The Official Angell Users Club

J

joohan

Guest
Even more premium is a Fairway. I use leather grips on all my rackets and the Fairway is second to none.
Fairway is more premium but not more substantial. Volkl is amongst the most substantial leather grips produced.
 
J

joohan

Guest
If I use Volkl leather, do I need to go two grip sizes down instead of one being so thick and I assume heavy. Bear in mind, I always use an overgrip on top of leather for tackiness.

Or is the Volkl leather soft and plush enough where you can't really feel the bevel edges as well as harder leathers and using an overgrip isn't advised? Then might as well use the Wilson Shock Shield.
Regarding grip sizes- not with Angell. Angell grip size 4 feels more like, say, Wilson 3.
 
Regarding grip sizes- not with Angell. Angell grip size 4 feels more like, say, Wilson 3.
really? They seem pretty neutral like prince or dunlop... my A pallets are near matches to my Head prestiges

I do flare the bejeezus of of my handle ends though... because I cant have any bejeezus hanging around there!
 

stephenclown

Professional
really? They seem pretty neutral like prince or dunlop... my A pallets are near matches to my Head prestiges

I do flare the bejeezus of of my handle ends though... because I cant have any bejeezus hanging around there!
Perhaps just different grip shapes as well? I am going with B and it should arrive Monday size 3. Picked size 3 in the hope it would be just slightly smaller than wilsons so will see.
 

beltsman

Legend
I'm back to my Volkls. Not selling my Angells though. I think a lot of people here with the TC100 would love playing with the Volkl 8 line.
 

Kozzy

Semi-Pro
I think the Angell leather is pretty nice. I play without an overgrip a lot of the time and like it. Also, no dampener. Quite nice. Fairway grips are good too.
 

FlyingAce

Rookie
First impressions
TC95 16/19 RA63 310gr/315 balance Leather Grip
Alu power rough 50/47

Had a two hour hit in a stock form and want to highlight the following:

- I was surprised by how open string patter is, was expecting it to be a bit denser. I personally had no troubles with it, since I hit with lots of spin, but my friend who comes from prestige and hits pretty flat, had real problems with keeping balls in play. So I would say this particular racquet requires fast and loose wrist. If you don't have troubles generating RHS, especially with your wrist mechanics, you won't have problems. You have this distinct feeling after certain RHS threshold that balls stays a bit longer on string bad and you could feel how racquet flexes, if you are able get this RHS it is almost imposible to miss - crazy spin, crazy directional control (both vertcial and horizontal)

- As many pointed out, the power you could get with 70-80% is just insane. I was able easily hit bombs from my forehand side with what felt like perfect blend of spin and pace. Ball flies flat and fast and then just suddenly dips and you could see from your side of the court how it jumps right after it touches a court.

-Drop shots. I read here that drop shots are real pleasure to hit with this frame, but I couldn't imagine that it will be so good expecially considering that it was my first time hitting with the frame. I've never hit better drop shots in my life. The amount of control and back spin you get was just amazing. I only missed once, on other ocassions ball landed withing a meter from net and then just died, thanks to exellent back spin.

To sum up. Really liked the frame and I have this impression that it suits my game perfectly. And in all likelihood going to order another one.
It needs some lead tinkering since it is to light at the moment for my taste, but that was expected.
 
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really? They seem pretty neutral like prince or dunlop... my A pallets are near matches to my Head prestiges

I do flare the bejeezus of of my handle ends though... because I cant have any bejeezus hanging around there!
I do the same with my TC 97 A handle. I flared the buttcap about 1/2 cm larger radius with slightly over 2 cm length with I believe leather, and many wraps of overgrip. Feels amazingly secure and stable. Looks ridiculous, but the feel really is pretty great. I find myself reaching for that Angell the most. I know I like it, but want to experiment on different flare sizes to see what fits. How much do you flare yours?
 

zalive

Hall of Fame
Regarding grip sizes- not with Angell. Angell grip size 4 feels more like, say, Wilson 3.
Which Wilson?
I've seen Wilsons with ridiculously small grips, in the shop, and I had few such as well (PS95 2014, PS95s 2015, both amplifeel), which are actually one size smaller than normal (size 3 feels like 2). It particularly bothered me because I like size 4 and I can play fine with 3, but 2 bahh....
Angell B type feels neutral to me compared to normal modern grips, however I get the notion that everything is at least a bit smaller nowadays. Old Head size 3 pallets (TK76) are pretty big, old Volkl pallets size 4 (Powerbridge) were actually huge. Compared to those big size ones Angell B grip is bit smaller.
 
