The Useful/Useless Info Thread

Bartelby

Bionic Poster
The BBC propaganda output on Russian affairs is just as informative as their commentary on the great job America is doing re-building democracy in Afghanistan.

Here's a suggestion should you and Vladimir want to watch a Seventies movie together while sharing popcorn:

Was the Soviet James Bond Vladimir Putin's role model?
Published10 May 2017

While generations of Westerners were growing up on the films of James Bond, Soviet citizens had their own favourite spy, a wartime agent who went under the name of Max Otto von Stierlitz. And it could easily have been Stierlitz who prompted Vladimir Putin to join the KGB, writes Dina Newman.

The USSR's answer to James Bond was a very different kind of spy. He had no time for women or gadgets.
https://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-39862225
 

Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
The BBC propaganda output on Russian affairs is just as informative as their commentary on the great job America is doing re-building democracy in Afghanistan.
There is nothing critical in the article, so it's odd that you find it upsetting. It was a popular film and Putin has mentioned liking the film before, and that he wanted to join the KGB since he was young. He even reenacted (loosely) a scene from the film in Igor Shadkhan's 1991 documentary made during Putin's St. Petersburg days to promote his political aspirations and come out as a former KGB officer.

When Putin Commissioned "Power," a Film About Himself

Watch Part of a Film Commissioned by Vladimir Putin — About Himself

JANUARY 12, 2015
by
Tim Molloy

In 1992, as Vladimir Putin rose through the ranks of St. Petersburg’s government, he commissioned a film about himself called Vlast, a Russian word meaning “power.” He used the film to reveal a secret about his past, and to make a promise he didn’t keep.

“Putin had an agenda,” recalled Igor Shadkhan, who made the film. “He wanted to admit that he had been a KGB agent in foreign reconnaissance.”

For Putin, the move was strategic in that it allowed him to out himself as a former agent of the reviled spy agency — and prevent any future attempts to blackmail him about his past.
https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/...commissioned-by-vladimir-putin-about-himself/


https://www.cia.gov/static/531a4b76272e374c2d504c3f669f534c/Cold-War-Spy-Fiction.pdf

Putin visits his former KGB boss on his 90th birthday
6,456,224 views
May 8, 2017
 

Bartelby

Bionic Poster
Your propaganda is tiresome, not upsetting. I can't change your obsessions; only observe them with mirth.

There is nothing critical in the article, so it's odd that you find it upsetting. It was a popular film and Putin has mentioned liking the film before, and that he wanted to join the KGB since he was young. He even reenacted (loosely) a scene from the film in Igor Shadkhan's 1991 documentary made during Putin's St. Petersburg days to promote his political aspirations and come out as a former KGB officer.

When Putin Commissioned "Power," a Film About Himself

Watch Part of a Film Commissioned by Vladimir Putin — About Himself

JANUARY 12, 2015
by
Tim Molloy

In 1992, as Vladimir Putin rose through the ranks of St. Petersburg’s government, he commissioned a film about himself called Vlast, a Russian word meaning “power.” He used the film to reveal a secret about his past, and to make a promise he didn’t keep.

“Putin had an agenda,” recalled Igor Shadkhan, who made the film. “He wanted to admit that he had been a KGB agent in foreign reconnaissance.”

For Putin, the move was strategic in that it allowed him to out himself as a former agent of the reviled spy agency — and prevent any future attempts to blackmail him about his past.
https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/...commissioned-by-vladimir-putin-about-himself/


https://www.cia.gov/static/531a4b76272e374c2d504c3f669f534c/Cold-War-Spy-Fiction.pdf

Putin visits his former KGB boss on his 90th birthday
6,456,224 views
May 8, 2017
 

stringertom

Bionic Poster
Aging quickly now…it’s been 20 years since Jimmy Eat World became overnight musical wonders with Middle and its video that still rocks:

 
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stringertom

Bionic Poster
Becoming useful: pitching a perfect QB rating for his section of a preseason game must have made Jameis Winston feel a year as a backup had its perks, learning next to a brilliant offensive mind like HC Sean Payton. The results tonight were 9/10, 123 yards and two TDs.
 

stringertom

Bionic Poster
Local water treatment may be suspended to allow diverting use of oxygen to local ER/ICU wards in short supply of the “O” to treat walrusians. Just imagine vacationers being ordered to boil water or curtail showering.
 

stringertom

Bionic Poster
Every 101 years U. of Montana defeats U. of Washington on the football field. Go Griz! They watched out where the Huskies go!
 

Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.


"Love and Deceit" - William Blake

Love to faults is always blind,
Always is to joy inclin'd,
Lawless, winged and unconfin'd,
And breaks all chains from every mind.

Deceit, to secrecy inclin'd,
Moves lawful, courteous and refin'd,
To everything but interest blind,
And forges fetters for the mind.

There souls of men are bought and sold,
And milk-fed infancy, for gold,
And youth to slaughter-houses led,
And beauty, for a bit of bread.
http://www.rossettiarchive.org/docs/2p-1863.delms3.rad.html

 

Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
Why Does Playing Tennis Make So Many Pros Miserable?
Naomi Osaka is taking an indefinite break from tennis as she struggles to find meaning and joy from playing. It’s a sadly familiar script for the sport.


Naomi Osaka lost to Leylah Fernandez in the third round of the U.S. Open. She said she didn’t know when she would play again. Credit...Ed Jones/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images
By Matthew Futterman
Sept. 4, 2021


The moment resonated with nearly every player who has ever picked up a racket, and especially those who have reached the pinnacle of tennis.
A tearful Naomi Osaka sat behind a microphone late on Friday night and spoke of how the sport she has so dominated at times has become a joyless binary journey between relief after victories and sadness following losses. There is no contentment, no happiness.

Then came what may be her last public words for some time.

“I think I’m going to take a break from playing for a while,” she said.

How long is anyone’s guess. But while Osaka’s misery is her own — like the unhappiness of the unhappy families Tolstoy refers to at the start of Anna Karenina — tennis has seen this movie so many times before that an unavoidable question arises: What is it about this sport that makes so many of the best players in the world, a collection of athletes seemingly swaddled in wealth and fame and glory, so intolerably miserable?

“I think with anything you’re passionate about, it’s always a love/hate relationship, because you want that thing so bad all the time, you want to be perfect,” Bianca Andreescu, the Canadian star who won the U.S. Open the first time she played it in 2019 but has battled injuries, inconsistency and the frustrations that come with both ever since, said after her third-round win Saturday. “In my case, it’s tennis.”

Careers cut short because of broken minds rather than aging bodies haunt tennis like ghosts.

Bjorn Borg of Sweden, a superstar of the 1970s and winner of 11 Grand Slam titles, lost his fourth U.S. Open final in 1981. He walked off the court, drove away in his car, and never played another Grand Slam tournament again. He was 25. Steffi Graf, the winner of 22 Grand Slam singles titles, quit at 30, just weeks after a French Open title and a Wimbledon final, saying she had lost her motivation and passion for the game. Andre Agassi and Jennifer Capriati succumbed to drug abuse and, in Capriati’s case, addiction, though they managed to mount comebacks.

More recently, Paula Badosa of Spain has spoken of her battles with depression brought on in part by the frustrations and pressures of the game. Iga Swiatek of Poland, who won the 2020 French Open at 19, spoke after a recent loss of seeing little other than tennis balls when she closed her eyes at night. After losing a hard-fought match at the Olympics she sobbed into a towel as though she had lost a close relative.

Golfers play an individual sport filled with crushing frustrations, but they walk peaceful, beautiful grounds through a morning or afternoon, a caddie by their side lending advice and providing technical and emotional support. When they lose, the golf course gets the best of them.

Tennis players and coaches speak of the singular form of intensity and loneliness that accompanies the game.

From the time they are small children, tennis players run on hard, often hot, and sometimes sweltering courts for hours as a human on the other side of the net tries to pound them into exhaustion and defeat. And they do it alone, prohibited from communicating with anyone during the most important matches.

