The thinner the gauge the lower the tension??

#1
If I string the same type of string with different gauges is it better to sting the thinner gauge with a lower tension.

For example HyperG 16L @ 22kg , then the HyperG 18 @ 20 kg???

What are your thoughts about it. Im looking for forward to all the reactions
 
#2
It's hard to say because the 18g may start out tighter for a given tension, but then break in faster. Or for another model string, it may break in at the same rate as the thicker gauge and need a lower tension. Break in being equal, I would try them both at the same tension until you know what you've got.
 
#4
I used to buy 17g rpm blast for my crosses and string at 58 lbs- bought a reel of 18g and did the same, loved the way it played but the 18g sawed through the gut to quick for my liking. I’m not a fan of stringing racquets. I now string at about 50lbs and it seems to last longer .
Could be other variables involved but I hardly ever string 18 above 50 anymore. Seems to increase durability.
 

Traffic

Hall of Fame
#5
If I string the same type of string with different gauges is it better to sting the thinner gauge with a lower tension.

For example HyperG 16L @ 22kg , then the HyperG 18 @ 20 kg???

What are your thoughts about it. Im looking for forward to all the reactions
I would string same tension initially. Then feel the difference of the two gauges. Change one variable at a time.
 
#6
This was a tip from the seller of a tennisbrand.
But if I see the tests of TWU then is de thinner gauge softer then the thicker one.
I'd say that the general expectation is for the thicker gauge to play more firm than a thinner version of that string installed at the same tension in the same racquet. As our pal Traffic offered above, it's not unreasonable to suggest changing only one thing at a time (string gauge, tension, type, etc.). But switching to the next thinner gauge of the same string in the same racquet often includes raising tension by one or two lbs. just to yield a similar string bed firmness when the string bed is fresh.

I typically string my own racquets with syn. gut and I prefer the feel of thinner 17 ga. options. If for some reason I swap in a 16 ga. syn. gut, I'll usually drop tension by a pound or two, just because the thicker alternative can feel more firm and "clunky", giving me less feedback. During hotter conditions in the middle of the summer, the extra inherent firmness of 16 ga. syn. gut can help me because it doesn't soften up as dramatically in the heat compared with thinner strings. If I use moderate tension with the heavier gauge, I can get pretty good feel in a string bed that doesn't get too flimsy if temps spike by maybe 12F-15F.

Short story long... I'd say that if you want to get a similar firmness when switching from 16L to 18 ga. HyperG, try installing the 18 ga. at perhaps two lbs. (or 1 kg) higher tension and go from there. But if you're switching gauges to get an inherently softer layout with that same string, try the lighter gauge at the same tension. Either way, you'll get some sort of reference to work with using that lighter gauge of string. That trial and error can take a little patience, but it's often necessary to nail down that particular feel and performance we prefer in our gear.
 
#7
I'd say that the general expectation is for the thicker gauge to play more firm than a thinner version of that string installed at the same tension in the same racquet. As our pal Traffic offered above, it's not unreasonable to suggest changing only one thing at a time (string gauge, tension, type, etc.). But switching to the next thinner gauge of the same string in the same racquet often includes raising tension by one or two lbs. just to yield a similar string bed firmness when the string bed is fresh.

I typically string my own racquets with syn. gut and I prefer the feel of thinner 17 ga. options. If for some reason I swap in a 16 ga. syn. gut, I'll usually drop tension by a pound or two, just because the thicker alternative can feel more firm and "clunky", giving me less feedback. During hotter conditions in the middle of the summer, the extra inherent firmness of 16 ga. syn. gut can help me because it doesn't soften up as dramatically in the heat compared with thinner strings. If I use moderate tension with the heavier gauge, I can get pretty good feel in a string bed that doesn't get too flimsy if temps spike by maybe 12F-15F.

Short story long... I'd say that if you want to get a similar firmness when switching from 16L to 18 ga. HyperG, try installing the 18 ga. at perhaps two lbs. (or 1 kg) higher tension and go from there. But if you're switching gauges to get an inherently softer layout with that same string, try the lighter gauge at the same tension. Either way, you'll get some sort of reference to work with using that lighter gauge of string. That trial and error can take a little patience, but it's often necessary to nail down that particular feel and performance we prefer in our gear.
I told the salesman that I string my Babolat Pure Drive 2015 with HyperG18 @ 24 kg... I told him that I gonna test now the HyperG16L @ 22 kg. At that moment he said to string the thinner gauge always lower then the thicker one.

