The J011yroger Guide to Racquet Selection.

Discussion in 'Racquets' started by J011yroger, Oct 7, 2007.

  1. J011yroger

    J011yroger G.O.A.T.

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    Well, here it is, and maybe a bit overdue. This thread will detail my thoughts on racquet selection, the best racquet for you, midsize, oversize, weight, swingweight, stiffness, blah blah blah.

    ***Disclaimer*** this is my own personal opinion, and that is what I am sharing with you. I am not saying it is the final word, the word of god, I am not saying that I am right, and dissenters are wrong. Please read with an open mind, think this information through, and comment if you wish.

    This post is geared more towards the intermediate player, as beginners will have bigger fish to fry than racquet selection, and won't really have the stroke mechanics to take full advantage of the differences in frames. While advanced players should have a darned good idea of what they should be using. But I would like to think that most players could glean some insight from this thread.

    If you have your racquet already picked out, and want some insight on how many you should ideally have please check this thread http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=127992.

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    Ok, the first think I want to address is brand. Pretty much every brand out there makes good quality racquets. The only ones I would steer people away from would be the wierd ones like Blackburne, Power angle, etc.

    Most all companies make competing racquets in all ranges so once you figure out about what you are looking for, you can demo a few frames from a few brands, and pick the one you like best.

    The single most important thing about a racquet is that you like it. You absolutely must like the way the racquet feels to you, the way it plays, the way it looks. If a racquet feels too stiff, too rattly, too dead, too light, too heavy, the grip doesn't feel right, you hate the color, or it hurts in any way when you are hitting, then it isn't the right racquet for you. This is so immensely important. If you don't like the racquet, or if you have to think at all about it, then you will not be able to play to your fullest. You should just be able to pick up your racquet and play with it.

    The single most important attribute of a tennis player is consistency. You absolutely must keep the ball in play at all costs. Every shot you miss you forfiet the point. Until you get to about #200 in the world tennis is about one more ball. The difference as you go up in level is the quality of that ball, which will be addressed in the next point. So many times you hear people say "When I hit it right the racquet is awesome" what they leave out is the part about hitting it wrong and losing the point. You need the racquet that lets you hit 8 or 9 good shots out of ten, not the racquet that lets you hit one or two phenominal shots and 6 mediocre ones. If you need to do something out of the ordinary (Swing faster, swing slower, more topspin, less topspin, hit earlier, hit later.) in order to produce good results with a frame, then your consistency is going to suffer. Now, it is OK to pick something if you intend to grow into it, but be realistic, if you have been playing for 20 years once a week, take lessons once a month, are you really gonna develop that wicked western forehand you want anytime soon? Or is a more realistic goal just to add a bit of topspin to your game? Make sure you have the time and inclination to play the frame, and develop the game that suits it before you go and shell out the coin. The old saying fits about excersising and loosing weight. "It is a lot easier to buy the shorts than to do the situps".

    After Consistency, the next most important thing in tennis is DEPTH. Let me say that again. DEPTH once more incase you weren't paying attention Depth above all. You can hit the most wicked topspin, you can hit the ball 100mph, it won't do you a lick of good if you are dropping them into the service box. (Assuming we all know that I am not talking about angle winners, drop shots, and other shots hit short to facilitate winning a point.) Your racquet should allow you to hit the ball deep and when I say deep, I mean beyond the service line at the minimum, preferably in the back third of the court. You should be able to hit deep AT WILL AND WITHOUT EFFORT in all types of baseline rallying. If your balls are landing short, you need more power, you can get it from weight, string, stiffness, headsize, wherever you choose, but get it from somewhere.

    With reguard to racquet weight, and racquet Swingweight. I advocate playing the heaviest racquet that you can play well with. This weight is different for different people. Some people may find anything over 10.2oz to be too heavy, some people will play with a 14oz racquet. What does this mean. The primary factor that you should be able to judge ideal racquet weight/swingweight by is being able to get around on the ball. Out of all the people you play with, or intend to play, or want to be able to play with in the near future, you must be able to get around on the vast majority of their balls. What I mean by get around, is hitting the ball with your full normal swing, and not feeling rushed, and hitting the ball ON TIME. Anyone can smoke feedballs with any racquet, anyone can convince themself that they are playing great when they try out their new racquet against Aunt Thelma, and her moonballs. When you are in competition, when you are on the run, when you are playing in the wind, when you are playing on a lousy surface, when your opponent is hitting behind you, can you get the racquet around on the ball, and hit it on time? Or are you constantly late? Anyone can hit a good shot when they have plenty of time to set up, and line the shot up. If in match play, when you are on the run if you are late on the ball too often, your racquet is probably too heavy/too high swingweight. If your ball is deep in a casual rally, but it shortens up when you are under pressure, on the run, your racquet is probably too heavy/too high swingweight.
    The second factor, which should only be a factor if the racquet is WAY TOO HEAVY is fatigue. If you feel tired after swinging the racquet during a hitting session, or after serving three sets, then it is WAY too heavy. Once again it is ok to buy something with a little extra heft if you like it, and have the intention of building up some endurance, but be realistic. Are you really going to put in the effort? A 12oz racquet doesn't build up your forearm muscles while it is sitting in your bag, you need to go out and hit balls with it. . . lots of them. Don't buy the racquet with the intention of growing into it if you are not prepared to put forth the effort.