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J

joohan

Guest
Which Wilson?
I've seen Wilsons with ridiculously small grips, in the shop, and I had few such as well (PS95 2014, PS95s 2015, both amplifeel), which are actually one size smaller than normal (size 3 feels like 2). It particularly bothered me because I like size 4 and I can play fine with 3, but 2 bahh....
Angell B type feels neutral to me compared to normal modern grips, however I get the notion that everything is at least a bit smaller compared to nowadays. Old Head size 3 pallets (TK76) are pretty big, old Volkl pallets size 4 (Powerbridge) were actually huge. Compared to those big size ones Angell B grip is bit smaller.
Wilson BLX PS90. Powerbridge 10 mid size 3 is quite big.
 

topspn

Legend
Which Wilson?
I've seen Wilsons with ridiculously small grips, in the shop, and I had few such as well (PS95 2014, PS95s 2015, both amplifeel), which are actually one size smaller than normal (size 3 feels like 2). It particularly bothered me because I like size 4 and I can play fine with 3, but 2 bahh....
Angell B type feels neutral to me compared to normal modern grips, however I get the notion that everything is at least a bit smaller nowadays. Old Head size 3 pallets (TK76) are pretty big, old Volkl pallets size 4 (Powerbridge) were actually huge. Compared to those big size ones Angell B grip is bit smaller.
My Angell B3 grip was smaller then the yonex duel g, bab PS, V-sense 10mid and PK Q+5pro. I tried these frames while having my angells so was able to compare the grip size and Angells always felt smaller. I used to also feel some twist so instinct was to have tighter grip when hitting. I changed the pallets to b4 and no more tight grip and feels fine size wise. I swear I have normal hands :D
 

FranzS

Rookie
We had the chance to play with multiple Angell frames last night and we had amazing fun doing so. For reference, I am a 3.5 level player and my partner is a mid-level 4.0. On hand we had Wilson PS85, TC90, TC95, TC97-I and TC97-II. Here are the strung specs for each:
  • P85, we did not measure, stock frame with multifilament strings at unknown tension
  • TC90: 16x18, 339 gm, 318 mm balance, 27.25” length, full bed Halo at 58#
  • TC95: 18x20, 333 gm, 330 mm, 27.5”, full bed Halo at 56#
  • TC97-I: 16x19, 346 gm, 324 mm, 27.5”, Klip Legend 16 @ 56# and Halo @ 56#
  • TC97-II: 18x20, 335 gm, 326 mm, 27”, Klip Legend 16 @ 56# and Halo @ 56#
Couple of notes up front: (1) I have to retract all my first-impression comments on the TC97 18x20 that were negative. I had a blast playing with it this time around, just a superb frame all around. (2) At the end of 70 mins of playing we concluded that all Angell frames played really well, we could pick anyone of them up and not feel any remorse, and (3) the PS85 felt heavier than the TC90 and less maneuverable.

Ground strokes:

The TC90 requires good footwork and timing to get the most out of it. If those two are there, it is a very rewarding frame. The 2nd most unforgiving frame of the bunch (first place goes to the PS85), but when you get the shot right, the pace, precision and spin are pretty much unmatched as a combination. Each of the frames do one, two or even three things great, but the TC90 does more so in all aspects, particularly ground strokes, volleys and slices. Its power could only be matched by the TC97s in our hands, I suspect that the 70 RA rating had something to do with it. At the same time, it was the most muted and as plush as any of the other racquets. It also was closest to the PS85 in feel and certainly the word “classic” came to mind frequently.

The TC97-I produced superb pace, but comparatively was the least accurate frame of the bunch. You’d only notice this when you play these frames back to back, because I always thought it is quite accurate and precise, but next to TC90 or TC97-II, it lacked ease of ball placement. As expected though, besides its power, it also had ton of spin on ground strokes, more so than any other, but not by a wide margin. One thing that worked better for the TC97-I was ball pocketing seemed better and it produced a feel that was crisper with touch shots at the volley IMHO, but that did not translate into more precision compared to the TC90 or 97-II. If you were just playing with the 97-I, you’d think it has great feel, which it certainly does, and consequently offers better placement, which it does not.

