The 'obsession' with pro's setups ...

langdon0555

Semi-Pro
Seems like wasted energy to me! lol

Really, it's like...who cares.

I feel the obsession also falls in line with people who are caught up in the 'the grass is always greener on the other side' syndrome. Always looking/demoing for what's the best stick for them.
 

corners

Legend
A sincere question ... Why?

Just trying to understand, that's all.
Putting aside fanboyism, well aside, there is:

1. Racquet manufacturers sell what sells, but not necessarily what allows a player to play at his highest level. Light racquets sell, have sold for many years, while pros play with much heftier sticks. Some players would like to know what pros are playing so that they might have a better idea of what a high-level setup really is. 375 grams and 370 swingweight, as someone like Delpo plays, may not actually be optimal for someone only 5'11" and growing, but such a player could scale it and experiment with 350g/350 swingweight, for example, knowing that he's on the right track.

2. Since racquet companies openly commit fraud and false advertising by lying to the public about what racquets their pro players really use, there is a natural curiosity, among those players who know about this "paintjob" subterfuge, to discover what the companies are hiding.

3. A small minority of players have an interest in the nuances of racquet weight distribution. If one mimics a tennis stroke with, say, a claw hammer, there is a certain natural timing to such stroke. Compared to this, a uniform beam will swing with a quite different timing or "feel." Although the differences between racquets are more subtle than those between a very head-heavy hammer and a 2x4, the way mass is distributed does have an effect on the timing and feel of the swing. If a player is interested in building a stroke similar to some pro's, it is often of interest to try such a stroke with that player's racquet, or one weighted like it.

4. The "Heavy Ball" Many players believe that to hit the "heavy ball" of lore and legend, a heavy racquet must be employed. (Or, more correctly, a racquet with a high swingweight.) But how heavy is heavy in today's game? It used to be that even puny 5'7" pros, like Rod Laver, used 14 ounce sticks. But the game is different now, as are the strokes. What is heavy enough nowadays to produce a heavy ball, but still light enough to whip around for angle-enabling topspin? Again, the sticks the pros use provide reference points.
 
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Booger

Hall of Fame
When I pull out my RF97 (strung w/ champion's choice @ 59/56 obv), it's like Roger Federer himself is guiding my racquet. It adds 10mph to all my shots, increases spin by at least 20%, increased my NTRP ranking by 2 levels, and I can suddenly speak swiss German.

If it's good enough for the Golden Eagle, it's good enough for me. I bought two because I couldn't stand to be without an RF97 should I ever break a string. How mad are you right now?

 

ednegroni

Rookie
When I pull out my RF97 (strung w/ champion's choice @ 59/56 obv), it's like Roger Federer himself is guiding my racquet. It adds 10mph to all my shots, increases spin by at least 20%, increased my NTRP ranking by 2 levels, and I can suddenly speak swiss German.

If it's good enough for the Golden Eagle, it's good enough for me. I bought two because I couldn't stand to be without an RF97 should I ever break a string. How mad are you right now?

Win. I just ordered 2 pair, I'll now speak german AND french.
 

ARKustom93

Professional
When I pull out my RF97 (strung w/ champion's choice @ 59/56 obv), it's like Roger Federer himself is guiding my racquet. It adds 10mph to all my shots, increases spin by at least 20%, increased my NTRP ranking by 2 levels, and I can suddenly speak swiss German.

If it's good enough for the Golden Eagle, it's good enough for me. I bought two because I couldn't stand to be without an RF97 should I ever break a string. How mad are you right now?

Actually, exactly the type of answer I was looking for .... Unfortunately, you're not being serious, so ...;)
 

Ferbious

Banned
I dont own one but i started hitting with it and i could hit clean 1 handed backhands just as hard

i have a 2 handed and i was just messin garound with the demo but its exrwmwly well balanced for 1handed backhands

my tfight 325 is awful for 1 handeds but the rf97 seems perfect, which leads me to suspect it might just be a lesser quality mold of federers racquet

considering they built the line after they had a racquet for him, so they very well could have just mass produced the prototype sin lead of what fed uses
 

seekay

Semi-Pro
When I pull out my RF97 (strung w/ champion's choice @ 59/56 obv), it's like Roger Federer himself is guiding my racquet. It adds 10mph to all my shots, increases spin by at least 20%, increased my NTRP ranking by 2 levels, and I can suddenly speak swiss German.

If it's good enough for the Golden Eagle, it's good enough for me. I bought two because I couldn't stand to be without an RF97 should I ever break a string. How mad are you right now?