I think you are right that is gonna be a trial and error to find the best setup.
 

Traffic

Hall of Fame
#8
I told the salesman that I string my Babolat Pure Drive 2015 with HyperG18 @ 24 kg... I told him that I gonna test now the HyperG16L @ 22 kg. At that moment he said to string the thinner gauge always lower then the thicker one.

I think you are right that is gonna be a trial and error to find the best setup.
Regardless of which gauge you go with, I'd string 22kg.
 
#9
I told the salesman that I string my Babolat Pure Drive 2015 with HyperG18 @ 24 kg... I told him that I gonna test now the HyperG16L @ 22 kg. At that moment he said to string the thinner gauge always lower then the thicker one.

I think you are right that is gonna be a trial and error to find the best setup.
Let us know how it turns out.
 

KaiserW

Hall of Fame
#11
I would say the opposite. I think thinner gauge should be strung higher than thicker gauge to get the same level of control.

The thinner string should be more lively that is my reasoning. But yes you will have to experiment.
 
#12
It's clear, then, that the flatter the string bed remains during a shot, the better the ball control will be (at the expense of power). How do you maintain a flat string bed? By using less-stretchy string.

Thin strings are more elastic than thick ones, and loose strings are more elastic than tight ones. So what's to choose? Can you take a thick string and simply string it loosely to duplicate the power and control of a thin one?

Sorry, but it doesn't work that way. At equal stringing tensions, thin string is stretched further than thick string, so thin string behaves stiffer than thick string, and this seems to give thin string an edge on control, just as it has an edge on power. Additionally, thin string penetrates the surface of the ball deeper than thick string, and this provides more "bite" for spin shots.

First find the playability characteristics that are most important to you, then select string gauge and tension accordingly.

Here are two final considerations. Thick strings hold tension better: at the same pound-tension, they won't go "dead" as quickly as thin ones. And more elastic strings transmit less shock to the player's arm, so they may be better if you're worried about "tennis elbow."

Once you've found the tension at which your racquet generates maximum power for a particular string, you may want to tune the racquet further to suit your style of play. By reducing the tension a few pounds, the string will be less prone to breakage. By raising the tension a couple pounds, you'll stiffen the string bed: it will remain flatter when you hit the ball, and you'll gain control.


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#13
It's clear, then, that the flatter the string bed remains during a shot, the better the ball control will be (at the expense of power). How do you maintain a flat string bed? By using less-stretchy string.

Thin strings are more elastic than thick ones, and loose strings are more elastic than tight ones. So what's to choose? Can you take a thick string and simply string it loosely to duplicate the power and control of a thin one?

Sorry, but it doesn't work that way. At equal stringing tensions, thin string is stretched further than thick string, so thin string behaves stiffer than thick string, and this seems to give thin string an edge on control, just as it has an edge on power. Additionally, thin string penetrates the surface of the ball deeper than thick string, and this provides more "bite" for spin shots.

First find the playability characteristics that are most important to you, then select string gauge and tension accordingly.

Here are two final considerations. Thick strings hold tension better: at the same pound-tension, they won't go "dead" as quickly as thin ones. And more elastic strings transmit less shock to the player's arm, so they may be better if you're worried about "tennis elbow."

Once you've found the tension at which your racquet generates maximum power for a particular string, you may want to tune the racquet further to suit your style of play. By reducing the tension a few pounds, the string will be less prone to breakage. By raising the tension a couple pounds, you'll stiffen the string bed: it will remain flatter when you hit the ball, and you'll gain control.


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I am glad someone has posted this thorough explanation, I felt the same when using luxilon, it wasnt that uncomfortable initially even though it is thicker than other gauges I have used. It takes the shock of the ball and still has plenty of give and stretch.

Thin strings under force from a tennis ball exceed their ability to stretch and can feel more boardy at higher tensions compared to thicker strings. So be wary those who just add a few lbs on a thinner string for arm health. I think I will be sticking with 16 or 17 from now on, hopefully 1.25+

Worth noting that lower power can be more controlled too, more ability to hit out through the ball without half of them sailing long.
 
#14
Also think about playability with thinner gauges . That’s what I did I tried 17g saw that I gained more playability then went to 17L and then 18 or 18L (1.15) , and I gained playability. However I did choose a 16 mains multi and 18L poly cross hybrid .


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