The Official Angell Users Club

JackB1

G.O.A.T.
I bought second hand TC97 currently at 330g so therefore I desperately need tutorial how to remove some weight out :)
You have to remove the grip and then the pallet to get to the weights. Do a search here for pallet removal. Its pretty easy but take your time so you don't ruin the pallets.
 

7zero

Semi-Pro
You have to remove the grip and then the pallet to get to the weights. Do a search here for pallet removal. Its pretty easy but take your time so you don't ruin the pallets.
I have googled just one sad video about Head pallet removal, am I useless searcher or is it really only source? :D
 

tinyman

Rookie
I have googled just one sad video about Head pallet removal, am I useless searcher or is it really only source? :D
The Angell pallets, assuming an install that was like mine (and how AFAIK was original), the pallets were stapled into the hairpin, at about the halfway point of the handle. You can easily see where the staple is once you take the grip off - remove the staple, and the pallets just come off.

The issue came in that getting down to the staple itself with a pair of pliers isn't exactly easy - I had to remove some material in the pallet to form enough of a wedge shape to get the pliers down in, and around the staple. The staple was pretty far down on both of mine. The pallet wasn't ruined, but you'd need to backfill that wedge to completely restore the shape (not that it's difficult to do that).

Again, assuming an original install, you'll find a series of weights, held in by some sort of glue/adhesive (I looked up the name once, and as usual completely forgot what it was).

When I redid the pallets on mine, I put down a glue spray to try and make it easier to remove, if necessary.

edit - mine are TC95's, I would think it to be similar for all of them.
 

teekaywhy

Professional
You don't have to remove the staple midway on the pallet to remove the pallet. Just pry off the pallet. Then remove the staple. Much easier.
 

Power Player

Talk Tennis Guru
Got to play with the big hitting lefty again. Really awesome for breaking in a new frame because the spin is a lot heavier than most guys and its lefty spin which tails into you on FHs. Good for footwork.

Anyway, I have to say ramping up the tension made a real difference for me ( I went from around 46# to 53#s). The frame is now moving up to more of a Wow experience. Whomever said this racquet was string sensitive was right. I'd venture to say it is tension sensitive. It simply shines with the tension higher than what you may usually use. I think this is due simply to the open pattern. I should have thought of that before - open pattern = higher tension, at least for me.

Not only does the frame feel better with richer feedback, but the cracking sound on serves and groundstrokes is now very very pronounced for me. I was able to stand in and fire back a lot better since I had more control. What I really like about this frame is just like on serve, you can hit more through the ball on one FH and then brush harder on the next and it responds with very heavy spin. That spin caused a lot of unforced errors. So he could not groove on one type of ball. Right when he'd time out my normal FH, I would go a little more western and brush the ball more and it would throw everything off on his timing.

Additionally the frame feels a lot better now with the tension in the 50s. I think just because I can really put a lot into the ball without worrying about launching it, so the flexing of the frame on impact when you really lay into the ball is very very satisfying. I may string up a little tighter next time. Maybe 56#s or so, since the tension will drop anyway in this hybrid.

Its crazy to have a 95 in the mid 50s for me. Just because Im usually high 40s or so. But it works so well that I'd suggest to anyone dialing on strings to just stick with one string and instead focus on your tension. Staying with the hybrid, stringing tighter and not trying full poly yet was a very good decision for me. As a result I had my best session with the frame and I really appreciate the feel of it a lot more now.

Quick add - I had my share of mishits while getting used to the lefty ball. There were zero vibrations or any signs of discomfort. This frame simply does not vibrate at all if you mishit. It's rather awesome.
 

skeeter

Professional
Got a TC100 on the way, thanks to a fellow poster! Looking forward to trying it and seeing what this "Angell feel" is all about :)
Should have it by Tues and will report back impressions shortly thereafter.
Look forward to not only your review by your comparison with the Prince T100P you're playing with now.
 

Gee

Hall of Fame
Got to play with the big hitting lefty again. Really awesome for breaking in a new frame because the spin is a lot heavier than most guys and its lefty spin which tails into you on FHs. Good for footwork.

