The future of men's tennis is Italian.

How many slams will these Italians win between them?


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Italian women's tennis went through a golden era over the last couple of decades with Italian Stallions Schiavone, Pennetta, Errani and Vinci winning Fed Cups, slams, reaching slam finals and generally just kicking ass. It's probably going to go through a slump now with very few young females emerging apart from Cocciaretto.

Not to worry, because the future of men's tennis is Italian. Not since the days of Panetta, Pietrrangelii, Barrazutti and Bertolacci have we seen the likes of this army of stallions stampeding through the singles rankings.

Under twenty-five in the the top 60 are Sonego and Berrettini. They're promising, but here's where the real guns come out to play.

At 197, is 17 year-old Jannik Sinner, so named because he don't go to confession-he's too busy kicking ass. This guy is the next Andy Murray, only without the strain of losing DNA. He's younger than everyone ranked above him. He has excellent court coverage, defensive skills, mental fortitude and tactics. He's got a cool forehand, backhand, volleys and serve.This ginger stallion is going right to the carrot top.



At 375, is the Australian Open junior champion, 17 year-old Lorenzo Musetti. He's a bit of a headcase at the moment, but he's only young. Imagine Gasquet with Fognini's sex appeal, then being slapped in the face by Roger Federer with a baguette-that's what it's like to compete with this stallion on the court.He has the touch, tweeners, drop-shots, lobs, tweener lobs, tweener drop-shot lobs and angles. He has a killer backhand.He's the most stylish player since Federer. It's only a matter of time before he puts it all together and starts crushing the opposition.


At 382, it's 17 year-old Guilio Zeppieri, semi-finalist at Australion Open juniors with a strong forehand. He looks a bit slight and small but he's apparently six-foot, so he's just lulling his opponent into a false sense of security with optical illusions-a short sign of a future magician on the court.


If that doesn't whet your appetite and you think those guys will bomb, then not to fear because Luca Nardi is the next stallion on the horizon. He has been compared to Federer already by the former number 42 Stefano Pescosolido. He's already ranked number 60 in juniors.

Born in August 2003, Nardi has been one of the best players of his generation, winning his first U12 title in 2015 in Padova and adding two more in the U14 category in 2016, still at the age of 12! Luca conquered Les Petits As Mondial Lacoste, the biggest event in the world for U14 players, beating Hamad Medjedovic in the title match, and he was almost unbeatable during the season, winning the U14 title in Pavia and his first ITF junior crown in Tirana as a qualifier, playing only his second event in the oldest category. He become the second player from the 2003 generation who won a match on a pro circuit at the age of 14.


Then there's the young fringe guys like Forti, Moroni, Baldi, Mager and possibly 17 year-old junior Flavio Cobolli who recently reached the quarter-finals of the junior French Open, only to be defeated by the Wimbledon junior champion, all of which will help ensure Italy will be a force in the Davis Cup for years to come.

In five or six years, once these guys have developed, the big three will be gone or on the way out and it'll be the start of the golden age of Italian tennis the like of which the world has never seen.

Zverev, Tsitsipas, De Minaur, Krygios, Tiafoe and co. better strike while they've got the small window of opportunity cause these Italian Stallions are soon going to make them irrelevant bystanders.

For sure, Sinner, Musetti and Nardi will be mopping up slams, possibly Zeppieri and Cobolli too, and Berrettini and maybe Sonego will be there to pick up the scraps that fall from the master's table.

I think only Auger-Aliassime and maybe Molleker, and young Spanish hopeful Carlos Alcaraz Garfia will be able to go toe to toe with this generation of Italians-the rest may as well go home.

Read it and weep guys.
 
Errani/Vinci?! Really now?! I just can't take you seriously...
Listen junior,

Errani/Vinci formed one of the most formidable doubles partnerships in history, reaching 8 slam finals in a 3 year period and winning five.

Both were top tenners in singles, and both reached a slam final. Vinci became a hero to the whole world when she crushed Serena's dreams.


But they were only the appetizer, Musetti, Sinner, and Nardi are the main course.
 
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The future of tennis? Bah. Present day tennis is Italian, and has been since 2004 when the Fabster turned pro
True, but Fognini is one of the biggest under-achievers. To be honest, I see the same sort of mental nuttiness with Musetti but he has yet to mature.

Hopefully Pennetta and the FOG's son will grow up to be the GOAT, but I suspect it will be a spoilt child with no motivation to follow in the hallowed footsteps of Federer and Schiavone.
 