TC97-II was the most surprising to us. I really had difficulty generating any amount of spin with it the first time I played with it, but this time, it was very close to the 97-I which has an open string pattern. It also nearly matched 97-I’s power, but it absolutely surpassed it in ball placement and generating underspin, sidespin and long razor sharp slices. It is also quite forgiving as its sweetspot is pretty large, particularly compared to the TC90. Unfortunately, the part that is not as good as the TC90 is its balance, it just cannot match it, and the TC90 feels very light on its feet, whippy!

TC95 felt lacking in all the attributes of the others just slightly. It felt like a frame that does it all, but no master of any. It was a little more precise than the 97-I, similar spin to 97-II, but lacked the capability of under spin of the 97-II or the power of the 97-I. The TC90 had more feel and inspired the most confidence, at the same time when I got tired towards the end, my timing was slightly off and made more errors with the TC90, still a highly desirable frame IMO.

Ratings: TC90: 9.5, TC95: 7.5, TC97-I: 8, TC97-II: 9.5

Volleys:

This was very easy to conclude: The TC90 and PS85 outgun everything else. The maneuverability and precision is just not found with the other frames, although TC97-II comes closest. The only thing that holds the TC97-II back, is its balance being more head heavy, or I should say, less HL. The TC90 is so easy to get in front of the ball and its sweetspot being smaller is not a disadvantage in this case at all.

The TC95 came close in the volleys to the TC97-II, but we just could not find a reason to prefer the TC95 over the 97-II as the later is slightly more forgiving, and equally or more effective.

The 97-I is just not the best weapon in this company; lacked the precision, feel and crispness of the others. By itself, it performs very well, but in this bunch it lacks behind. We could not tap into its groundstroke power with short volley motion, finishing points with it was tougher.

Ratings: TC90: 10, TC95: 8.5, TC97-I: 6.5, TC97-II: 9

Chip-and-Charge:

This is the domain of the TC90 and TC97-II, they were the clear winners. TC95 was again close, but not quite at the same level. With the TC97-I it became apparent that it is mostly detrimental to even try to chip-and-charge once you get used to the ease of doing so with the other racquets. I suspect the open string pattern is to blame for this as it was hard to control and judge where and how to best place the ball to actually create the opportunity to charge. Most of the time, we just put the ball out of bounds or to the net with the TC97-I.

Ratings: TC90: 9.5, TC95: 9, TC97-I: 5, TC97-II: 10

Serves:

This was a tough call in every regard. We tried so many different types of serves and each racquet gave us varying amount of success, and mostly we had to adjust few things to get the most out of each to our liking. Overall though my partner had great pace and placement with the TC97-II, and I did so with the TC97-I as I have been using that frame for more than a year now. The kick serves just jump over 6’ with the TC97-II, and spin serves have beautiful curves with the 97-I, and TC95 gave us a little bit of both but not enough to persuade us to use it for serves. We generated weakest serves, but most precise placements with the TC90. Towards the end, we figured out that we had to toss the ball further forward than we already do with other racquets, and jump slightly higher to before hitting, which then generates good pace in addition to spin. However, serving kicks with the TC90 were difficult, we could not be consistent with it. The only knock we have on the TC97-II is that we had the most sensitivity on our shoulders with it than any other frame.

Ratings: TC90: 7.5, TC95: 8.5, TC97-I: 9.5, TC97-II: 9.5

RoS:

This one was easy, very easy in fact. The TC90 and TC97-II were so far above everything else, it is difficult to compare them. Surprisingly the TC95 wasn’t also close this time. With the TC90 and TC97-II you just think of how and where to return the service and they are on remote control almost, it just happens. The only two issues with the TC97-II compared to the TC90 were (1) lack of comparative maneuverability caused few bad hits, and (2) for some reason my CC returns were dropping short, I just could not hit all the way to the back corner, and because of short returns, I got killed on the next shot. DTL returns were no issues at all, in fact they were beyond effective. With TC97-II the best parts were returning flat serves to my BH with hard slices or flat block returns, they were dream-like and extremely effective. TC90 was equally effective, more so on CC returns, but we had to have our timing just right. Its easy maneuverability paid dividends here.

With the TC95, most returns were relatively short and I had to pray not to get creamed next shot. Left a lot to be desired compared to the TC90 and 97-II.

The TC97-I does great topspin returns, better than others I think, but it lacks in every other area; precision, slice returns or block returns.

