The "Ratchet" Racket

max

Legend
I've casually read this section and I always grimace when Gamma/ATS folks go on about how vastly superior the ratchet is on their dropweight stringers, compared to Klippermate. Most of these people have never worked with a Klippermate and it doesn't register that a Klippermate user gets acquainted with how much string to put in the Klippermate stringjaw. They also forget to mention how difficult it is to open and close Gamma/ATS clamps. . . how much sheer time is lost wrestling these clamps! Or that in the corners, these clamps don't get as close to the racquet frame as the Klippermate clamps. So I see this "ratchet racket" as a big rhetorical point, one which needs scrutiny. I suspect it takes about the same time to string a frame on a Klippermate and a Gamma/ATS dropweight. But it would be nice to not have to hear this big "ratchet" point brought up as if that's the dealkiller.
 

nViATi

Hall of Fame
max said:
I've casually read this section and I always grimace when Gamma/ATS folks go on about how vastly superior the ratchet is on their dropweight stringers, compared to Klippermate. Most of these people have never worked with a Klippermate and it doesn't register that a Klippermate user gets acquainted with how much string to put in the Klippermate stringjaw. They also forget to mention how difficult it is to open and close Gamma/ATS clamps. . . how much sheer time is lost wrestling these clamps! Or that in the corners, these clamps don't get as close to the racquet frame as the Klippermate clamps. So I see this "ratchet racket" as a big rhetorical point, one which needs scrutiny. I suspect it takes about the same time to string a frame on a Klippermate and a Gamma/ATS dropweight. But it would be nice to not have to hear this big "ratchet" point brought up as if that's the dealkiller.
Or they could get a Silent Partner Swing and have the pros of both the Klippermate(good clamps) and the Gamma/ATS(ratcheting)
 

POGO

Hall of Fame
nViATi said:
Or they could get a Silent Partner Swing and have the pros of both the Klippermate(good clamps) and the Gamma/ATS(ratcheting)
Or, which can be cheaper, buy the Gamma/ATS (ratcheting) stringer and buy two klippermate steal clamps (good clamps).

I use a klippermate and had it for over ten years now. I still use the original clamps. Klippermate is certainly top quality and built to last.
 

max

Legend
Wow! The Silent Partner Swing looks VERY nice! I don't think SP was around when I bought the Klippermate. Looks good.
 

Ben42

Semi-Pro
I had a Klippermate for about 15 years and never developed that "feel" for how much slack to give to only do one pull. Of course I only string about 1 stick a month so I didn't get a lot of practice time.

So I got an ATS SSII. The ratchet really helps for me. But I agree, the clamps are bulky and hard to open and close. So I sold them with my Klippermate (which got me a bit of a bonus) and bought Laserfibre floating clamps, which are really nice floating clamps. It's the perfect setup for me.
 
I always grimmace when I see people using any machine that is a two point mounting system and floating clamps. But dont get me wrong, it still beats the heck out paying someone else to do it.
 

Ben42

Semi-Pro
Why? I've strung now for almost 20 years on a couple of two-point mount stingers with floating clamps. I've never damaged a racquet and I've been happy with the string jobs I've gotten.
 
A machine with two point mounting and floating clamps works and may work well but they are still just the starting point for stringing machines. I just like having everything locked down on a six-point mounting system and the stability of fixed clamps. Its like a Geo Metro may run great for 20 years and get you around town but at the end of the day, its still a Metro. But really I was just kidding around in my post, I think most of the machines out there these days do a fine job.
 

Ben42

Semi-Pro
No prob, Harharwood. I agree mostly. I guess I see myself as someone who only drives about a mile back and forth to work. I'd love Acura, but I don't need more than a Metro.
 

ohplease

Professional
Ben42 said:
I had a Klippermate for about 15 years and never developed that "feel" for how much slack to give to only do one pull. Of course I only string about 1 stick a month so I didn't get a lot of practice time.

So I got an ATS SSII. The ratchet really helps for me. But I agree, the clamps are bulky and hard to open and close. So I sold them with my Klippermate (which got me a bit of a bonus) and bought Laserfibre floating clamps, which are really nice floating clamps. It's the perfect setup for me.

Here's someone else who's owned both the klippermate and the SSII. The SSII ratchet is clearly better. And yes I got acquainted with how much slack I should leave on each pull.

As for the clamps - true, but there are cheap, decent floating clamps out there.
 

barry

Hall of Fame
ohplease said:
Here's someone else who's owned both the klippermate and the SSII. The SSII ratchet is clearly better. And yes I got acquainted with how much slack I should leave on each pull.

As for the clamps - true, but there are cheap, decent floating clamps out there.