DSH

Hall of Fame
Listen junior,

Errani/Vinci formed one of the most formidable doubles partnerships in history, reaching 8 slam finals in a 3 year period and winning five.

Both were top tenners in singles, and both reached a slam final. Vinci became a hero to the whole world when she crushed Serena.


But they were only the appetizer, Musetti, Sinner, and Nardi are the main course.
what do you think about the performance of Berrettini in Wimbledon and especially against Federer?, and,

What do you think will be the impact on Italian tennis that from 2021 to 2025 the WTF is played in Torino?
:unsure:
 

Aussie Darcy

Bionic Poster
New York Times did an article on the rise of male tennis players in Italy back in May.

23 Italian men are in the top 250 of the ATP rankings, the most of any country.
Three of them were seeded at Roland Garros, giving Italy the same number as traditional powers like Spain and France.

This wave of Italian men comes in the wake of the recent retirements of Italian women from a golden generation that inspired the growth of the sport in the country. The burgeoning group of men was cultivated by the tennis federation’s decision to build up the number of lower-level tournaments in Italy so that young players could develop domestically, which is less draining mentally and financially.
The effort has borne fruit over the past year. Marco Cecchinato was a surprising French Open semifinalist last year, but is now in the top 20. Matteo Berrettini, the No. 29 seed in Paris, has won two ATP titles in the past year. Lorenzo Sonego, ranked 74th, reached the quarterfinals of the Monte Carlo Masters in April.

Fognini, ranked 12th, has been the best of the bunch. He won the Monte Carlo Masters, the most prestigious title for a man from his country in decades.

If Fognini, 32, reaches even the third round, he will have a chance to become the first Italian in the top 10 in more than four decades, since Corrado Barazzutti fell from that echelon in early 1979.

“Before,” Fognini said, “it was only women winning everything.”

He knows that well, being the second-most-accomplished player in his own household. His wife, Flavia Pennetta, won the 2015 United States Open, and was part of the golden generation that included Roberta Vinci, who stunned Serena Williams and finished runner-up to Pennetta at that U.S. Open; Francesca Schiavone, the 2010 French Open champion; and Sara Errani, the 2012 French Open runner-up. All four reached the top 10, and all played on the Fed Cup teams that won three titles from 2006 to 2010.

Now, the women’s side has gone from feast to famine, with only one player in the top 150.

Angelo Binaghi, the president of the Federation of Italian Tennis, said the downturn on the women’s side was cyclical and exacerbated by “a series of coincidences,” including injuries to promising young players.

The veteran coach Riccardo Piatti, who has his own tennis center in Bordighera, said the men owed the women for their current successes.

“Those girls, I think they changed a lot in the mentality of the Italian federation, and in Italian players,” Piatti said. “The final of Pennetta-Vinci in New York was amazing for us, and then everybody believed they can do that — coaches, too.”


Italians have also had success in junior tennis — Lorenzo Musetti won the Australian Open boys’ title in January — but Piatti said that the best young players, like 17-year-old Jannik Sinner, benefited from forgoing the junior circuit and entering the Futures and Challenger events.

“My idea is: The good ones, put them immediately with the good players,” Piatti said.

And Italy offers its young players more opportunities to play against seasoned opponents than any other country of comparable size. In the most recently updated schedules (lower-level events are planned and confirmed on a rolling basis), Italy hosts 19 Challenger tournaments, second only to the 27 in the United States.

“You don’t have to travel too much when you’re young,” Berrettini, 22, said. “It also helps because it’s cheaper: You can bring your physio, your trainer, your coach. If you go to China, you don’t have enough money for that. For the young, it’s really good because you can get a lot of wild cards. I got a lot of wild cards, which was helping a lot not just to earn points, but to earn experience.”

In a sign of their enthusiasm for development of young male players, the federation hosts the ATP’s annual Next Gen exhibition event for players 21-and-under, as well as a play-in event for Italians. That partnership led to a bigger responsibility: In 2021, the ATP Finals will move from London for a five-year stint in Turin.
Binaghi also cited the federation’s free-to-air television network, SuperTennis, for growing the popularity of the sport across the country, and singled out a government minister, Giancarlo Giorgetti, for helping direct funding toward tennis.