    When discussing weight you will hear the argument that a racquet can't be too heavy for you because women and children played with wooden racquets that weighed way more back in the day, and Sampras learned to play with wood, and he turned out OK, so you just must be a sissy if you can't play with a racquet waying Xoz. This argument is complete and utter HOGWASH (Yea I would have said something else in an unmoderated forum.) They played with heavy wood back when that is what there was. Ballspeed was NOWHERE NEAR in the league that it is now. The ball traveled slower, so you had that much more time to get around on the ball, and didn't have to put nearly as much work on the ball to maintain depth when you were countering a slower less spinny ball. I personally hit a very very heavy ball, and have had many a club player come and tell me "When we hit, I just can't get the ball past the service line". If you can't get around on the majority of balls from the people you play with, you need less weight.

    Davy Crockett did ok with a musket, but I'll be damned if I am gonna wade into battle with one in 2007. Sure you could shoot someone dead with one, but given the choice I'll be taking that AR15 into battle thank you very much. Heck I can play high 3.0 tennis with a corn bristled broom (Much to the dismay of the local high school JV Team.) But that doesn't make it a good idea.

    On headsize. Play with what you feel comfortable with, what you can hit the sweetspot on regularly. If you are having trouble finding the sweetspot on a regular basis, then the sweetspot is too small. Nuff Said. Headsize is also one of the areas you can get more power from.

    (Continued)
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2007
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  2. J011yroger

    J011yroger G.O.A.T.

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    (Continued from above)

    Power Vs. Control. This is a big one, a HUGE source of misunderstanding. I can not begin to tell you the number of men, and juniors who hit balls long at about 7MPH and say that they need a racquet with less power and more control since they are hitting the ball long. People don't seem to grasp the concept that if their ball lands where it runs out of steam and dies, and drops to the ground, that it is NOT the racquet's fault. If you are constantly hitting balls long, but are not hitting them any or much harder than your fellow players, then you need to look within yourself for the problem, not at the racquet. You don't need a racquet with less power, you need to learn how to hit the ball in the court. Part of depth is forcing your opponent back, and if your ball lands where it drops out of the air because it has no more forward momentum, then you are not forcing anyone back. If you find that you have to hit that way in order to keep the ball deep, then I suggest trying out a more powerful racquet. Every racquet on the planet requires a certain amount of effort from the player in order to hit the ball deep and with good spin, and every racquet puts in a certain amount of help. The more work the racquet does, the less you have to do, and therefor the less control you have over the outcome of the shot. The less work the racquet does, the more you have to do, and therefor the more control you have over the result of the shot. The danger lies in two places, you selecting a racquet that doesn't do enough work for you, and you not having enough to put in on your own where you end up comming up short. Or the other end of the spectrum, you picking a racquet that puts a lot into the shot, and you wanting to put a lot in yourself, and ending up with too much. Hence the generic guides on the back of the racquets detailing long fast strokes and short compact strokes.

    One last thing, now that you have determined how much power you need, you can get it from a few places.

    1) Weight. Heavier racquets produce more power IF YOU CAN SWING THEM FAST. The amount of power that weight adds is proportional to how fast you can swing them. If you take a racquet weighing 10oz, and a racquet weighing 11oz, all else being the same, if you swing them with the exact same speed, the 11oz racquet will have more power. However, if the added ounce of weight makes you swing the 11oz racquet slower then the weight didn't accomplish much, and you may well end up hitting the ball less powerfully with the heavier racquet. Remember, the key is being able to get around on the ball, above all else.

    2) Stiffness. Stiffer racquets are more powerful, but carry the risk of arm injuries. If you have arm troubles seek out less stiff racquets, and get your power elsewhere. Beamwith contributes to stiffness, so it didn't get its own bullet.