Never owned or worked with a rotational ratchet stringer, but does the ratchet work like the laserfibre machines, where you pump it. Or more like a linear string gripper with a ratchet, where you simply tighten the string before dropping the weight?
 

yourserve

Rookie
barry, not sure if i can answer your question with words. but the
klipper has a ratchet that grips the string and turns as the weight
tensions the string. you have to set the proper amount of slack
between the racquet and the string gripper on the tension arm.
this slack is a different length depending on tension, and esp. the
type of string. i hated to do kevlar with the klipper because of this.

ps how yall like technical speech? "string gripper"
lol
 

POGO

Hall of Fame
yourserve said:
barry, not sure if i can answer your question with words. but the
klipper has a ratchet that grips the string and turns as the weight
tensions the string. you have to set the proper amount of slack
between the racquet and the string gripper on the tension arm.
this slack is a different length depending on tension, and esp. the
type of string. i hated to do kevlar with the klipper because of this.

ps how yall like technical speech? "string gripper"
lol
Really?????? The Klippermate has a ratcheting grip? Must new on the newer klippermate since my 10 year old klippermate does not have a ratchet grip. The string gripper on my klippermat are two steal assemblys that clamps the string when the dropweight arm goes clockwise or towards horizontal.

You get better with the Klippermate by getting the feel of how much slack is needed to tension the string.
 

yourserve

Rookie
d'oh... and i tryed so hard not to use the word "ratchet"
didn't wish to imply that the klipper has a ratchet... sorry.
 

ohplease

Professional
barry said:
Never owned or worked with a rotational ratchet stringer, but does the ratchet work like the laserfibre machines, where you pump it. Or more like a linear string gripper with a ratchet, where you simply tighten the string before dropping the weight?

Never used either. It works because you leave too much slack and lift/ratchet the arm level. With the klippermate? you reposition the string in the jaws. Which isn't that bad if you're using basic synthetic, but kevlar? Natural gut? Stretchy multis?
 

barry

Hall of Fame
ohplease said:
Never used either. It works because you leave too much slack and lift/ratchet the arm level. With the klippermate? you reposition the string in the jaws. Which isn't that bad if you're using basic synthetic, but kevlar? Natural gut? Stretchy multis?

I have an old linear ratchet gripper which works like this:

http://www.eagnas.com/maxgen/griprach.html

Was wondering if the rotational gripper works the same as the one I have; or if it works like an LF machine and you pump the handle.
 

bridge

New User
hi barry, your present stringer incorporates a rotational ratchet combined with a linearly activated string gripper. The x2 and ss2 incorporate a rotational ratchet combined with a rotationally engaged string gripper. Ratchetting and gripping are separate mechanical activities that take place simultaneously with clockwise rotation of the drop weight bar. The x2 manual reveals the ratchet gear teeth are placed on the diameter; I'm thinking your machine's gear teeth may be placed on a hub face in a fan pattern. Is this the way it is? On another note, there is something I need your help with; a few days back I posted my first post on this forum and it flopped miserably. It was about the eagnas clampdowns and arms that are on your machine. I even primed it with your name! I value your opinions and would appreciate any feedback - how you liked them,function,how they held up,etc. Its sort of pivotal in deciding between the machines mentioned or moving on to other possibilities. Perhaps you could post on that thread and help me save face!;) Thanks
 

barry

Hall of Fame
bridge said:
hi barry, your present stringer incorporates a rotational ratchet combined with a linearly activated string gripper. The x2 and ss2 incorporate a rotational ratchet combined with a rotationally engaged string gripper. Ratchetting and gripping are separate mechanical activities that take place simultaneously with clockwise rotation of the drop weight bar. The x2 manual reveals the ratchet gear teeth are placed on the diameter; I'm thinking your machine's gear teeth may be placed on a hub face in a fan pattern. Is this the way it is? On another note, there is something I need your help with; a few days back I posted my first post on this forum and it flopped miserably. It was about the eagnas clampdowns and arms that are on your machine. I even primed it with your name! I value your opinions and would appreciate any feedback - how you liked them,function,how they held up,etc. Its sort of pivotal in deciding between the machines mentioned or moving on to other possibilities. Perhaps you could post on that thread and help me save face!;) Thanks

In the tension head, there is a coiled spring which allows the rotation of the linear gripper (One way, clockwise). My machine has the 6 point mounting system with posts to hold the center top and bottom of the racket. It also has knobs which screw down to hold the frame. It works very well; I have never had any problems mounting frames, or any movement when stringing. It has the single knob to adjust the side posts. I like the single knob better than the newer machines which adjust individually from either side. My machine is up to about 475 rackets; it broke once, and cost $14 to fix. Parts were shipped and received within 3 days. The machine is almost 6 years old now.
I do like the newer mounts and pads on the center posts. If it were me, I would select a machine without the screw on knobs (http://www.eagnas.com/maxgen/fl940ms.html) , and definitely get a 6 points mounting system. Will check back on your other posts, but overall I have had zero problems with my machine, and we use it a lot.

Thanks for clearing up the rotational gripper question.
 
Top