Despite the success stories, not all is well in Italian tennis. In November, the doubles players Potito Starace (10 years) and Daniele Bracciali (lifetime) were barred by the Tennis Integrity Unit after convictions on match-fixing charges. Cecchinato also was once convicted by the federation of match-fixing charges, only to later avoid punishment when the federation missed a deadline during his appeal process.https://www.nytimes.com/2019/07/30/dining/the-fulton-review-pete-wells-jean-georges.html?fallback=0&recId=1OlEEgPtyf5gpre08YHvBVtQhmw&locked=0&geoContinent=OC&geoRegion=QLD&recAlloc=story&geoCountry=AU&blockId=home-featured&imp_id=963731558
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/05/29/sports/french-open-italian-men.html

The article was posted back in May but was fascinating to see that Italy was the country that had the most players in the top 250 and on top of that, they held the 2nd most amount of Challenger tournaments, only behind the States.
 
I go back to corrado barazzutti, antonio zugarelli, the panatta brothers, pozzi, and pistolesi. Adriano panatta was the coolest. Cooler than even ilie nastase.
For me, it is exciting to see matteo berretini, and marco cecchinato. Fabio fonyeenee is good in patches, too.
 
what do you think about the performance of Berrettini in Wimbledon and especially against Federer?
I heard he wasn't very good against Schwartzman. I only seen his match against Fed where he was like a deer in the headlights and an embarrassment. It's a learning experience and he will perform better next time on center court. I can see him reaching a couple of slam finals a la Anderson if he continues to work hard.

What do you think will be the impact on Italian tennis that from 2021 to 2025 the WTF is played in Torino?
:unsure:
All the funding that goes into it will be repaid with ticket sales, sponsors, TV deals etc. but I believe that most of the profits, which was around 30 million last year, go to ATP. It will benefit Turin's tourism industry most of all. I'm not sure how much will be left over to invest in tennis in Italy. It will give more exposure and create some more new young fans, who will go on to pick up a racket. I believe tennis is growing in popularity in Italy, as a spectator sport anyway. Ultimately however, better coaching and facilities at a low-level is where the improvements need to be made. The federation have built up lower-level tournies in recent year as the article Darcy posted states.

Since 2015, Italy has tried to create a more widespread organization of the youth system. Boys were subjected to the impact of professionalism, as well as being away from home, so more decentralized structures were created and organized in relation to age groups: centers for those aged from 9 to 11 years; centers for children aged 12 to 14, centers for those over 17 etc. Subsidies are paid for worthy players from 18 to 24 years. The Federation in recent years has encouraged Italian clubs to increase the number of fast courts too, in order to better support technical growth and create all-court players. Around 90% of Italian tournaments are not held on a fast surface.There are only around 1000 fast courts; clay comprises the majority.

Silvia Farina Elia says the young girls playing tennis have poor technique. A general problem seems to be the importance given to the result at a young age by pushy parents, at the expense of future planning and development. Cecchinato, for example, in his early teens was nothing special. He wasn't even the best player in Sicily, but became the first Italian male RG semi-finalist since the seventies.

All in all, things are looking up, and barring injury, Sinner and Musetti are going to be the greatest, mark my words.

(And if they turn out to be mugs, be a doll and don't bump the thread to shame me.)
 
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DSH

Hall of Fame
I heard he wasn't very good against Schwartzman. I only seen his match against Fed where he was like a deer in the headlights and an embarrassment. It's a learning experience and he will perform better next time on center court. I can see him reaching a couple of slam finals a la Anderson if he continues to work hard.


All the funding that goes into it will be repaid with ticket sales, sponsors, TV deals etc. but I believe that most of the profits, which was around 30 million last year, go to ATP. It will benefit Turin's tourism industry most of all. I'm not sure how much will be left over to invest in tennis in Italy. It will give more exposure and create some more new young fans, who will go on to pick up a racket. I believe tennis is growing in popularity in Italy, as a spectator sport anyway. Ultimately however, better coaching and facilities at a low-level is where the improvements need to be made. The federation have built up lower-level tournies in recent year as the article Darcy posted states.

Since 2015, Italy has tried to create a more widespread organization of the youth system. Boys were subjected to the impact of professionalism, as well as being away from home, so more decentralized structures were created and organized in relation to age groups: centers for those aged from 9 to 11 years; centers for children aged 12 to 14, centers for those over 17 etc. Subsidies are paid for worthy players from 18 to 24 years. The Federation in recent years has encouraged Italian clubs to increase the number of fast courts too, in order to better support technical growth and create all-court players. Around 90% of Italian tournaments are not held on a fast surface.There are only around 1000 fast courts; clay comprises the majority.