Anyway, I have to say ramping up the tension made a real difference for me ( I went from around 46# to 53#s). The frame is now moving up to more of a Wow experience. Whomever said this racquet was string sensitive was right. I'd venture to say it is tension sensitive. It simply shines with the tension higher than what you may usually use. I think this is due simply to the open pattern. I should have thought of that before - open pattern = higher tension, at least for me.
Nice to hear your experiences, PP!

I strung my TC95 (18x20) higher (from 22 (mains) /21 (crosses) kg to 24/23 kg) this time as well as I noticed I hit more unforced errors due to a too low stringbed tension when I was playing with new balls. Unfortunately I didn't hit yet with my new strung racket due to bad weather circumstances. So I still can't tell my experiences about this.
 

808

Semi-Pro
808, how do the TC95 63 and 70 differ? Power, control, feel, etc
I'm interested in this too. I have the same specs as 808's 70RA and plan to buy another TC95 later this year but I'm not sure I want another 70 or the 63.
Ive heard it is mostly just feel... the 63ra is like 57-58 strung the flex is noticable but not noodley. RA70 probaly no percievable flex as its about 64 strung... more prostafff 85 like.
I've had a chance to play the 70RA by now, and as Backhanded Compliment already hinted, the only difference between my 63RA and 70RA TC95's is the feel – one has noticeable flex, the other one much less so (I wouldn't quite call it "no perceivable flex", as even at 70RA ungripped/unstrung it's not a super stiff frame in real use).

Both rackets are super solid with no vibrations whatsoever. Control and power are basically the same and the latter can be fine-tuned with strings anyway. I feel I get a bit more spin with the 63RA, but that may come down due to strings. The 63RA has Head Gravity at 21/20, the 70RA VS / Hawk Touch at 23/22. I will probably have all strung with Gravity next time around, as that's been my go-to string for more than a year now, and compare and contrast again. For now I'm happy to have both options in the bag.
 

808

Semi-Pro
You're welcome and sorry for being late, haven't had a chance to play for nearly two weeks now.

In the end the decision between the 63RA and 70RA is purely personal. If you usually prefer stiffer frames, go for the 70 obviously, and vice versa. I think neither one is necessarily better than the other.
 

skeeter

Professional
You're welcome and sorry for being late, haven't had a chance to play for nearly two weeks now.

In the end the decision between the 63RA and 70RA is purely personal. If you usually prefer stiffer frames, go for the 70 obviously, and vice versa. I think neither one is necessarily better than the other.
Thanks for the comparison. Just to confirm, though, the 63RA should be a little higher in SW than the 70RA per previous discussions about the layup of the Angell racquets. Did you find that noticeable, all other variables being equal?
 

808

Semi-Pro
Thanks for the comparison. Just to confirm, though, the 63RA should be a little higher in SW than the 70RA per previous discussions about the layup of the Angell racquets. Did you find that noticeable, all other variables being equal?
Yes, the 63RA feels slightly more substantial, the 70RA swings a bit faster. I did not notice a significant difference in power, though – I guess I'm not as sensitive to swing weight variances as long as it's in my preferred range (or unconsciously compensate with higher racket head speed).
 

Ft.S

Semi-Pro
I have been slowly experimenting with string tensions, going down each time by 1# using VS Touch 16. Starting from 57#, I reached for 53# for one of the racquets (TC97). First time playing with it balls were flying all over and I had to significantly adjust my racquet head angle and swing. After couple of hours, I got used to it, but it just did not feel quite right. So, I measured the tension and it turned out to be at 46.8#. It was playable but not enjoyable for my technique.

So, I wanted to go higher on my other racquet, and asked for 55# (a different stringer). I measured the tension before playing and it came out at 60.2#. Saying I was disappointed is an understatement, so much so that I started looking to get my own stringing machine. The first hour of hitting was like carrying a wooden pallet, no power, no feel, just horrible. I had to play a ladder match, so I picked up the 60# racquet and forced myself to play with it. My precision was just superb, I just had to really put the power into it though. With this setup my unforced errors went down significantly and I won two matches back to back that I was not expected to win. One good news is that even as stiff as 60# feels, I had no issues in my arm or elbow :)

So, it appears I need the control as long as I can manage to put the power in. However here is the big downside: I used to get about 12-14 hours of play from a string, it initially went down to about 9-10 after starting play more singles than doubles. With the 47# and 60# setups, I got less than 5 hours of play with each. Suddenly my string economics equation is turned upside down. Although I really don't want to change my strings if I don't have to, I really enjoy the full nat. gut, I may have to go with a hybrid setup.

