times felt the same. What stood out to me most was how soft the string bed felt. The ball felt like it really sunk in there. Performance-wise, I was getting noticeably more spin compared to the CX but I was getting better control and power from the CX. I just felt like I couldn't really lay into it like the CX. Similar to the groundstrokes, I didn't feel as connected.

Volleys: This was a fun volleying frame. For having a thicker frame (compared to the CX), it was quick. Add the larger sweet spot and solid stability, block volleys were a piece of cake. Directional and depth control were also very good.

Serve Returns: Service returns were very good. I don't face too many big serves with the group that I play with. Block returns mostly happen on my backhand side. Slices were easy to hit. Results were deep with good control. There was more versatility on the forehand side. Inside out flat or topspin returns were easily produced on the ad side but my favorite shot with this frame was a sharp wide curler landing inside the service box corner.

Power/Control: Both were very good with this frame. Power was easy to produce. The only caveat I have relative to control is that it's very dependent on your stroke. Spin generation needs to be deliberate. Although you may not be hitting the fences, you will have challenging time keeping the ball inside the lines.

Topspin/Slice: Both were easy to produce. I'm not going to comment on the backhand topspin because mine are horrid. The slices, however, were easy. The forehand topspin is easy also but the swing can't be lazy and abbreviated. You'll feel it when you connect. The ball really sinks in feeling buttery soft producing a shot that kicks up higher than anything that I normally produce. I felt it a few times and was completely wowed.

Comfort: This is one of the most comfortable frames that I've hit with. Knock on wood, I have a pretty healthy wrist and elbow but there was not hint of discomfort with this. If the RA is really the TW listed 68, it certainly feels much softer.

Feel: If I had a knock, it may be that the frame is too comfortable where I felt a little disconnect at times. In the frame's defense, the strings may be partially at blame. The IsoSpeed/Mantis combo are softer than my normal setup. I will try going up in tension and/or go with my normal setup. If we're talking feel relative to touch type shots, I can't comment as I have stone hands and couldn't hit a touch drop shot to save my life.

Maneuverability: Regardless of its thickness, it didn't feel slow. Off the ground, my CX feels whippier. The biggest tell is on the backhand side. Even though it sucks, it does feel quicker with my CX. At net, the Shift moves around nicely.

Stability: The Shift is very good in this department also. I didn't notice much twisting on off-centered shots. Based on pictures that I posted earlier in this thread, I can honestly say that I hit more off-centered shots than on.

Overall Performance/General Reactions: For me, I think the Shift 315 ticks a lot of boxes in terms of performance. It doesn't feel overly polar as other 18x20 frames that I've experienced in the past. It has a good balance of power, control and SPIN. It definitely has me intrigued to try and grow into it more. I'd like to try a couple of string setups as well as, maybe, switching to a leather grip (based on AC Tennis's review) to enhance the feel.
 

Fintft

G.O.A.T.
I think it says something when I’ve been preferring the Shift 300 to the BP lately. Only problem is I’m developing a bit of arm pain. Could be that I just aggravated an existing injury from overplaying and demoing too many rackets but the stiffness might be problematic for me long term. We’ll see I guess.
I can also feel a bit my elbow today after a first hit with a pro (I'll try the BP against him next time to see if it's the racquet).
 

Fintft

G.O.A.T.
It's gone now, it was just a tinge.
But it might come down to what the city champ (and my coach's brother, former opponent of Shapovalov) said about BP: that it is easy to swing, once you start it.
That might be an advantage over the Shift 300.
 

jmorker

Rookie
This review is for Wilson Shift 300 but I also own Shift 315 so will be making comparison/comments of both. If you don’t want to read the whole thing, my pick is Shift 300 over 315..