Ratings: TC90: 9.5, TC95: 7.5, TC97-I: 6.5, TC97-II: 9

It was so much fun to get all these frames together and play, I hope to do it again soon. There is another 4.0 player with a TC100 near by, I hope we can include him or the frame or both next time too :D

Here is a short vid to help with visualization:
Excellent and really interesting review, Ft.S. I've got a question for you and for anyone else who's had some experience with both Angell TC90 and Wilson PS85.
I own a PS85 reissue (the one available on TW 'til some time ago) and I love it. I got used to it and wouldn't go back to 95" (also own a BLX PS95). So, I'm searching for a stick with just a tad more free power and just a bit more forgiving, but with the same overall feel as the PS85. How would you compare TC90 and PS85? I'm a bit concerned about stiffness: PS85 reissue was listed at 66 RA if I'm not mistaken. TC90 is listed at 70 RA (I know the story about its actual stiffness breakdown). How would you describe and compare the feel/perceived stiffness of those two sticks?
 

zalive

Hall of Fame
My Angell B3 grip was smaller then the yonex duel g, bab PS, V-sense 10mid and PK Q+5pro. I tried these frames while having my angells so was able to compare the grip size and Angells always felt smaller. I used to also feel some twist so instinct was to have tighter grip when hitting. I changed the pallets to b4 and no more tight grip and feels fine size wise. I swear I have normal hands :D
I should recheck. I ordered B4, I usually use 4, sometimes even 3 (though increased by scotch tape to at least half a size), and 4 felt normal to me. Possibly it's bit smaller than average 4 but I never noticed. Or it's just comparing it to above average handles. Babolat uses above average handles, and Yonex when you replace grip with something normal is also above average, for what I hear. However Angell I have feels just average to me.

edit: I recently compared at the shop one Wilson (possibly Pro Open? I didn't pay much attention which one it was) and one Babolat (PD? the same), and Bab size 2 was actually feeling almost identically thick as a Wilson size 3. With digression that Babolat felt normal size and Wilson felt ridiculously thin for the given size.
 
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Hotrocks

Rookie
Good day gentleman....Since your all on the subject of grip sizes, is it possible to order new pallets and butt caps from Paul. I am inquiring for a friend which owns a TC100. Thanks...
 

ed70

Professional
With reference to grips Wilson frames are all over the place with their sizing, My UT L3 is smaller than the Angel TC97 L3 ended up putting a head comfort on the UT as it's a thicker grip than the sublime. I actually have found prince to have the smallest L3. I'm very grip sensitive don't like overgrips so I waste a bit of money over the years getting the grip right.
You would of thought with precision engineering racquet brands would get correct grip size widths.
 
Ok, grip question I haven't found a definitive answer for, and by now I have read a great deal of this thread.

Is the C grip shape truly an "even-sided" octagon, or is it just more even than the B? Even the shape of a Prince racquet is not an even octagon, at least the princes I have seen of friends or in store; it still has one dimension slightly longer than the other or than the diagonals.

The order form says "even-sided" and has a small icon of an equal octagon, but the FAQ says it is the shape a Prince, hence the confusion. So if someone who owns a C grip shape could clear that up that would be great!

(For my part I like a fatter handle, I have been adding strips of veneer to the long sides of my dunlops to make them more like Prince. But I don't want a completely even octagon cause I think that would make it harder to feel the different grips.)
 

haqq777

Legend
Ok, grip question I haven't found a definitive answer for, and by now I have read a great deal of this thread.

Is the C grip shape truly an "even-sided" octagon, or is it just more even than the B? Even the shape of a Prince racquet is not an even octagon, at least the princes I have seen of friends or in store; it still has one dimension slightly longer than the other or than the diagonals.

The order form says "even-sided" and has a small icon of an equal octagon, but the FAQ says it is the shape a Prince, hence the confusion. So if someone who owns a C grip shape could clear that up that would be great!

(For my part I like a fatter handle, I have been adding strips of veneer to the long sides of my dunlops to make them more like Prince. But I don't want a completely even octagon cause I think that would make it harder to feel the different grips.)
I'll try to post pictures and hopefully that helps. This is my regular B shape handle in size 3:


This is what the C shape size 3 one looks like on my Angell (just needs Angell Butt cap):


And here is just a sample of what Grip shape C looks like (bottom one). This is from my Prince Classic Response 97. Size 4:


Hope that helps with shapes. I gel with shape B and C. Not so much with A (flat topped) which is more of a traditional HEAD grip shape. I also feel that grip shape C is much closer in shape to B than A.
 
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Ok, thank you, this does help. I see that grip C is not a completely even octagon but is like a Prince shape. (I think that Angell should take the "even-sided" language off the order form and post more accurate icons of the different shapes.)