Putting power pads on the main strings inside the throat will up everything by another 5%.
 

jersey34tennis

Professional
so i can try to copycat their strokes as best as i can and see if i can get any benefit out of it to add to my game. i try to emulate players strokes and see if i can consistently do them (never happens except for like santoro junk slices) and add to my pea-shooter arsenal
 

ARKustom93

Professional
so i can try to copycat their strokes as best as i can and see if i can get any benefit out of it to add to my game. i try to emulate players strokes and see if i can consistently do them (never happens except for like santoro junk slices) and add to my pea-shooter arsenal
Nah, you're not obsessed, just naturally curious ... which is a good thing.
 

snoflewis

Hall of Fame
A sincere question ... Why?

Just trying to understand, that's all.
in any industry, people want to use what the pros want to use.
the majority of us TW forum members are posers and want to know that we're using the "true" setup of pros, so we try to use what the pros use.

problem: we can swing what they swing, but we can't swing like they swing.

as a result, we develop big biceps/triceps, are always late to the ball, shorten our backswing to compromise, and can never get enough racket head speed.

so while our swings look nothing like the pros because we try to copy their equipment and compromise technique, we have the satisfaction of knowing that our equipment matches the pros, and our outfits color match.

this is the true satisfaction of playing tennis. hope it makes sense now.
 

ChicagoJack

Hall of Fame
Putting aside fanboyism, well aside, there is:

1. Racquet manufacturers sell what sells, but not necessarily what allows a player to play at his highest level. Light racquets sell, have sold for many years, while pros play with much heftier sticks. Some players would like to know what pros are playing so that they might have a better idea of what a high-level setup really is. 375 grams and 370 swingweight, as someone like Delpo plays, may not actually be optimal for someone only 5'11" and growing, but such a player could scale it and experiment with 350g/350 swingweight, for example, knowing that he's on the right track.

2. Since racquet companies openly commit fraud and false advertising by lying to the public about what racquets their pro players really use, there is a natural curiosity, among those players who know about this "paintjob" subterfuge, to discover what the companies are hiding.

3. A small minority of players have an interest in the nuances of racquet weight distribution. If one mimics a tennis stroke with, say, a claw hammer, there is a certain natural timing to such stroke. Compared to this, a uniform beam will swing with a quite different timing or "feel." Although the differences between racquets are more subtle than those between a very head-heavy hammer and a 2x4, the way mass is distributed does have an effect on the timing and feel of the swing. If a player is interested in building a stroke similar to some pro's, it is often of interest to try such a stroke with that player's racquet, or one weighted like it.

4. The "Heavy Ball" Many players believe that to hit the "heavy ball" of lore and legend, a heavy racquet must be employed. (Or, more correctly, a racquet with a high swingweight.) But how heavy is heavy in today's game? It used to be that even puny 5'7" pros, like Rod Laver, used 14 ounce sticks. But the game is different now, as are the strokes. What is heavy enough nowadays to produce a heavy ball, but still light enough to whip around for angle-enabling topspin? Again, the sticks the pros use provide reference points.
Hi corners, well said as usual. Agree to all that stuff. I would add there's some evidence indicating something roughly stated as a positive placebo effect occurs when amateurs are handed equipment that they believe was once used by a professional athlete. But here is the kicker ... in the studies, the amateurs performed measurably better when they were told they were using equipment once used by a pro. (even the though it was not pro equipment) The theory is that when the test subjects believed they were taking superior equipment into the field of battle, that self induced conviction created an elevated ability to cope with stress, and a heightened sense of confidence. Yes, it might be "all in your head" so to speak. But no leap of faith required to understand that the stuff that happens up in your grey matter, has real implications where sporting events are concerned.

Quote [1] : " The superstitious belief that using a professional's equipment will improve one's own performance is very popular among amateur athletes. This particular belief may be more than just a superstition, however. According to a new study [2] in the open access journal PLoS ONE, amateur golfers who believed they were using a professional golfer's putter not only sunk more putts than others, but also perceived the hole to be bigger."

For the new study, Charles Lee and his colleagues at the University of Virginia's Perception Lab recruited 41 undergraduates, all of whom indicated having previous golf experience and enthusiasm for the sport. The participants were randomly split into two groups and the researchers told those in one group that they had obtained a putter once used by the professional golfer Ben Curtis.

All of the participants were then shown a putting matt. They were first asked to estimate the size of the golf hole on the matt, using the elliptical tool in Microsoft Paint, and then used the same putter to take 10 putts on the matt. Those who believed they were using the professional golfer's putter consistently perceived the golf hole to be larger than those in the other group. Furthermore, the belief improved their performance – they also sank more putts than the others
."