    3) Headsize. Larger headsize, more power, bigger sweetspot, less misshits.

    Now, items 2&3 are fairly static in adding power, what I would like to call inherent power of the racquet, while item 1 is variable depending on how fast you can swing the racquet. This explains why higher level players have the feeling that they are "Maxing out" racquets of certain lighter weights, where no matter how much harder you swing the ball doesn't go much faster, or at least reaches a point of diminishing returns.

    4) String Tension. To be covered in detail in the upcomming J011yroger guide to string selection, but worthy of mention here. Looser strings, more power, tighter strings, less power.

    Now, the goal is to tinker with these 4 items until you are generating a nice deep ball with good speed and spin with your normal swing you should neither feel that you must swing harder, nor temper your normal swing to get the ball to go where you want it. You should not be thinking about the racquet, you should swing your normal swing and have the ball go where you want it.

    As a closing thought. And possibly the most important thing of all. 99% of the time, it isn't the racquet, it is the guy holding it. If you are trying to improve as a tennis player find something you like, find something that is close in spec to what you need, buy a bunch of them, and hit the practice courts.

    If you are constantly buying racquets to add topspin to your game, make your serve better, or fix your backhands. I got news for ya. :D It doesn't work that way. There is no secret to this game, no shortcut. Just hard work, and good instruction.

    That is about it, I will add more/clarify if some parts seemed unclear or if I prattled on/repeated myself.

    J

    Here is an annex about string pattern open v. closed because many people ask about this.

    An open pattern will give you more bite on the ball, will have a hotter stringbed, will be less directionally accurate, will break more strings, and the ball will launch at a slightly higher angle off the racquet face.

    Lots of people generalize that flat hitters are more suited to dense patterns, and topspin players are more suited to open ones.

    I don't really feel that way, I am more on board with the thought of seeing what your ball does with your current racquet, and comparing that to your ideal.

    If the ball you are hitting is too spinny and landing short or sitting up then try something with a denser pattern, if your ball is flying long because you are not getting enough bite on it for your current stroke to keep it in, then try a more open pattern.

    Spin comes from the player, but the pattern allows you to do what you are already capable of, or it amplifies or mutes what you already have.


    Here was my last big post about this, figured I would tack it onto the end.
     
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2008
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  3. Topaz

    Topaz Legend

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    Oh sure...where was this superfabulous guide this time last year?!? ;)

    Seriously, thanks for putting all that up there.
     
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  4. Milano

    Milano Rookie

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    wow, nice...time to go through and read it, thanks.

    Sticky?
     
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  5. J011yroger

    J011yroger G.O.A.T.

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    In my head, but that is a scary place in there.

    J
     
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  6. samster

    samster Legend

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    Jolly, I gave you 5-stars on the post. Excellent, just excellent. Every crazy person with more than 50 rackets (ie. me) should read this.
     
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  7. samster

    samster Legend

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    I have spent lots of money and energy trying all kinds of racket and you know what I play best with? A used, probably 5+ year old Prince Precision Response Titanium I bought from the forum here for $60. Crazy.
     
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  8. J011yroger

    J011yroger G.O.A.T.

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    Well from what is sounds like by CC's description you are pretty handy with it :)

    Seriously though, all the technical stuff the companies press is just BS, once you sort the specs out, and like the way it feels, game on.

    P.S. I remember that the Prince Precision Equipe was the hot ticket back then, amongst the 5.0 crew. Ever played one? I never have but it is from around the same time as the response.

    J
     
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  9. tennis939

    tennis939 Rookie

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    man J if i had read this two years ago
    i would of been better off in tennis

    well amzing post!
    thanks a lot =]
     
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  10. blubber

    blubber Rookie

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    Good advice.

    Be honest with yourself people, you'll play better tennis. Heavy racquets are very tempting - they feel so good when you smash the ball. It isn't until the speed of play picks up that you realize you're putting yourself at a disadvantage.

    If you play better with a lighter frame, admit it, and play with it. You can always add lead.

    Find a decent racquet and stay with it.
     
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  11. Klatu Verata Necktie

    Klatu Verata Necktie Hall of Fame

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    Good job, Jo11yroger. Very thoughtful and insightful post. I especially enjoyed your take on power vs. control.
     
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  12. Sixpointone

    Sixpointone Professional

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    Great write up! It is very informative and incredibly well written. I am certain that the info you shared will help many.
     