Either the B or C would probably work for me fine. I'll tell you what i really like, though, is longer diagonal sides that are even with or perhaps more area than the small sides. That is what is produced when you take a standard/B/Dunlop type shape and build up the long sides with veneer strips. That way you get more space to feel the continental, service, and semi western grips, and I think perhaps more leverage on serve.

So my choice is getting the C shape size 4 and getting used to it, or B shape size 3 and building up the long sides like I have on current dunlops. At least now I know it will be fairly close either way.

Sorry to those who feel this discussion is boring or insanely picky, but I know there are some out there who appreciate those subtle differences ;)
 

Ft.S

Semi-Pro
Excellent and really interesting review, Ft.S. I've got a question for you and for anyone else who's had some experience with both Angell TC90 and Wilson PS85.
I own a PS85 reissue (the one available on TW 'til some time ago) and I love it. I got used to it and wouldn't go back to 95" (also own a BLX PS95). So, I'm searching for a stick with just a tad more free power and just a bit more forgiving, but with the same overall feel as the PS85. How would you compare TC90 and PS85? I'm a bit concerned about stiffness: PS85 reissue was listed at 66 RA if I'm not mistaken. TC90 is listed at 70 RA (I know the story about its actual stiffness breakdown). How would you describe and compare the feel/perceived stiffness of those two sticks?
Unfortunately I cannot compare those two, I have not played with the PS85. I really liked the TC90; yes it is a little less unforgiving than other TCs, but the power and accuracy are superb. Where I felt wanting was stability in returning very heavy balls. That is more to do with my less-than-developed technique and footwork, then the racquet. I switched to a different racquet that compensates me in that area more than TC90. I would only guess that TC90 would be more forgiving than PS85.

Additionally, I never felt stiffness was something noticeable compared to other TCs, I don't think 70RA is or would be an issue.
 
J

joohan

Guest
That is more to do with my less-than-developed technique and footwork, then the racquet.
That might not necessarily be true. I did not find TC90 to be particularly stable myself plus we're still talking about a midsize frame. I've just fully committed to TC100 63RA but just after 2 weeks I'm starting to reap the rewards. Huge sweetspot, penetrating power and spin, etc...just different animal compared to either TC90 or TC97 18x20.

If you really need a frame like TC90 for any reason, I'd really doubt either your credentials or decision making process once you start doubting your choice. TC90 is an exceptional frame but you really need to have the game to use it to its full potential. If you can't, you're to blame.

Edit: sorry for being so offensive. After deeper inspection, I mainly wrote the second paragraph to myself.
 
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Jouke

Semi-Pro
So I'm 1 month into my Angell TC100 63RA 300g 330mm purchased from a fellow TT member. I have been using a Prostaff 97 for the last year and a half. I was looking for something with a little less weight, a little more forgiving, and as stable as my PS97.

Rating my main strokes with each racquet:

PS97 1.FH 2. Serve 3. Volleys 4. BH

Angell 1.Volleys 2. BH 3. Serve 4. FH

Volleys: The Angell is much quicker and has a much bigger sweat spot than the PS97 and my volleys have been rewarded. Very stable, great for high volleys, low volleys, touch. I am more aggressive at the net because I have so much confidence in the frame.

BH: My OHBH topspin was decent with my PS97 as was my slice, my OHBH with my Angell is sweet, topspin, flat, slice. It might be time to run around my FH, lol. I have confidence to hit away.

Serve: I have much better pace with the Angell but thus far not as much control. I am hitting harder and deeper but my opponents are having an easier time returning my serve and I'm not getting as much directional control. There are times where I think its gonna click, but not often enough. I know I can get there. It boils down to I hold my serve more often with the PS97 (rarely broken) then the Angell (broken often). I don't have a big serve, I rely on placement and variety.

Forehand: this is my biggest issue. I am really struggling with the FH with the Angell. With the PS97, I'm fully dialed in. I'm not consistent with the Angell and am struggling keeping the ball in the court. Because I'm struggling to keep the ball in the court, I'm losing confidence in the shot.

String Setups: 1st- RS Lyon 49lbs. I used this for about 12 hours, good control, good comfort. It was really fantastic off the stringer. 2nd-my usual setup in my PS97 Lux Alu Power Soft/Sensation hybrid, 51/53. I really liked it at first but after several plays, it really got powerful. 3rd RS Lyon/Sensation hybrid 50/52. Off the stringing machine felt a little dead, 2nd try out on the court, felt pretty good. Probably my favorite setup yet.