String and tension used for test:
  • S300 (main/cross)
    • alu power 16l/wilson sensation 16@48/50 - was the favorite setup for best combination of control, power, sping
    • poly tour rev 16/rexis comfort 16@46/50 - was nice for bit more spin but comfort was not great for my sensitive elbow
    • dunlop iconic all @48 - was best for comfort, less spin/control
  • S315 (main/cross)
    • alu power 16l/rexis comfort 16@48/50 - nice overall combination for everything
    • volkl v-torque tour 17@48 - played best tennis, spin, power, control from spin
    • volkl cyclone 18@50 - was launchy and not great overall

Tennis experience/background: Start playing tennis pretty late in my late 30’s, got into it because my wife was a junior pro player growing up in Spain. So its been my life goal since picking up a racket to beat her in a match, it hasn’t happen yet.. my regular hitting partners vary from 3.5 to 4.5 levels
Describe your playing style (i.e. serve & volley): aggressive baseliner, 2HBH, SW forehand
Current racquet/string setups: I’ve been switching rackets pretty often because of this forum but 2 that remains in the bag and I play the most consistent tennis with are Wilson Ultra Tour (my wife’s favorite) and Head Gravity MP both slightly customized. Current string setup is either gut/poly hybrid or full bed of triax due to recent TE.
How many hours did you play with the racquet? Shift 300 around 8hrs, Shift 315 around 10hrs

-Groundstrokes: S300 (8/10) - S315 (8/10)
Both Shift rackets have excellent combination of spin, power, and control. From the very first hit, the groundstrokes felt amazing from both wings. I liked S300 more for my forehand but preferred S315 for my 2HBH. The lighter SW/static weight made it easy to generate RHS with S300 which I prefer on my forehand. The lightness of S300 also made it easier to defend when pushed wide and neutralize the point with depth on defensive shots. I struggle on my backhand with S300, I hit relatively flatter on my backhand so prefer bit more SW/static weight to hit more penetrating shots. I was able to hit consistent shot on my backhand with S300 but it felt like the ball had spin but sit up in opponents strike zone. Opposite experience with S315, my backhand felt amazing with S315 being able to hit more winners and force more errors. This was also true on my forehand with S315 hit more winners and force more errors but I was also making more errors (being late on my shots as the game went on). With S300 on my forehand side, I was more consistent throughout the match and compensate for “lack of plow” by maintaining RHS throughout the match. But definitely it was noticeable that S315 when I am fresh, hit better balls on both sides giving my hitting partners harder balls it seems. With S300 on groundstrokes even though I was consistent on both sides, however more balls were being returned and rallies were bit longer than I preferred. Slices were very good with both, expected that from S315 with denser pattern but surprisingly S300 produced low and deep slice shots. Overall both produces amazing groundstrokes with a nice powerful response but controllable with spin so likely better tailored to SW/Western grips and modern strokes. FYI my wife (eastern grip and hits flat) hit with S300 briefly and didn’t like it as much compared to Ezone 98 and Ultra Tour.

-Serves: S300 (9/10) - S315 (8/10)
Best serving racket for me that I have tried in last 2 years of racket journey. I have hit more aces with Shift than any other rackets. You can hit some flat bombs, I personally notice the stiffer feel of the racket when hitting a flat serve so I think maybe that helps with the power (maybe due to torsional stiffness). S315 hit better flat serve vs S300 was better for kick serve. With thickish beam, generous head size, and how the racket swings easy all works for a great serving racket for me. Slight edge to S300 for me since I can maintain the serve consistency throughout the match.

-Volleys: S300 (8/10) - S315 (9/10)
S300 for being a light frame it felt stable at this static weight and easy to maneuver around the net which makes it for a nice volley friendly racket, decent power but could be better. S315 has that put away power at net and just rock solid even on off center hits. Maneuverability is not as good as S300 but better than other 315g rackets i.e. Gravity Pro.

-Serve returns: S300 (8/10) - S315 (9/10)
I preferred S315 for returns as you can hit out without worrying too much about hitting it long compared to S300 which was bit more lively. Had to dial back some with S300 but at the same time it was easy to block fast serves and get a good depth on the return. S315 rock solid again on returns on fast serves whilst S300 felt slight jarring on off center hits. Just felt more confident attacking on returns with S315 vs S300 found myself chipping back returns more.