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  13. julianoz

    julianoz Semi-Pro

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    I just read the first and last sentences, can someone post a cliff notes?
     
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  14. BounceHitBounceHit

    BounceHitBounceHit Legend

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    Hoist the main-sail, find the breeze, and head toward Tennis Nirvana.
    Jo11yRoger, our very own pirate of the USPTA, has shown us the light! ;)

    Nice job, Jo11y.

    CC
     
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  15. BMG

    BMG Rookie

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    Fantastic guide to racquet selection and it puts many factors in perspective. I especially like, and agree with, the prioritizing of consistency and depth as important characteristics in choosing a frame. Also, I think many people including me look for different racquets to supply different characteristics such as power, control, spin capability...when much of this can be handled by technique and string setup. Great job J011yroger!!!! (and thanks!)
     
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  16. BounceHitBounceHit

    BounceHitBounceHit Legend

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  17. autumn_leaf

    autumn_leaf Hall of Fame

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    umm do u mean more control?

    and great guide; i always had a heavier is better attitude, maybe i'll try for a lighter racquet next time.
     
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  18. J011yroger

    J011yroger G.O.A.T.

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    Yes, I did. Edited it to read correctly. Thanks for the pickup.

    J
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2007
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  19. J011yroger

    J011yroger G.O.A.T.

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    Heavier IS better, right up till it is too heavy. Then heavier is worse.

    The key is honestly evaluating your skillset, and physical abilities to find out what the right weight is for you.

    J
     
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  20. Gmedlo

    Gmedlo Professional

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    Now whenever one of my friends (3.0) wants to switch to a ps85 because all other racquets have too much power, I can point out this post to them instead of arguing with them for 20 minutes... Thanks! :)
     
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  21. J011yroger

    J011yroger G.O.A.T.

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    Good luck with that. If someone is stubborn and not listening, or doesn't want to learn, then hey, just keep beating him.

    The thing is that if your friend is a 3.0, and is happy playing 3.0, and can compete against other 3.0 players when he is using a PS85, then there is absolutely nothing wrong with him using what he is happy with.

    I remember when I was down at a park by my house, and one of the older guys who I am friendly with was complaining that players on his 3.5 team that he captains got bumped to 4.0. He said these guys have be 3.5 players for 10 years, we all play together on wednesday nights, and now these 2 guys can't be on the team anymore.

    I stood there stunned, but it just showed me that people play for different reasons. The most important thing in the world to me tennis wise is improving, and secondly winning matches and performing well in tournaments/rankings. But these guys just play in their league to be with their friends, have a good time, get away from their wives for a couple of hours and who are you or I to tell them that they could play better with another bat.

    J
     
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  22. BounceHitBounceHit

    BounceHitBounceHit Legend

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    And that is THE issue. Finding the 'top' of your static weight and SW curve, above/beyond which you begin to lose batspeed. ;) CC
     
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  23. joe1987

    joe1987 Semi-Pro

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    Bravo Roger!
     
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  24. herosol

    herosol Professional

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    okay. i have one question. i don't usually realize the heft of my k90 during matches, the only time i realize the heft is during practice with my coach.

    he's brutal. left to right. swinging atleast a good 200? balls during like two hours. and seriously my arms are tired, i cannot even bring my arms to the like "ready to go" stance.

    though i would say sometimes during matches, if i am playing someone whos running me around, the heft starts to kick in.

    so the question, do i need to start looking at something lighter even though the only times i feel the heft of the k90 is when i am quite fatigued from alot of physical activity?
     
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  25. ShiroRm

    ShiroRm Rookie

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    why not simply go to gym?
     
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  26. 0d1n

    0d1n Hall of Fame

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    Very insightful post, a pleasure to read some nice and "down to earth" opinion on racket selection (some/most people on this forum should read it 2,3 times at least...and then take a break and read it again!).
    I agree with pretty much all points. Thanks for taking the time.
     
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  27. keithchircop

    keithchircop Professional

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    Very good thread.
     
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  28. J011yroger

    J011yroger G.O.A.T.

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    Well the question is, do you want to be able to compete with higher level players who force you like that. Like I said in the guide, if you are getting fatigued, then that would lead me to believe that the racquet is FAR, to heavy.

    Try this, find someone who's game you really admire, someone a little better than you, that you would like to play against competitively in the future. And play a practice set. Count the number of times you were late on a shot, including return of serve. Keep this mental tally, and at the end of the set, look at the number honestly, and see if they are acceptable or unacceptable to you.