They cross borders and time zones and oceans often from week to week during a grueling, 11-month season. Sometimes they compete at 11 o’clock in the morning. The next day they might start at 11 at night. Sleeping and eating schedules are discombobulated.

Tennis players talk differently when they talk about losing. The player not holding the trophy at the end of a tournament does not come in second place, and semifinalists do not finish in third or fourth. Pro golfers who finished fourth often say they had a great week. Marathoners and swimmers talk about being on the podium.

As Novak Djokovic, no stranger to tennis misery, said the other night, “We are a particular sport that only has one winner.”

The coronavirus pandemic has only magnified pressures and pitfalls, and added another kind of loneliness. For more than a year, at most tournaments players have had to limit their movements to their hotels, practice courts and competition venues, passing long hours alone in soulless rooms. They are tested for Covid-19 every few days, always one swab away from a 10-day isolation far from home.

Daria Abramowicz, a sports psychologist who travels with Swiatek, said the sport in its modern form is an energy sucking journey of climbing the rankings ladder, defending your position, and cultivating fans, as well as sponsors, who can provide a financial safety net but bring their own demands.


Daria Abramowicz, a sports psychologist, with Iga Swiatek in Australia in February.Credit...Alana Holmberg for The New York Times

“If your tank is empty or almost empty, and if you feel burdened that there are a lot of challenges all around the performance, it is impossible to enjoy the process and enjoy this moment,” Abramowicz said.

For better or worse, Osaka has taken on burdens.

After the murder of George Floyd, she flew to Minneapolis to march with protesters. After the shooting of Jacob Blake, she single-handedly brought her sport to a standstill when she announced she would not play her semifinal match in the Western & Southern Open. She wore a mask with the name of a different victim of police violence onto the court for each of her matches at the U.S. Open last year.

“She allows herself to really feel and experience that sadness,” said Pam Shriver, the former top player and Grand Slam doubles champion.

In May, ahead of the French Open, Osaka tried to overturn years of tennis protocol when she refused to participate in post-match news conferences because she said they put too much stress on players, especially after losses. Her stance led to an ugly confrontation with tournament organizers and her withdrawal from the tournamentafter just one match.

In Japan, where she has become a symbol of a new, multiracial vision of a traditionally homogeneous society, she embraced the honor of lighting the Olympic cauldron and becoming the face of the Games. It was her first competition since the French Open.

She has told the world about her battles with depression the past three years, a move that John McEnroe said took great courage. The seven-time Grand Slam winner, who 40 years later is still shaken by the sudden departure of Borg, his chief rival, said her candor probably helped countless people. McEnroe added that it may also make it harder for Osaka to thrive because of the increased attention it brings.

“She’s the type of player we need around the sport another 10 years, that should win a bunch of more majors hopefully, if she’s in the right head space,” McEnroe said days before the start of the U.S. Open.

After spending roughly two years on the pro tour with Swiatek, Abramowicz has concluded that players can survive careers — inevitably filled with losses and disappointment — only by working every day to build self-worth and self-confidence that is not measured by wins and rankings points but rather relationships. Only then can they find a way to enjoy the process, as enervating as it might be.

“You need to maintain the core values, because without that there is nothing,” Abramowicz said. “There is just burned ground.”
https://www.nytimes.com/2021/09/04/sports/tennis/us-open-naomi-osaka.html
 
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stringertom

Bionic Poster
One game into the NFL season and it’s painfully obvious that poor officiating determines way too many contests.

I have been a fan of the sport for 60 years and it was as heartbreaking as ever to see one of seven blind mice determine a close game like tonight. BTW, this is not from the keyboard of a Dallas fan, the team victimized by a horrendous non-call.
 

Sudacafan

Talk Tennis Guru
Why Does Playing Tennis Make So Many Pros Miserable?
Naomi Osaka is taking an indefinite break from tennis as she struggles to find meaning and joy from playing. It’s a sadly familiar script for the sport.