Silvia Farina Elia says the young girls playing tennis have poor technique. A general problem seems to be the importance given to the result at a young age by pushy parents, at the expense of future planning and development. Cecchinato, for example, in his early teens was nothing special. He wasn't even the best player in Sicily, but became the first Italian male RG semi-finalist since the seventies.

All in all, things are looking up, and barring injury, Sinner and Musetti are going to be the greatest, mark my words.
I really like the way and the culture of Italians.
We hope that the quality of male tennis players will continue to grow; To see a future winner of a Major would be historical (with Pennetta's permission) and would produce an important growth in the Italian tennis industry.

Continua il percorso positivo!
Il lavoro darà risultati prima o poi.
;)
 

Djokodalerer31

Hall of Fame
Listen junior,

Errani/Vinci formed one of the most formidable doubles partnerships in history, reaching 8 slam finals in a 3 year period and winning five.

Both were top tenners in singles, and both reached a slam final. Vinci became a hero to the whole world when she crushed Serena's dreams.


But they were only the appetizer, Musetti, Sinner, and Nardi are the main course.
Doubles tennis is for bums! LOL Except when you are either Bryan Brothers or Williams Sisters...
 
https://eu.usatoday.com/story/sports/tennis/2019/05/15/italys-men-are-starting-to-matter-in-tennis-like-its-women/39481581/

Sinner compared to Djokovic and er...Gasquet.

Players like Matteo Berrettini and Lorenzo Sonego are in the process of breaking through, while teenagers Lorenzo Musetti and Jannik Sinner represent a bright future.

All that success has resulted in record ticket sales at this week's Italian Open — and some of the Italians could make a run at the French Open, which starts May 26.

"The men haven't reached this level in 40 years. So people are not coming only to see (Rafael) Nadal or (Serena) Williams, they're coming to root for the Italians," Italian Tennis Federation president Angelo Binaghi said. "It's one thing to have 10,000 spectators. It's another thing to have 10,000 fans.

"This boom in men's tennis is the next step in a process that began with the golden age of the women followed by the development of SuperTennis," Binaghi added, referring to the federation's highly successful TV channel . "A minute after Fognini won Monte Carlo I called the ticket office and they had already noticed a jump in sales."

The women's golden age that Binaghi was referring to includes the four Fed Cup titles that Italy won between 2006 and 2013 with a team featuring Francesca Schiavone, Flavia Pennetta, Roberta Vinci and Sara Errani. Schiavone (2010 French Open) and Pennetta (2015 U.S. Open) also won Grand Slam titles, while Vinci (2015 U.S. Open) and Errani (2012 French Open) were Grand Slam finalists.

Corrado Barazzutti captained those winning Fed Cup teams and remains Italy's Davis Cup captain. He's also Fognini's personal coach and played on the 1976 Italy team that won the Davis Cup — making him the link between generations.

"A lot of it is because the skill level of our coaches has improved," Barazzutti said. "We're growing together with the players. And the federation is doing its part by assisting these coaches and players."

Musetti won this year's Australian Open boys' title at the age of 16 — and he's not even the country's most promising young player. That title belongs to Sinner, the only 17-year-old in the top 400 of the rankings at No. 263.

In Sinner's first Masters Series match on Sunday, he rallied past American veteran Steve Johnson in three sets. That made Sinner the youngest player to win a match at the Italian Open since Goran Ivanisevic 30 years ago.

"He's the real deal," said Riccardo Piatti, Sinner's coach. "I've coached a lot of players and he's certainly one of the best I've seen," Piatti told The Associated Press, adding that Sinner has "similar potential" to top-ranked Novak Djokovic and Richard Gasquet, who he also coached to the top 10. "But we need to give him some time."

Piatti attributed the success of the home players to the proliferation of Challenger and Futures tournaments — the level just below the pro tour — around Italy.

At No. 12, Fognini is within striking distance of becoming the first Italian man in the top 10 since Barazzutti achieved the feat in 1979.

"Fabio has always been a talented player and now he's got another component: He's got a Grand Slam champion in his family," Piatti said, referring to Pennetta, Fognini's wife. "Flavia understands him, assists him and encourages him. It's definitely a favorable situation."