Power/Control- S300 (9/10) - S315 (9/10)
Both provide very good power and control combination. With thickish beam width and tighter mains vs wider crosses seems to help with easy power but controllable power with spin. Hitting with Shift vs other rackets, I can really see the balls deep in more with Shift with similar strokes. Would give edge to S315 for better directional control than S300 and if I can maintain the RHS with S315, definitely hit more powerful shots but I can’t maintain it throughout the match vs S300 I can which then provided me with the consistent power. From recent rackets I have tried, Power/Control for S300 seems close to 23 Vcore 98 whilst S300 seems close to T-Fight ISO 305.

Top Spin/Slice- S300 (9/10) - S315 (9/10)
I found both rackets produced very good spin and nice on slice (more so for S315 than S300). Even with full bed of multi, I was seeing decent spin and balls deep near the baseline. Maybe easier spin generation with less of an effort with S300 whilst you kind of need to put more into it for S315 to generate similar level of spin but definitely easier spin compared to other 18x20s. With last cross being so low, it actually is like 18x19 pattern which I think is great combination for flat and spin hitting.

Comfort- S300 (8/10) - S315 (7/10)
I am recovering from TE recently so probably not the best to judge the comfort. However for listed RA of high 60s, it feels rather comfortable on groundstrokes. My TE is due to combination of trying so many rackets/polys recently and also muscle fatigues. S315 after playing more than 2+ hours with full bed of poly did give me elbow pain in the evening/next day. Full bed of poly on both frames definitely gave me some arm soreness. Lower 40s hybrid was fine.. bit of soreness at high 40s hybrid with poly in the main also gave me some soreness.. But if I wasn’t recovering from TE, I don’t think it would have bother me much. Only time felt stiffness of the frame was on flat server

Feel- S300 (9/10) - S315 (9/10)
I like the feel of these rackets since I prefer muted feel i.e. Yonex frames with VDM. Typically I play with dampener but could play without it on the Shift. It also makes this muted ‘thud’ sound on impact which I like.

Maneuverability- S300 (9/10) - S315 (8/10)
S300 so easy to maneuver due to its weight and I think very low SW. S315 also seems pretty easy to maneuver but obviously as the match goes on I did notice the weight and heavier SW affecting the maneuverability but comparing it to other rackets in its class, it seems easier to maneuver (assuming your fit with good technique to swing it throughout the match, I am not unfortunately so can only manage it to swing it freely for a set)

Stability- S300 (8/10) - S315 (9/10)
For its weight class S300 feels really stable, noticed lack of stability only on badly mishits or returning fast paced serves vs S315 felt rock solid.

General reaction/comments on overall performance:
Overall I think Shift is great new line offering from Wilson to compete against other brands spin/power line likes of Head Extreme/Speed, Babolat VS/98s, Yonex Vcore 98, etc. Its easy to pick up and play but still more of a modern player frame that is not for a beginner. I preferred S315 overall but at the end, it is still too much of a racket for my skill level. It had similar characteristic to T-Fight ISO 305 which I really liked as well but ended to being too demanding. S300 is interesting.. I liked it overall in terms of how easy it was to play and hit consistent shots without feeling tired which I need however as much as it was easy for me to play with it also felt like my balls were easier for my opponents to hit back. Maybe some customization to the head and increase the SW would help.. S300 was by far one of the best serving racket I have tried recently, same for S315 but couldn’t serve with the same pace for the entire match.. long story short, if you are advanced and fit player with good techniques would definitely recommend the Shift 315 for a racket that truly does provide great mix of power, spin, and control. Shift 300 for someone who likes Wilson and was looking for 16x20 modern player frame (what clash 98 didn’t provide) with great maneuverability and power/stability in light package.

Thanks to TW and Wilson for this opportunity!
 

alexsoin

Semi-Pro
My review for Shift315
String and tension used for the test: Technifibre Ice Code 1.25 (white) at 50lbs
Tennis experience/background: Nearly 25 years on and off, mostly on har-tru clay: singles and doubles 4.5-5.0
Describe your playing style (i.e. serve & volley): All court play: heavy topspin groundies, throwing big serves with volleying at times
Current racquet/string setups: Babolat Pure Strike 18x20 (gen 3)
How many hours did you play with the racquet? 20+