    It is a huge misconception that being able to play with a heavy racquet means swinging it and not having your arm get tired. While the truth is that if it is slowing down your racquethead speed it is hurting your game, even though you don't feel tired.

    You kind of answered your own question with the way you asked it.

    To me it read.

    "Hey J, do you think I need a different racquet? Mine is totally awesome when I play people who don't challenge me, and are easy to beat, but when my opponent pushes me hard, or I train hard, during the times when I need it the most, it lets me down."

    J
     
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  29. J011yroger

    J011yroger G.O.A.T.

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    Because while physical training is quite important, going to the gym will do very little to help you play better with a heavier racquet.

    J
     
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  30. madmanfool

    madmanfool Semi-Pro

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    I disagree 100%. Going to the gym can do wonders if you want to play with a heavier racquet. I'm the living proof;)
     
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  31. 0d1n

    0d1n Hall of Fame

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    Ability to play WELL with a heavy racket is AT MOST 20 percent physical and AT LEAST 80 percent technique.
    I've seen 50-55 kg's juniors handling Prestige's just fine, and 80-90 kg STRONG adults not being able to do it.
    In short...most people who muscle the ball and are not the incredible Hulk are NOT going to be able to play for 3 hours with a 350 - 360 grams racket (strung, overgrip ..etc). Most 16 years old juniors who have fluid, relaxed strokes WILL be able to do it.
     
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  32. keithchircop

    keithchircop Professional

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    ShiroRm and madmanfool,
    I find anything below 11oz to be too unstable for me to use effectively. That said, one ounce is 28g. You don't need the gym to swing 28g faster, you need better technique. Someone who finds 28g more to be too heavy to just hold in his hands for 3 sets has a serious strength problem.

    J011y,
    I think you should go in more detail about swingweight. A 13oz racquet can have a SW of 310, and an 8oz racquet can have a SW of 340. All other factors constant, which one would you find easier to use?
     
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  33. madmanfool

    madmanfool Semi-Pro

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    Ah i understand it better now. I have good technique, but i lacked a little stamina. Strokes were easy, but my shoulder got tired from serving. The gym solved that problem easily.
     
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  34. hrstrat57

    hrstrat57 Hall of Fame

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    buy 3

    Wow, what a lot of work in this well thought out post. Wise words of wisdom throughout.

    Nice play!

    I would add one thing....once you complete your play testing and find the friendly frame buy 3!!!

    Solidify your commitment to building your game around your new special friend...remove the doubt about the racquet and go play.

    do as I say not as I do
     
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  35. ShiroRm

    ShiroRm Rookie

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    J011y, I respect your opinion, but I take inspiration from my experience. I started to use an Rdx 500 (that surely isn't the heaviest existing mid) last year and I was really struggling at the beginning, playing against opponents a bit stronger and faster than me: I was late often (lack of footwork), giving short balls; and I wasn't effective in defence, even because of the racquet's weight.
    But after a regular training, I started moving a lot better, managing to arrive to the ball properly and the Rdx started to seem light to me, allowing me to react as I did with my previous lighter racquet.

    I agree with you: if you're still at the beginning, you need to learn technique first; while, if you have already learnt it and are playing tournaments, for example, you need the proper racquet NOW.
    But, reading your posts, it seems that we're "doomed" to have always the same amount of strenght and fitness during our life: we can increase them, very easily, instead
     
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2007
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  36. keithchircop

    keithchircop Professional

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    It's not like a 3.0 will never reach 3.5 because he uses a 12oz racquet. Technique will improve regardless of racquet. If you practice a lot but use a racquet that's not the best there is out there for you, you technique will STILL improve. For instance, how can a "bad" racquet interfere with improving your footwork, preparation, anticipation? Those things come with practice, not with a racquet.

    But, you'd win more matches RIGHT NOW if you didn't use a racquet that's not the best there is out there for you.
     
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2007
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  37. ShiroRm

    ShiroRm Rookie

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    yes, even with gym (cardio) practice. Speaking about gym, I was referring to various forms of training, not only to weight lifting
     
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2007
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  38. J011yroger

    J011yroger G.O.A.T.

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    Like I have said it isn't about fatigue so much. It is about being on time. And it is not about strength. I know guys who can bench 350lbs (More than double what I weigh) who can't get a prestige around on time against a 4.5 player. Whereas my spindly 6'3" 165lb self can get a 13.6oz N/K90 around on a 110+ serve. You have to be able to swing at your natural swingspeed and hit the ball on time. Everyone is different.