-- [1] "A professional athlete's equipment is positively contagious ", The Guardian
http://www.theguardian.com/science/neurophilosophy/2011/oct/24/psychology-neuroscience

-- [2] Putting Like a Pro: The Role of Positive Contagion in Golf Performance and Perception
http://www.plosone.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pone.0026016
 
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ARKustom93

Professional
This is getting interesting ...

Odd though, that none of the numerous folks afflicted with this quite common condition have chimed in, so far ...
 

corners

Legend
Yup. Well said as usual. Agree to all that stuff. I would add there's some evidence indicating something roughly stated as a positive placebo effect occurs when amateurs are handed equipment that they believe was once used by a professional athlete. But here is the kicker ... in the studies, the amateurs performed measurably better when they were told they were using equipment once used by a pro. (even the though it was not pro equipment) The theory is that when the test subjects believed they were taking superior equipment into the field of battle, that self induced conviction created an elevated ability to cope with stress, and a heightened sense of confidence. Yes, it might be "all in your head" so to speak. But no leap of faith required to understand that the stuff that happens up in your grey matter, has real implications where sporting events are concerned.

Quote : " The superstitious belief that using a professional's equipment will improve one's own performance is very popular among amateur athletes. This particular belief may be more than just a superstition, however. According to a new study in the open access journal PLoS ONE, amateur golfers who believed they were using a professional golfer's putter not only sunk more putts than others, but also perceived the hole to be bigger."

For the new study, Charles Lee and his colleagues at the University of Virginia's Perception Lab recruited 41 undergraduates, all of whom indicated having previous golf experience and enthusiasm for the sport. The participants were randomly split into two groups and the researchers told those in one group that they had obtained a putter once used by the professional golfer Ben Curtis.

All of the participants were then shown a putting matt. They were first asked to estimate the size of the golf hole on the matt, using the elliptical tool in Microsoft Paint, and then used the same putter to take 10 putts on the matt. Those who believed they were using the professional golfer's putter consistently perceived the golf hole to be larger than those in the other group. Furthermore, the belief improved their performance – they also sank more putts than the others
."

-- "A professional athlete's equipment is positively contagious ", The Guardian
http://www.theguardian.com/science/neurophilosophy/2011/oct/24/psychology-neuroscience

Putting Like a Pro: The Role of Positive Contagion in Golf Performance and Perception
http://www.plosone.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pone.0026016
Hey Jack! So, since the Pro One has no world class endorser, are you considering a switch to someone's paintjob to get in on this placebo effect? Or, with knowledge of paintjobs, would the contagion not stick? Reminds me of a fellow student long ago, talking about her study strategies to get into medschool, who said, "For me, studying all night all night seems to work, as long as I get a short nap before the test." And then, seeing my face, "Don't tell me if I'm wrong; if it's a placebo I don't want to know."

In any case, I would think the contagion would wear off after a while, but maybe not. Paintjobs might have virtue after all.

It doesn't look like the researchers at Virginia found any Ben Curtis fans among the subjects. I bet the effect size would have been greater. But now we're getting into fanboyism. :)
 

HRB

Hall of Fame
A sincere question ... Why?

Just trying to understand, that's all.
I've always wondered why players are quick to adopt the players RACQUET SPECS yet quick to ignore they are physically nowhere close to the PLAYERS "SPECS"! I liken it to the "gear heads" in my other favorite sport of mountain biking...they are constantly looking, and dropping big bucks to shave a gram or 2 on parts and components...and yet 80% do nothing to address the extra POUNDS hanging over their waistlines!!!! It's laughable.

If you are a young, lean, fit, world class athlete, with above average hand eye coordination, above average agility, above average drive and determination, above average strength to size ratio then BY ALL MEANS, mimic a pro's set up! However, I conservatively estimate that represents less than 1% (if that) of folks around these parts, me included.

Personally I like heavy static weights north of 12oz...but my extreme headlight set up's make them easy to move for me personally, and they have nothing to do with the Pro's polarized set up's, which I've tried and HATED...just my own personal "wheelhouse" through trial and error.
 
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corners

Legend
This is getting interesting ...

Odd though, that none of the numerous folks afflicted with this quite common condition have chimed in, so far ...
Probably because they sniffed out the trap you'd laid for them:

A sincere question ... Why?

Just trying to understand, that's all.
Sniff, sniff
...quite common condition have chimed in, so far ...
Ah, yes, sincere, just trying to understand, right.
 
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