The Italians' rise has also coincided with the addition of two big tournaments. The Next Gen ATP Finals, a year-ending event for the world's top 21-and-under players, has been held in Milan since 2017. And from 2021-25, Turin will host the ATP Finals for the season's top eight singles players and doubles teams, taking over from current host London.

"I think this will change the whole thing in Italy," coaching great Nick Bollettieri said in Rome. "When you have three or four young ones that will inspire the other young ones to keep going."

When Turin was recently awarded the ATP Finals, Binaghi announced that he expects an Italian to be competing in the tournament come 2021.

"We've got players in the right position to make it there," Barazzutti said. "Why not?"

Sinner is like Djokovic, Murray and grapefruits being thrown into a melding machine- thus he emerges with even bigger balls than Schiavone.
 
In an interview to SportFace, Jannik Sinner's coach Riccardo Piatti commented on the 17-year-old Italian's potential.

"I understood he was different than the others, he rules the point. I see a future in him. Looking at all the players evolving, we can say he can improve all his shots. Nadal, Federer and Djokovic, at Sinner's age, did not have the same quality. It's clear that he needs to understand that he has to work a lot.

Goals are far away, you need to work a lot and play in order to catch them. Jannik is very smart, he lives in an environment where in the past people did not know him, now they know. In Lyon, he played with the same guy he had won the day before and he lost.

I insist on bringing him where there are better players than him in order to make him learn how to play against those guys and cope with them. He has a big potential and he needs to know it."
Rankings at around Sinner's age:

Fed-106
Nadal-42
Djokovic-142
Murray-381

Rankings at around Musetti's age:

Fed-129
Nadal-49
Djokovic-188
Murray-533

It's amazing how fast Nadal progressed. So both Musetti and Sinner are ahead of MuryGOAT in development so far. It's looking good.
 

stringertom

Bionic Poster
I am a full fledged Sinner and have been so since watching him win the Bergamo Challenger this winter. Come and join the party with fellow inmate @Baseline_Bungle in The Sin Bin thread located in PMR section of the forum, @Italian Stallion . There’s also the “It’s A Matteo of Time” thread celebrating Berrettini.

I lived in Vicenza for three years as a youth so it’s a natural for me to celebrate Forza Azzurri on the tennis court.

Fa Bene, Amico!
 
Rankings at around Sinner's age:

Fed-106
Nadal-42
Djokovic-142
Murray-381

Rankings at around Musetti's age:

Fed-129
Nadal-49
Djokovic-188
Murray-533

It's amazing how fast Nadal progressed. So both Musetti and Sinner are ahead of MuryGOAT in development so far. It's looking good.
Fognini is the future of Italian tennis.
 

TheGhostOfAgassi

Talk Tennis Guru
Rankings at around Sinner's age:

Fed-106
Nadal-42
Djokovic-142
Murray-381

Rankings at around Musetti's age:

Fed-129
Nadal-49
Djokovic-188
Murray-533

It's amazing how fast Nadal progressed. So both Musetti and Sinner are ahead of MuryGOAT in development so far. It's looking good.
FORZA!

Time to ride Italian Stallions!

We need more fun in tennis, we need more Italians doing well!

If Italy and Milano (lol) can get the Winter Olympics that soon after Torino, there should be more money in the pot for Italian tennis too ;)
 

Mugu

Rookie
I go back to corrado barazzutti, antonio zugarelli, the panatta brothers, pozzi, and pistolesi. Adriano panatta was the coolest. Cooler than even ilie nastase.
For me, it is exciting to see matteo berretini, and marco cecchinato. Fabio fonyeenee is good in patches, too.
nobody was cooler than Nastase. the most talented human to ever pick up a tennis racket. unfortunately, he was also insane.
 

Mugu

Rookie
being one myself, i'd love to see the Italians dominate. just don't see it happening. too much pasta and vino... and then there's le donne e la dolce vita...
 