I haven't experienced this with other racquets, which is the reason I am posting here. Any thoughts or advice for me?

Thank you.
 

7zero

Semi-Pro
I have been slowly experimenting with string tensions, going down each time by 1# using VS Touch 16. Starting from 57#, I reached for 53# for one of the racquets (TC97). First time playing with it balls were flying all over and I had to significantly adjust my racquet head angle and swing. After couple of hours, I got used to it, but it just did not feel quite right. So, I measured the tension and it turned out to be at 46.8#. It was playable but not enjoyable for my technique.

So, I wanted to go higher on my other racquet, and asked for 55# (a different stringer). I measured the tension before playing and it came out at 60.2#. Saying I was disappointed is an understatement, so much so that I started looking to get my own stringing machine. The first hour of hitting was like carrying a wooden pallet, no power, no feel, just horrible. I had to play a ladder match, so I picked up the 60# racquet and forced myself to play with it. My precision was just superb, I just had to really put the power into it though. With this setup my unforced errors went down significantly and I won two matches back to back that I was not expected to win. One good news is that even as stiff as 60# feels, I had no issues in my arm or elbow :)

So, it appears I need the control as long as I can manage to put the power in. However here is the big downside: I used to get about 12-14 hours of play from a string, it initially went down to about 9-10 after starting play more singles than doubles. With the 47# and 60# setups, I got less than 5 hours of play with each. Suddenly my string economics equation is turned upside down. Although I really don't want to change my strings if I don't have to, I really enjoy the full nat. gut, I may have to go with a hybrid setup.

I haven't experienced this with other racquets, which is the reason I am posting here. Any thoughts or advice for me?

Thank you.
what hybrid setup do you mean - if you are not satisfied with tension maintanance of natural gut, nothing will help you there. Anything else will die even earlier.. if it is about saving the buck then yes, natgut hybrid with some durable poly might be way how to get costs down..
 

Ft.S

Semi-Pro
what hybrid setup do you mean - if you are not satisfied with tension maintenance of natural gut, nothing will help you there. Anything else will die even earlier.. if it is about saving the buck then yes, natgut hybrid with some durable poly might be way how to get costs down..
I am sorry I could not articulate better. I have no complaints about tension maintenance of nat. gut, it is one of the best things and why I use it besides being good to my elbow and touch play. However, in two separate instances and with two different stringers the strings were not done properly and I had the chance to test a wide range of tension as an unintended consequence.

I liked the higher tension setup best; however, now I am only getting 1/2 of play time with the same strings as I did before, so my string costs doubled (~$130-150/mo.). So, part of my inexperienced thinking is that going to a nat. gut on the mains and poly on the crosses would restore the $$$ equation probably; lower purchase costs and longer gut play time, I assume.
 

Power Player

Talk Tennis Guru
High tension is best with gut for sure. Gut poly is one of the best setups you can have in tennis, but the thing is that you will go through mains pretty fast since that is what breaks first.

I would suggest gut poly though because you will cut the cost of gut in half and you don't have to splurge on expensive poly crosses. I used Cofocus, but anything round and slick will do.
 

joohan

Hall of Fame
High tension is best with gut for sure. Gut poly is one of the best setups you can have in tennis, but the thing is that you will go through mains pretty fast since that is what breaks first.

I would suggest gut poly though because you will cut the cost of gut in half and you don't have to splurge on expensive poly crosses. I used Cofocus, but anything round and slick will do.
What I've been led to believe - after reading through a lot of threads - that if the poly is slick and thin you can even re-string the crosses while gut mains are still playable. Sounds pretty awesome...in theory.
 

Power Player

Talk Tennis Guru
What I've been led to believe - after reading through a lot of threads - that if the poly is slick and thin you can even re-string the crosses while gut mains are still playable. Sounds pretty awesome...in theory.
Yeah, but I would not recommend it. I have done it too. Not worth the risk. Also he has a guy who strings his frames, and I doubt any real stringer will do that.
 