I've done some tinkering with lead tape and and am now hoping I've found the right static weight for me. I have a small amt of lead tape at 12 and put a nickel under my butt cap and its coming in at 327grams. A little lighter than my PS97. I took a ball machine out for lunch today and that spec seemed to help my FH. I hit my FH for about 45 minutes and my serve for about 15. I hoping that repetition would turn things around on my FH and serve. If I can correct these shots, I will be one happy camper.
Really nice read! And comparable to my experiences. Can you explain to me, after coming from the PS97 why you chose the TC100 and not the TC97 18x20? I really liked the TC100, turned my Backhand into the best Backhand I have ever hit! But I just could not get the forehand dialed in.. I can foresee you leaving this frame. Not getting the forehand dialed in and struggling on your own serve just makes it sooo much harder to win.

if someone's used to blades then B would be his best choice?
Without a doubt!

On the Angell sizing: yes they are smaller. But not a full size, more like 3/4 size in my experience.
 

haqq777

Legend
if someone's used to blades then B would be his best choice?
Without a doubt!

On the Angell sizing: yes they are smaller. But not a full size, more like 3/4 size in my experience.
Yes, as @Jouke pointed out. Also, in my experience the 98 Blade CV grip size runs smaller than previous iterations of Blades. Almost everyone who hit with the CV version has said that to me too. Just something to keep in mind :)
 

galapagos

Professional
Yes, as @Jouke pointed out. Also, in my experience the 98 Blade CV grip size runs smaller than previous iterations of Blades. Almost everyone who hit with the CV version has said that to me too. Just something to keep in mind :)
Was asking more about the shape. Not sizing. Also imo A angell is even more pronounced than nowadays head
 

haqq777

Legend
Was asking more about the shape. Not sizing. Also imo A angell is even more pronounced than nowadays head
Ok. Angell Shape B then since Blades have traditional Wilson handles which correspond to Angell's shape B. One of my hitting partners has added that Wilson X2 Ergo Grip Booster on his handle as well for two handed backhand. Its still same as Shape B Angell.
 
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Kozzy

Semi-Pro
I did not find TC90 to be particularly stable myself plus we're still talking about a midsize frame.
- I haven't found any issue with stability with the TC90. I originally got the 330g/305 balance. It felt quite stable then, but have since taken some of the weight out of the handle (one set of weights). I also added about 4 grams total to the hoop (2g at 3 and 2g at 9). That makes the balance about 4pts HL, and I'm not sure what the weight is at this moment, but it's not far from 330g (maybe a bit above). In the current setup, it's even more rock solid. If you do like a true mid-sized racquet, the TC90 rocks.
 

ace18

Professional
Really nice read! And comparable to my experiences. Can you explain to me, after coming from the PS97 why you chose the TC100 and not the TC97 18x20? I really liked the TC100, turned my Backhand into the best Backhand I have ever hit! But I just could not get the forehand dialed in.. I can foresee you leaving this frame. Not getting the forehand dialed in and struggling on your own serve just makes it sooo much harder to win.

Hey Jouke, i decided to go for the TC100 for really 2 reasons. I'd never tried an Angell and it was a great price, secondly, as I approach 53, I was looking for something that might be a little more user friendly for me, larger headsize than what I'm used to. I've certainly thought of the TC97 and would consider picking one up with the right specs.

So, I played a match yesterday and it was a pretty solid performance all around, FH and Serve included. I moved the lead from 12 to 3/9 and feel that it made a difference. I still didn't have 100% confidence in cracking FH's, but, I was keeping them in play with great depth and very good consistency. I started off serving deep/out but dialed in with more spin and my serve was very effective, My partner and I won 7-6, 7-5 and I wasn't broken. I serve and volleyed 60% of the time and the volleys were just fantastic. I played with the Prince Ozone Tour on and off years ago and that was a great serve and volley stick. This one ranks right there if not better. Volleys just jump off the racquet for me.

The last 2 years I've had lots of shoulder and lower back issues. I wanted to try frames that didn't require so much work on my end that would also be stable and flexible. I wasn't really looking to change racquets, but the deal I found was worth me trying out the Angell TC100.[/QUOTE]
 

stephenclown

Professional


Just arrived! first string choice vs team / alu rough at 48 / 44 or so. Will know how it plays tomorrow :)

Grip 3 feels correct to size compared to my other racquets. Perhaps a slight bit smaller but negligible. Next time I might get size 2 pallets but this is good for my wrist so I cant complain! Leather grip feels great as well.
 