https://www.atptour.com/en/news/lexington-challenger-2019-sinner

The 17-year-old is quietly climbing the ATP Race To Milan standings this year, rising to 12th with his latest breakthrough on Sunday. Sinner added a second Challenger title with a 6-4, 3-6, 6-4 win over Alex Bolt at the Kentucky Bank Tennis Championships. His triumph in Lexington marked his first since February, when he lifted his maiden trophy on home soil in Bergamo.
The teen is making his presence known in 2019 and etching his name in the history books in the process. He became the 11th player aged 17 & under to win multiple titles on the circuit. He is also the third do to so in the last five years, joining Taylor Fritz and Felix Auger-Aliassime.
Sinner is the youngest player in the Top 200 of the ATP Rankings, rising 59 spots to a career-high No. 135. With his 18th birthday less than two weeks away, he is already making a serious push to crack the Top 100.
Most Titles Aged 17 & Under
Sunday's final was a rematch of a classic encounter at Wimbledon qualifying last month, which saw Bolt advance 2-6, 7-5, 12-10 after a marathon third set. There was plenty of drama once again, as the Aussie denied a pair of match points at 5-3 in the third set, before Sinner found the finish line two games later.
The #NextGenATP star spoke with broadcaster Mike Cation following Sunday's final...
You've had two marathon matches against Alex. The first at Wimbledon had a different outcome. How did you change the result today?
For me, it was not easy to play him again. I thought I played very well at Wimbledon and I lost. I also played quite good here today and I won, so maybe I was mentally stronger this time. That's the reason I won today. At the end, I was serving 5-3 up and had two match points. It was not easy to get it done, but I think I did a very good job.
There aren't too many 17-year-olds with two Challenger titles. Rafa, Novak, Delpo. Some of the best in the world. What does it mean to get your second already before your 18th birthday?
I'm not thinking too much about these kinds of things. We are just trying improve my game every week. That's the first goal. Of course, if you win it's better. If you're winning two Challengers, that means you're playing very good tennis. I think I've done a great job with that.
This is great preparation for US Open qualifying. How are you going to make sure your body is ready and in the best shape for the Open?
I am going to play Aptos and then take one week off. Maybe I will go to Cincinnati, but just to practise. If not, we'll go directly to New York to rest for a few days before practising again.
Is your foot ok? You were limping a bit yesterday.
It is better and we've done a good recovery. The match against Duckhee Lee in the quarter-finals was very tough physically. But in the end, I'm feeling fine.
Your serve percentage was up and down all week long. At around 50 per cent for the tournament. Have you been working on that? It's something that you seem to be doing in practice the last two weeks.
Yes, we are focusing on the serve mostly. That's the point I have to improve more than anything. Of course, young players have to improve everything, including the forehand and backhand, but in my case it's the serve. I'm tall so I think I can serve better. There are matches that are better and some that are worse, but this is tennis.
You have to play again in two days. A first round against Maverick Banes in Aptos. Are you going to be able to celebrate at all while heading out to California?
Maybe tomorrow I'll take the day off. A nice dinner and some mini golf tonight [laughs]. I enjoy these kinds of things. I'll just try to switch off now and I hope I can play good in Aptos.
 
Fun fact:

When the Pontiff comes out onto the balcony at the Vatican gesticulating with his hands, those poor paisanos think he's giving them his blessing when in fact he's actually waving his hands and shouting: . "hey-a you guineas!....get off-a tha' lawn!!!!"
 
Federer practices with Sinner

I think Sinner is a good player. I practiced with him outside of Monaco after the Laureus Awards last year in February. I saw him when he was young. He made some nice improvements, obviously gotten stronger. He seems like a good guy. In terms of maybe technique, it's a similar approach to a strong baseline game. I mean, from Sinner we have still so much more to come.
 
Musetti:

What is the main difficulty you faced in the transition from the junior to the professional world?
"I believe the biggest difficulty is maintaining a high level for two or three hours, depending on how long a match lasts. There were first rounds, in Bergamo for example, where I alternated moments in which I played really well with terrible basses: in some key moments I gave up a little psychologically. It is part of the growth path, however ".
Many have wondered why you gave up Wimbledon jr.
“I made the decision not to play Wimbledon because we saw that I had achieved my goals in the junior career, or become number one and win a Grand Slam. We have therefore chosen to interrupt the activity under 18 to climb the ranking as quickly as possible: we are confident and happy with what we have done so far, see the Milan semi-final, and even in this environment I am doing well ”.
Have you given yourself some goals to reach by the end of the year?
"In terms of ranking, I don't think that winning points goes hand in hand with playing well. Obviously I hope to grind points and victories, having the certainty of being able to count on the WC in which at the Australian Open, since it is up to those who win the junior tournament the previous year. Let's say that the hope is to have a place in the top-300 as soon as possible: I hope to do it quickly, I want to grow ”.
 