-Groundstrokes: IMO the best aspect of Shift 315 and this playtest, better than my PS 18x20s. 9/10, I felt like groundies were more solid than with my PS 18x20s. The big aspect is the unique feel which is quite addictive then you hit sweetspot consistantly and cleanly. My hitting partners commented on crazy spins, general heaviness and depth of my shots. It definitely takes less effort to generate heavy spin and power as compared to hitting with PS 18x20s, especially on forehands. Slicing is easy and gets a great bite similar/same to PS 18x20s. I had no problem mixing in, throwing some junk balls, lobs, tricky dropshots. And again this is due to the great and unique feel. My flattish OHBH probably still needs more dialing in, been a bit of hit-and-miss so far. I blame the very wide throat/neck area as Shift315 feels a bit awkward on a takeback for my non-dominant hand/palm as I tend to hold higher,close to the strings and my hands are average-sized. I use 4 3/8 and didn't use OG since the tip of the grip is a bit bulkier than Babolat's 4 3/8.

-Serves: I'll give 7.5/10 and mostly because of slight power loss. I made up with consistency and better slice and kick angles but I miss extra 10+ MPHs from serving with PS 18x20s. I think my racket might have SW of 340+ strung despite being 2g under spec (313g unstrung). This might be the root cause, I am just unable to accelerate this racket enough. It usually takes longer to dial-in with my serves, serves are last to show up after the racket switches for me. I didn't feel like I couldn't handle racket's SW on groundies, volleys or returns even against really big hitters.

-Volleys:
8.5/10 Great volleying frame, really solid on blocking high-paced shots thanks to the higher static weight and SW. Shift's addictive feel makes it all work nicely at the net: killing higher volleys and overheads, delicate drop-volleys or faster angled ones. Tested this racket in doubles matches and it stands well on quick volley to volley exchanges as well. I'd rate my PS 18x20s at 9/10 for its slightly crisper and less muted response on volleys.

-Serve returns:
8.5/10 On pair with my PS 18x20s. All shots worked great: destroying weak 2nd serves, rolling back heavy topspin, slicing and blocking on a reach. Thanks to higher static weight and SW, Shift's returns are very consistent and solid. I played a couple of strong serve-n-volley guys and had to generate good passing shots and heavy tospin dippers and Shift315 was a blast to play with.

Power/Control- Just the right combination of power and control for me. Slightly more powerful than PS 18x20s, most likely due to a bit more open Shift's 18x20 pattern in the center/sweetspot.
Top Spin/Slice- This is my 5th 18x20 racket and Shift's hand down the spinniest one. This helps to make up for being slightly more powerful. Slices are top-notch.
Comfort- Absolutely no issues of soreness in my wrists, eblows, shoulders and I had a history of having such. Despite Shift's higher RA 68-69 (as opposed to PS 18x20 at 65-66) the comfort is top-notch. I used medium stiffness poly full bed at 50 lbs. PS 18x20s for comparison were bothering me a little at the beginning of my switch from very flexy Yonex Vcore Pro HD 18x20.
Feel- Great soft-feeling slightly muted racket. The repsonse is unique and this is my first Wilson frame ever. I played mostly with Yonex-es before a bit with Head and Babolat lately. It really gets addictive if you keep hitting Shift's generous sweet spot cleanly and consistently!
Maneuverability- A little concerned about Wilson's QC and many Shift315s having SW over 340. My racket is around 340 (sorry I couldn't measure to be sure) and I had/have issues dialing-in with my serves. For comparison my PS 18x20s were in tight 330-335 range and they feel more maneuverable.
Stability- Definitely very stable frame. Thanks to higher static and swing weight and thicker beam. Where Shift's makes up with ploughthru, PS 18x20s make up with crisper reponse. Both on pair for me.

General reaction/comments on overall performance: I'm still dialing-in, hitting with Shift315 and considering the switch. Getting my serves a bit spicier and get over that slight awkwardness on OHBH takeback would do it for me. Shift315 is a unique frame, it inspires me to be more creative in my matches and i like that. And it'll work perfectly fine for serves+1 or returns+1 i.e. simplified points under pressure. I'm also eager to see that type of PJ final version of Shift315 would be, pearly light blue is a bit girly for my liking :)
 
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