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Hey Jouke, i decided to go for the TC100 for really 2 reasons. I'd never tried an Angell and it was a great price, secondly, as I approach 53, I was looking for something that might be a little more user friendly for me, larger headsize than what I'm used to. I've certainly thought of the TC97 and would consider picking one up with the right specs.

So, I played a match yesterday and it was a pretty solid performance all around, FH and Serve included. I moved the lead from 12 to 3/9 and feel that it made a difference. I still didn't have 100% confidence in cracking FH's, but, I was keeping them in play with great depth and very good consistency. I started off serving deep/out but dialed in with more spin and my serve was very effective, My partner and I won 7-6, 7-5 and I wasn't broken. I serve and volleyed 60% of the time and the volleys were just fantastic. I played with the Prince Ozone Tour on and off years ago and that was a great serve and volley stick. This one ranks right there if not better. Volleys just jump off the racquet for me.

The last 2 years I've had lots of shoulder and lower back issues. I wanted to try frames that didn't require so much work on my end that would also be stable and flexible. I wasn't really looking to change racquets, but the deal I found was worth me trying out the Angell TC100.
tc100 is just such an all round great performer ... that serve power and yet touch is great for so many players... a heavy ball is just such an important intangible but that is what it produces
 
I do the same with my TC 97 A handle. I flared the buttcap about 1/2 cm larger radius with slightly over 2 cm length with I believe leather, and many wraps of overgrip. Feels amazingly secure and stable. Looks ridiculous, but the feel really is pretty great. I find myself reaching for that Angell the most. I know I like it, but want to experiment on different flare sizes to see what fits. How much do you flare yours?
not as dramatic as gasquet... about as much as Stan

is by actually use my pinky particular on back hands and on a lot of serves I use it to create more racquet head speed. I am a violinist as well so I have a very developed pinky muscle from my bowing hand so the flare gives me more leverage.
 
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stephenclown

Professional
Hmm i have a chance to grab a 70 ra tc95 for 30% off new price specs i would want and same grip. Only difference is the ra, does it play much different and noticeable when swapping between the two stiffness ratings?
 

CosmosMpower

Hall of Fame
Hmm i have a chance to grab a 70 ra tc95 for 30% off new price specs i would want and same grip. Only difference is the ra, does it play much different and noticeable when swapping between the two stiffness ratings?
To me not so much in stiffness but maneuverability. I have both 70 and 63RA, I prefer the 70RA. I would go for it.
 

Brand77

Rookie
After some more playtime I am getting more in tune with the Tc100. Had a severe jaw inflammation last week with truckloads of painkillers and little food so my muscles are like jelly but still had a good training session today.
The racquet just oozes with confidence and really rewards a nice smooth stroke. I did add 10 grams under the buttcap to make it more HL which I like for netplay. On off centre hits it feels a bit less comfortable than my old racquet but that might have to do with the highly reduced thickness of the grip and decrease in weight.
All in all, very happy with the purchase. The solid feel when you get a perfect hit is very addictive :)
 

stephenclown

Professional
So first try with the 63RA 16x19 TC95 last night. First thing out of the way, this is unlike any frame I have played before, it is also light for me at 310g unstrung and 300 sw without strings.

Wearing a wrist brace severely limited my forehand and serve as I usually use wrist to impart spin/speed through the stroke like normal. Have not found the groove yet, due to ongoing injury and imminent surgery, going to shape my forehand after federer/del potro more into the future which should be interesting. Previously more like nadal? Difficult to say, heavy topspin to control but lower pace, grew up on clay courts so it became a natural stroke without even knowing of Nadal as a kid. 1 hand backhand inconsistent, mainly used for slice and re-positioning. Due to this injury I have taken so many breaks and have really declined in recent years with fitness and form, still only 27 so there is time to fix that!

I strung with VS Team Gut mains alu rough cross - 50/47. Grip size B3 was perfect, bevels enabled easy switching of grips, the black leather grip is really high quality, not slick at all and my stringer was surprised with how it actually felt.

So onto the actual playing:

Power - just wow, with the gut mains this has insane generation off backhand and forehand. I may need to up this to 53/49 or so for the next stringing. I have a similar setup in my RF97 and this setup I feel can put more pace on the backhand side, but flat shots with RF97 still king for the moment. Will need to weight up the Angell when my wrist is feeling better. I feel like it could easily be better than the RF97 for flat hitting due to such a great base for easy customisation. With the talk about low RA frames sucking power I couldn't agree less with this frame, it was a breeze to generate pace from all areas of the court.