UnderratedSlam

Hall of Fame
Immigrant Aussie, and yes, at least two touches of immigrant Canadian.
Fyuturr is Boolshyeet russian for sure.
Oh, and molto HalfGreek malakas, no question.
Sampras started the Greek ball rolling, ever since then these Greek kids have been promising a lot... but not yet delivering that much.

Also, plenty of Serb/Croat players, often playing as immigrants for western countries, there's a small army there too.
 

Pmasterfunk

Semi-Pro
All in all, things are looking up, and barring injury, Sinner and Musetti are going to be the greatest, mark my words.

(And if they turn out to be mugs, be a doll and don't bump the thread to shame me.)
But isn't this the whole point of internet forums?

Fun fact:

When the Pontiff comes out onto the balcony at the Vatican gesticulating with his hands, those poor paisanos think he's giving them his blessing when in fact he's actually waving his hands and shouting: . "hey-a you guineas!....get off-a tha' lawn!!!!"
My family tells that exact joke, but in french.

Immigrant Aussie, and yes, at least two touches of immigrant Canadian.
Fyuturr is Boolshyeet russian for sure.
Oh, and molto HalfGreek malakas, no question.
Well, Canada really is a country of immigrants (I don't know of any first nations tennis players), but if we're going to classify players as "non-immigrant", Canada hasn't produced much. Let's look at the "immigrant" team: Raonic, Pospisil, Polansky, Peliwo, Bester, Shapovalov, Aliassime, Andreescu, Marino, Fernandez, Dancevic, Wozniak... remove Bouchard (and we all want to forget about her), and you have to go back a decent amount of time for Sébastien Lareau, but then you still had Nestor, Niemeyer, Jeyaseelan, Hy-Boulais, Kelesi...

I can't speak for all of Canada, but my experience in the Montreal region was that tennis has always been much more diverse than local demographics.

Now, back on topic, those italian guys, yes, very exciting times, indeed, yes. I don't see Berrettini winning slams, but I do like his game and personality. I haven't seen much of Sonego, but to be honest his grunting annoys me (like any player grunting really). The highlights against Kyrgios were entertaining, and he seems fairly likable. Sinner's been getting traction on the forum, but I haven't actually seen him play. It's great to see young players come out of Italy.
 
Sinner makes main draw of slam for first time and will face Stan The Man who is about to be emasculated and given a sex change operation.

At the age of eighteen, Sinner is the youngest male Italian to take part in the main draw of a slam since Diego Nargiso at AO 1988, who was seventeen and ten months.
 

TimHenmanATG

Professional
No offence, but the harsh reality is that Italians - like the French - are good at populating the ATP's Top 50 or 100, but are invariably never in serious contention when tournaments get down to the business end.

Fognini is a prime example of this phenomenon. He's now in the Top 10, but is still as much of a non-factor in major tournaments as he has ever been.
 

Mainad

Bionic Poster
No offence, but the harsh reality is that Italians - like the French - are good at populating the ATP's Top 50 or 100, but are invariably never in serious contention when tournaments get down to the business end.

Fognini is a prime example of this phenomenon. He's now in the Top 10, but is still as much of a non-factor in major tournaments as he has ever been.
Slipped down to #11 this week. Winning Monte Carlo (and beating Nadal along the way) will probably be the big highlight of his career.
 

TimHenmanATG

Professional
Mainad said:
Slipped down to #11 this week.
Ok, but my point still remains. This is a guy who has been one of the top players for the last decade. Even if we retrospectively imagine that the Big 4 never existed, can you seriously imagine a historical situation in which Fognini would have been a serious challenger at a Grand Slam tournament?

Mainad said:
Monte Carlo (and beating Nadal along the way) will probably be the big highlight of his career.
Out of the 16 biggest tournaments in tennis, Monte Carlo ranks 15 out of 16. The only reason why it's not bottom of the pile is because Paris-Bercy still exists.
 

James P

Hall of Fame
Even if we retrospectively imagine that the Big 4 never existed, can you seriously imagine a historical situation in which Fognini would have been a serious challenger at a Grand Slam tournament?
In that situation, I could. I don't think he'd necessarily be an 8 time Slam winner, but he might have picked up one or two.
 

hoodjem

G.O.A.T.
Italian women's tennis went through a golden era over the last couple of decades with Italian Stallions Schiavone, Pennetta, Errani and Vinci winning Fed Cups, slams, reaching slam finals and generally just kicking ass. It's probably going to go through a slump now with very few young females emerging apart from Cocciaretto.