7zero

Semi-Pro
Yeah, but I would not recommend it. I have done it too. Not worth the risk. Also he has a guy who strings his frames, and I doubt any real stringer will do that.
I ve done it (for myself) when testing different crosses and it died earlier. It is bit of neurochirurgy/John McClane experience when trying to cut knot on crosses without damaging mains.. :) but in real life yes - it is only for people who string for themselves
 

7zero

Semi-Pro
I am sorry I could not articulate better. I have no complaints about tension maintenance of nat. gut, it is one of the best things and why I use it besides being good to my elbow and touch play. However, in two separate instances and with two different stringers the strings were not done properly and I had the chance to test a wide range of tension as an unintended consequence.

I liked the higher tension setup best; however, now I am only getting 1/2 of play time with the same strings as I did before, so my string costs doubled (~$130-150/mo.). So, part of my inexperienced thinking is that going to a nat. gut on the mains and poly on the crosses would restore the $$$ equation probably; lower purchase costs and longer gut play time, I assume.
1. find good stringer - reliable one who can keep DT on his string jobs in some reasonable tolerance (like me :D)
2. if it happens the stringbed is too lose you can try to put some stringsavers into it - my experience is it makes it tighter to some extent. It extend the life too
 
I am sorry I could not articulate better. I have no complaints about tension maintenance of nat. gut, it is one of the best things and why I use it besides being good to my elbow and touch play. However, in two separate instances and with two different stringers the strings were not done properly and I had the chance to test a wide range of tension as an unintended consequence.

I liked the higher tension setup best; however, now I am only getting 1/2 of play time with the same strings as I did before, so my string costs doubled (~$130-150/mo.). So, part of my inexperienced thinking is that going to a nat. gut on the mains and poly on the crosses would restore the $$$ equation probably; lower purchase costs and longer gut play time, I assume.
yeah Id suggest what everyone else is saying Gut/Poly hybrid... it will stiffen up your stringbed but you can have a lower tension like 53-55lbs and still get string longevity. I personally switched to lower tension poly 4 years ago and it has been great but everyone is different.
 

topspn

Legend
Just ordered another TC100 so my collection will now be 2 TC95s and 2TC100s all at exact specs. I played last week with the TC100 and upped the tension a bit to 52lbs and it was a freaking beast of heavy hitting. I still don’t get the level of precision i get with my 95s but I’m certainly not shy about hitting all out with it. I just aim with better margin and it is giving my opponents fits. The serve is huge and i can generate some really nice movement. Ugh, such a dilemma having these two great racquets
 

JackB1

G.O.A.T.
Just ordered another TC100 so my collection will now be 2 TC95s and 2TC100s all at exact specs. I played last week with the TC100 and upped the tension a bit to 52lbs and it was a freaking beast of heavy hitting. I still don’t get the level of precision i get with my 95s but I’m certainly not shy about hitting all out with it. I just aim with better margin and it is giving my opponents fits. The serve is huge and i can generate some really nice movement. Ugh, such a dilemma having these two great racquets
Can I be Captain Obvious here and suggest a TC97?
 

joohan

Hall of Fame
Can I be Captain Obvious here and suggest a TC97?
Why do you think he needs one? His current setup his giving him hard time choosing what racquet to play with, as they are both(all) pretty awesome...at least that's how I understand it.
 

topspn

Legend
Why do you think he needs one? His current setup his giving him hard time choosing what racquet to play with, as they are both(all) pretty awesome...at least that's how I understand it.
So far I have played more with the TC95 especially singles were I simply gravitate towards the precision. The TC100 is still a lot of fun and I’m finding a little extra tension is giving some additional sharpness and I’m not holding back. The feel for both racquets is really close and I seem to be able to switch between them with ease. It just comes down to a bit more precision vs. a bit more brunt
 

joohan

Hall of Fame
So far I have played more with the TC95 especially singles were I simply gravitate towards the precision. The TC100 is still a lot of fun and I’m finding a little extra tension is giving some additional sharpness and I’m not holding back. The feel for both racquets is really close and I seem to be able to switch between them with ease. It just comes down to a bit more precision vs. a bit more brunt
I guess I know what you're talking about. I play with two racquets currently - Fischer Vacuum Pro Mid and Fischer VT98Pro. Exact same specs/mold/layup with only difference being beam width: VT has a wider, tapered beam, thus the flex is more prominent with the Mid but playing characteristics are very similar. It's quite extraordinary to have the option to go bigger/smaller in head size with almost no adjustment required.
 