Comfort - Ample comfort, really a fantastic frame to play with for my injured wrist. First time in a long time where a frame hasn't caused supreme discomfort and a lot of pain the next day. Still, my wrist is weak and gripping the handle is not like normal and still was really holding back on the forehand. Felt connected to the ball and was consistent feeling.

Backhands - This is where the frame shone for me last night. Easily the best backhands I have ever hit and for the first time had a compliment on the beauty of the stroke and consistency. Only issue was that the brace kept my wrist locked in so tight that top spin wasn't as easily imparted onto the ball so hit the net tape a lot or just over and fast. Great depth and placement around the court.

Slice - another highlight, this put some serious bite onto the ball, dropped heavily and stayed low all throughout the stroke on forehand and backhand. Some frames have caused issues, especially the pure aero, with floating the slice but this was consistent.

Topspin - Cannot comment at the moment, could not use any wrist lag for fear of immense pain. Even without using lag there is still discomfort and didn't play even close to full level on forehand and serve as well. Still topspin was available.

Manoeuvrability - great here, no complaints, thin beam and stable. Returns are fantastic because of this, whether slice or topspin (limited) off both sides. Need to weight it up a bit, probably need around 345-350 swing weight and should still be fine to move it around.

Overall - just started playing with it but it is a unique experience, solid for this swingweight and so soft but crisp when needed. It is going to be my go to frame. I am so happy with the purchase that when my other racquets sell I am going to buy 1 or 2 more from Paul. TC97 18x20 and either a 90 or 100 and then a second of whichever I love the most. Picking something and sticking to it and understanding it inside and out is how to get better and this racquet makes me finally want to do this, can't see myself looking elsewhere. Prior to trying it I was going to buy a DR98 but I feel it would be a waste as this frame size and plow makes backhands incredibly enjoyable and a beautiful stroke.
 
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stephenclown

Professional
I am so keen to try more to choose the best for me. I am loving the small head and its ease for slice and flat/top backhands.

I am locked into buying a TC97 18x20 at the moment, but would anyone suggest TC90 or TC100 to compliment? Perhaps I just get the TC97 at the moment...

I feel like the Pure Aero was terrible for 1hbh, sluggish etc and worried similar with other 100" frames being a similar story. I would prefer to work on technique, footwork and strength than just relying on frames to generate power if this helps.
 

Kozzy

Semi-Pro
I have no idea ;). I have not played with those (went straight for the TC90 and haven't looked back, yet). To me it feels like a slightly more powerful PS90 - probably about the same power as the VCore Tour F 93 I played with for a bit (but way more comfortable). It's very crisp (not harsh but not soft either) - and feels great. I've never hit a harder serve than I do with it, and my groundstrokes are ripping too (relatively speaking - let's not get ahead of ourselves...). Anyway, I wouldn't say you get a lot of free power, but it doesn't take anything away either. It'll give you what you put into it, plus perhaps just a bit extra.
 

stephenclown

Professional
I have no idea ;). I have not played with those (went straight for the TC90 and haven't looked back, yet). To me it feels like a slightly more powerful PS90 - probably about the same power as the VCore Tour F 93 I played with for a bit (but way more comfortable). It's very crisp (not harsh but not soft either) - and feels great. I've never hit a harder serve than I do with it, and my groundstrokes are ripping too (relatively speaking - let's not get ahead of ourselves...). Anyway, I wouldn't say you get a lot of free power, but it doesn't take anything away either. It'll give you what you put into it, plus perhaps just a bit extra.
Maybe it will be too much, I guess it would be difficult to go backwards down from 95 all the time but possibly better for drills to ensure I have a more consistent stroke... Wonder if it is worth practicing with it and for fun.

My girlfriend might kill me if I bought 2, but I may be able to get away with 1 :)
 

haqq777

Legend
Just tell her that there was a promo buy one and get one for free! :D Or even better, buy two and get one for free!
+1. Hey my wife gives me that BOGO line of reasoning all the time for her shoes. Only logical she accepts it too. If only spouses were logical beings though, right! ;)
 

Subaruvich

Semi-Pro
I love the TC90, but then, I'm most comfortable with a mid. Really fun to play with if you like that kind of thing.
What is your preferred string and tension for TC90? I find myself derailed lately experimenting with strings in my TC90. Need to get back on track asap :)
 
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