Not to worry, because the future of men's tennis is Italian. Not since the days of Panetta, Pietrrangelii, Barrazutti and Bertolacci have we seen the likes of this army of stallions stampeding through the singles rankings.

Under twenty-five in the the top 60 are Sonego and Berrettini. They're promising, but here's where the real guns come out to play.

At 197, is 17 year-old Jannik Sinner, so named because he don't go to confession-he's too busy kicking ass. This guy is the next Andy Murray, only without the strain of losing DNA. He's younger than everyone ranked above him. He has excellent court coverage, defensive skills, mental fortitude and tactics. He's got a cool forehand, backhand, volleys and serve.This ginger stallion is going right to the carrot top.



At 375, is the Australian Open junior champion, 17 year-old Lorenzo Musetti. He's a bit of a headcase at the moment, but he's only young. Imagine Gasquet with Fognini's sex appeal, then being slapped in the face by Roger Federer with a baguette-that's what it's like to compete with this stallion on the court.He has the touch, tweeners, drop-shots, lobs, tweener lobs, tweener drop-shot lobs and angles. He has a killer backhand.He's the most stylish player since Federer. It's only a matter of time before he puts it all together and starts crushing the opposition.


At 382, it's 17 year-old Guilio Zeppieri, semi-finalist at Australion Open juniors with a strong forehand. He looks a bit slight and small but he's apparently six-foot, so he's just lulling his opponent into a false sense of security with optical illusions-a short sign of a future magician on the court.


If that doesn't whet your appetite and you think those guys will bomb, then not to fear because Luca Nardi is the next stallion on the horizon. He has been compared to Federer already by the former number 42 Stefano Pescosolido. He's already ranked number 60 in juniors.

Born in August 2003, Nardi has been one of the best players of his generation, winning his first U12 title in 2015 in Padova and adding two more in the U14 category in 2016, still at the age of 12! Luca conquered Les Petits As Mondial Lacoste, the biggest event in the world for U14 players, beating Hamad Medjedovic in the title match, and he was almost unbeatable during the season, winning the U14 title in Pavia and his first ITF junior crown in Tirana as a qualifier, playing only his second event in the oldest category. He become the second player from the 2003 generation who won a match on a pro circuit at the age of 14.


Then there's the young fringe guys like Forti, Moroni, Baldi, Mager and possibly 17 year-old junior Flavio Cobolli who recently reached the quarter-finals of the junior French Open, only to be defeated by the Wimbledon junior champion, all of which will help ensure Italy will be a force in the Davis Cup for years to come.

In five or six years, once these guys have developed, the big three will be gone or on the way out and it'll be the start of the golden age of Italian tennis the like of which the world has never seen.

Zverev, Tsitsipas, De Minaur, Krygios, Tiafoe and co. better strike while they've got the small window of opportunity cause these Italian Stallions are soon going to make them irrelevant bystanders.

For sure, Sinner, Musetti and Nardi will be mopping up slams, possibly Zeppieri and Cobolli too, and Berrettini and maybe Sonego will be there to pick up the scraps that fall from the master's table.

I think only Auger-Aliassime and maybe Molleker, and young Spanish hopeful Carlos Alcaraz Garfia will be able to go toe to toe with this generation of Italians-the rest may as well go home.

Read it and weep guys.
Wow! Quite the Italianate rhapsodic paean.
 
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TimHenmanATG

Professional
In that situation, I could. I don't think he'd necessarily be an 8 time Slam winner, but he might have picked up one or two.
Which major tournaments throughout the last decade do you think that Fabio would have had a serious chance of winning (sans the Big 4)?
 

James P

Hall of Fame
In that situation, I could. I don't think he'd necessarily be an 8 time Slam winner, but he might have picked up one or two.
Which major tournaments throughout the last decade do you think that Fabio would have had a serious chance of winning (sans the Big 4)?
I'm not saying he for sure would have won the French by now, but he certainly would have had a better shot if the talent (at the top) was more mediocre. But you're right that he may have never have done it, regardless.
 

TimHenmanATG

Professional
James P said:
I'm not saying he for sure would have won the French by now, but he certainly would have had a better shot if the talent (at the top) was more mediocre. But you're right that he may have never have done it, regardless.
Which major tournaments would he have had a chance in?

You mention the French Open, but (even without the Big 4), I highly doubt that PEAKgnini would have historically been in contention at Roland Garros.
 
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