Power Player

Talk Tennis Guru
Word has spread a little about this frame so I had a teaching pro come over and ask to use it for a few. He loved it. Loved the pop off the stringbed and how good it felt. Im definitely more happy with it now. First impressions were very positive, but now it is exceeding expectations. So easy to play a big game off the serve and FH.

Just takes maybe a few string jobs and some lead tweaks when you get your first one and then you will be all set.
 

SpinDr.

Professional
Anyone feel like the TC95 lacks twistweight or is unusually jarring/dead outside the sweetspot? My specs are 16x19, 320g, 310mm balance 63ra. Compared to my trusty Pro Staff 90s, I'm not getting the plough and stability I like on off-center hits. I mean, the Prostaff is notorious for its dead upper hoop, but I feel like the TC95 is worse across a larger area outside the sweetspot. My buddy, who plays with a stock Youtek IG Prestige MP, hit with it and this was the first thing he noticed. Might try some lead at 3 & 9 to remedy this.
 
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sma1001

Hall of Fame
What I've been led to believe - after reading through a lot of threads - that if the poly is slick and thin you can even re-string the crosses while gut mains are still playable. Sounds pretty awesome...in theory.
It can be done - if you try it with a poly cross it won't cost you much, and you can see how it feels for you.
 
Anyone feel like the TC95 lacks twistweight or is unusually jarring/dead outside the sweetspot? My specs are 16x19, 320g, 310mm balance 63ra. Compared to my trusty Pro Staff 90s, I'm not getting the plough and stability I like on off-center hits. I mean, the Prostaff is notorious for its dead upper hoop, but I feel like the TC95 is worse across a larger area outside the sweetspot. My buddy, who plays with a stock Youtek IG Prestige MP, hit with it and this was the first thing he noticed. Might try some lead at 3 & 9 to remedy this.
havent noticed that at all and i used to play with a 13oz IGMP prestige and have compared them directly. In fact i have a have a hard time not finding the sweetspot in the tc95. Now my x feel pro 95 needed more twist weight but ive added only a little at 3 and 9 to the tc95... because i am a big returner and always need as much stability as possible.
 

JackB1

G.O.A.T.
Why do you think he needs one? His current setup his giving him hard time choosing what racquet to play with, as they are both(all) pretty awesome...at least that's how I understand it.
Because he said he doesn't get the precision of the 95 with the 100, so obviously the 97 would be something between the two and might work best
 

sma1001

Hall of Fame
Is it just me or is a 97 just too close to a 95, and 98 pretty much a 100? :) Only joking (i think, but i'll now need to think it over...).
 

JackB1

G.O.A.T.
Received my TC100 (70RA) last night and hope to try it out some this afternoon. It comes in at 325 grams all strung with overgrip, so I added another 5 grams to the butt to bring it up to 330.
It appears to be close to even balance, so I hope the swingweight is not too high. I'll check it on the RDC machine today too. I got a grip size 2, but when you put the PU grip on it plus overgrip, it measures the same as all my other 3/8 racquets. I guess the Angell PU grip is thicker than most.
 

Power Player

Talk Tennis Guru
Anyone feel like the TC95 lacks twistweight or is unusually jarring/dead outside the sweetspot? My specs are 16x19, 320g, 310mm balance 63ra. Compared to my trusty Pro Staff 90s, I'm not getting the plough and stability I like on off-center hits. I mean, the Prostaff is notorious for its dead upper hoop, but I feel like the TC95 is worse across a larger area outside the sweetspot. My buddy, who plays with a stock Youtek IG Prestige MP, hit with it and this was the first thing he noticed. Might try some lead at 3 & 9 to remedy this.
I haven't experienced this at all. Is the SW high enough for you? It may just need some lead at 12.The first Angell frame is probably going to be tweaked a little, at least IME.