    They go hand in hand, so I lump them together, but Swingweight is really what you have to look at. For the same stroke, the one with the higher swingweigh would be harder to use. But here is the rub. You may see a 9.8oz grannystick with a swingweight higher than a 12+ oz mid. So despite the fact that the grannystick has a higher swingweight, you get more zip from less of a swing than you would with the mid. So you need to swing the mid faster, and longer than the grannystick, which despite mids lower SW makes it harder to use.

    Kind of hard to explain clearly, but I hope it made sense.

    J
     
    #38
  39. J011yroger

    J011yroger G.O.A.T.

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    In the guide, I said on at least two seperate occasions that it was perfectly fine to buy a frame that you intend to "Grow Into" Infact I reccomended to certain player types in the quoted block at the end to do just that. The only thing I cautioned was that you should honestly evaluate yourself and make sure you were going to be able to put in the required amount of effort to grow into the racquet.

    Just like if you told me you were gonna buy a $1,200 Armani suit, and you were gonna get it 2 sizes smaller than you are now because you are going to hit the gym and start eating right. I would advise you to make darn sure you were going to be putting in the work so you don't let a $1,200 suit look like a baloney skin on you, when you would look much better into something that was the right size.

    If someone has a goal of becoming a 5.0 player, and they take weekly lessons, and play 2 hours a day. Then great.

    If someone says they wanna be 5.0 and play saturday mornings with the old guys down at the park (No offence to the old guys down at the park). Then they had best do some soul searching before throwing away $200.\

    J
     
    #39
  40. J011yroger

    J011yroger G.O.A.T.

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    #40
  41. ShiroRm

    ShiroRm Rookie

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    yes, I was speaking about a player (not a beginner) seriously intentioned to improve his game, of course, not about foolish people;-)
    and the game improves even being in good shape: speed and power don't come out of technique and practice on court only
     
    #41
  42. herosol

    herosol Professional

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    hmm. funny you should say that. i play one of my friends who has excellent shots, maybe doesn't move as well, but his very technique puts me running around.

    and just like you said, im late alot, service returns, groundstrokes, etc.
    i see. so its more then just feeling tired. hmm.
    I think this is a queue for a possible racket change :[
     
    #42
  43. hrstrat57

    hrstrat57 Hall of Fame

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    #43
  44. J011yroger

    J011yroger G.O.A.T.

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    Thanks bro. Wait until you see "The J011yroger Guide to Drunken Doubles"

    J
     
    Christian Olsson likes this.
    #44
  45. Topaz

    Topaz Legend

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    Is this available for pre-order?
     
    #45
  46. nickarnold2000

    nickarnold2000 Hall of Fame

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    A very informative thread and I don't wish to hijack it in anyway but, J011yroger, what's your take on most pros now using 98+ head size?
     
    #46
  47. J011yroger

    J011yroger G.O.A.T.

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    Ya know I honestly don't know enough about the current top tier pro game, and pro racquet selection to have an intelligent informed opinion on that. So anything I would throw out would just be speculation on my part, or me repeating something else I heard someone else say.

    The highest level people I have ever hit with/played were 2-300 in the world at their best, and pretty much used what they like and what they felt comfortable with. And honestly I was so busy getting clobbered that I didn't think to strike up a conversation about racquets.

    When I visit Roman to get the [J] Factors under way, I will ask some questions, and relay what he says to you guys if you are curious.

    But for right now, I am not qualified to answer that question.

    J
     
    #47
  48. paulfreda

    paulfreda Hall of Fame

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    When the Babolat PD first appeared on the scene, more than half the girls at the US Girls National in San Jose played with one [circa 2000]. It was almost hard to believe Babolat did not pay them. Stiff frames for more power which is what many/most girls need.

    But when Roddick appeared on court with one, that was a huge surprise.
    The game has been raising the bar continually for years now.
    I think the move to 98's and 100's is part of that progression of raising the power/spin/control present at the highest levels. They also reduce mishit percentages for those with whippy technique.

    Note that poly and kevlar string has rendered these stiff frames controllable with the added spin they produce.

    JMHO
     
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2007
    #48
  49. shojun25

    shojun25 Professional

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    Great guide. Simple, but its in-depth. Thanks for sharing your thoughts.
     
    #49
  50. LPShanet

    LPShanet Banned

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    I think it might be a good idea to set up these boards so that your post at the head of this thread comes up when any of the stupid racquet selection threads on these boards is clicked.

    "What racquet do I need to suddenly give me a powerful topspin backhand?" "All Prince racquets are for beginners and flat hitters."

    Please.
     
    #50

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