What strings, what tension?
 

tribesmen

Professional
Anyone feel like the TC95 lacks twistweight or is unusually jarring/dead outside the sweetspot? My specs are 16x19, 320g, 310mm balance 63ra. Compared to my trusty Pro Staff 90s, I'm not getting the plough and stability I like on off-center hits. I mean, the Prostaff is notorious for its dead upper hoop, but I feel like the TC95 is worse across a larger area outside the sweetspot. My buddy, who plays with a stock Youtek IG Prestige MP, hit with it and this was the first thing he noticed. Might try some lead at 3 & 9 to remedy this.
thank you for info.
 

joohan

Hall of Fame
Because he said he doesn't get the precision of the 95 with the 100, so obviously the 97 would be something between the two and might work best
I took it more in a sense he likes playing with the TC95 so much he does not pick up the 100 that often. I don't see any cry for a combination of the two in his posts. Anyway...I guess it's a bit silly trying to explain someones thoughts when that someone can do it himself. My bad, moving on...
 

The_Racketeer

Professional
Just ordered another TC100 so my collection will now be 2 TC95s and 2TC100s all at exact specs. I played last week with the TC100 and upped the tension a bit to 52lbs and it was a freaking beast of heavy hitting. I still don’t get the level of precision i get with my 95s but I’m certainly not shy about hitting all out with it. I just aim with better margin and it is giving my opponents fits. The serve is huge and i can generate some really nice movement. Ugh, such a dilemma having these two great racquets
I wish I had the money to do this. I love my TC95 but I'm really curious what an identically specced TC100 would do for me.

Can I be Captain Obvious here and suggest a TC97?
While the TC95 and TC100 differ only in headsize, the TC97 has a completely different mold and a different stiffness. It isn't a real "in the middle" racquet.

Anyone feel like the TC95 lacks twistweight or is unusually jarring/dead outside the sweetspot? My specs are 16x19, 320g, 310mm balance 63ra. Compared to my trusty Pro Staff 90s, I'm not getting the plough and stability I like on off-center hits. I mean, the Prostaff is notorious for its dead upper hoop, but I feel like the TC95 is worse across a larger area outside the sweetspot. My buddy, who plays with a stock Youtek IG Prestige MP, hit with it and this was the first thing he noticed. Might try some lead at 3 & 9 to remedy this.
Quite the opposite for me. I've found the shots outside of the sweetspot to be very forgiving. I have a tendency to hit my serves high on the hoop and the TC95 doesn't punish me for it.

Received my TC100 (70RA) last night and hope to try it out some this afternoon. It comes in at 325 grams all strung with overgrip, so I added another 5 grams to the butt to bring it up to 330.
It appears to be close to even balance, so I hope the swingweight is not too high. I'll check it on the RDC machine today too. I got a grip size 2, but when you put the PU grip on it plus overgrip, it measures the same as all my other 3/8 racquets. I guess the Angell PU grip is thicker than most.
What were the unstrung specs you ordered? Good luck!
 

SpinDr.

Professional
I haven't experienced this at all. Is the SW high enough for you? It may just need some lead at 12.The first Angell frame is probably going to be tweaked a little, at least IME.

What strings, what tension?
This one is strung with Tourna Black Zone 1.30 at 52lbs. It's my first time using this string. I think the swingweight is fine. Paul estimated that it would be about 330 strung and it feels like that. The Pro Staff definitely has a little heavier static weight and is more headlight. It's also a 90-inch frame, which probably makes it more inherently stable. I'm just finding the edges and, surprisingly, the lower hoop really dead. Keep in mind that due to a herniated disc I'm not actually able to play proper tennis with it right now. Just feeding balls, volleying, and slapping some balls against the wall.

I think I'll string up my other TC95 and do a comparison.
 

joohan

Hall of Fame
Keep in mind that due to a herniated disc I'm not actually able to play proper tennis with it right now. Just feeding balls, volleying, and slapping some balls against the wall.
I think low speed balls are the best to evaluate the stability of the frame. When you hit out, the momentum masks the instability to a large extent, while slow speed strokes such as feeding, precision volleying(both speed and placement - like when teaching) and touch shots fully reveal the amount of stability a frame possesses.
 
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