Naomi Osaka lost to Leylah Fernandez in the third round of the U.S. Open. She said she didn’t know when she would play again. Credit...Ed Jones/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images
By Matthew Futterman
Sept. 4, 2021


The moment resonated with nearly every player who has ever picked up a racket, and especially those who have reached the pinnacle of tennis.
A tearful Naomi Osaka sat behind a microphone late on Friday night and spoke of how the sport she has so dominated at times has become a joyless binary journey between relief after victories and sadness following losses. There is no contentment, no happiness.

Then came what may be her last public words for some time.

“I think I’m going to take a break from playing for a while,” she said.

How long is anyone’s guess. But while Osaka’s misery is her own — like the unhappiness of the unhappy families Tolstoy refers to at the start of Anna Karenina — tennis has seen this movie so many times before that an unavoidable question arises: What is it about this sport that makes so many of the best players in the world, a collection of athletes seemingly swaddled in wealth and fame and glory, so intolerably miserable?

“I think with anything you’re passionate about, it’s always a love/hate relationship, because you want that thing so bad all the time, you want to be perfect,” Bianca Andreescu, the Canadian star who won the U.S. Open the first time she played it in 2019 but has battled injuries, inconsistency and the frustrations that come with both ever since, said after her third-round win Saturday. “In my case, it’s tennis.”

Careers cut short because of broken minds rather than aging bodies haunt tennis like ghosts.

Bjorn Borg of Sweden, a superstar of the 1970s and winner of 11 Grand Slam titles, lost his fourth U.S. Open final in 1981. He walked off the court, drove away in his car, and never played another Grand Slam tournament again. He was 25. Steffi Graf, the winner of 22 Grand Slam singles titles, quit at 30, just weeks after a French Open title and a Wimbledon final, saying she had lost her motivation and passion for the game. Andre Agassi and Jennifer Capriati succumbed to drug abuse and, in Capriati’s case, addiction, though they managed to mount comebacks.

More recently, Paula Badosa of Spain has spoken of her battles with depression brought on in part by the frustrations and pressures of the game. Iga Swiatek of Poland, who won the 2020 French Open at 19, spoke after a recent loss of seeing little other than tennis balls when she closed her eyes at night. After losing a hard-fought match at the Olympics she sobbed into a towel as though she had lost a close relative.

Golfers play an individual sport filled with crushing frustrations, but they walk peaceful, beautiful grounds through a morning or afternoon, a caddie by their side lending advice and providing technical and emotional support. When they lose, the golf course gets the best of them.

Tennis players and coaches speak of the singular form of intensity and loneliness that accompanies the game.

From the time they are small children, tennis players run on hard, often hot, and sometimes sweltering courts for hours as a human on the other side of the net tries to pound them into exhaustion and defeat. And they do it alone, prohibited from communicating with anyone during the most important matches.

They cross borders and time zones and oceans often from week to week during a grueling, 11-month season. Sometimes they compete at 11 o’clock in the morning. The next day they might start at 11 at night. Sleeping and eating schedules are discombobulated.

Tennis players talk differently when they talk about losing. The player not holding the trophy at the end of a tournament does not come in second place, and semifinalists do not finish in third or fourth. Pro golfers who finished fourth often say they had a great week. Marathoners and swimmers talk about being on the podium.

As Novak Djokovic, no stranger to tennis misery, said the other night, “We are a particular sport that only has one winner.”

The coronavirus pandemic has only magnified pressures and pitfalls, and added another kind of loneliness. For more than a year, at most tournaments players have had to limit their movements to their hotels, practice courts and competition venues, passing long hours alone in soulless rooms. They are tested for Covid-19 every few days, always one swab away from a 10-day isolation far from home.

Daria Abramowicz, a sports psychologist who travels with Swiatek, said the sport in its modern form is an energy sucking journey of climbing the rankings ladder, defending your position, and cultivating fans, as well as sponsors, who can provide a financial safety net but bring their own demands.


Daria Abramowicz, a sports psychologist, with Iga Swiatek in Australia in February.Credit...Alana Holmberg for The New York Times

“If your tank is empty or almost empty, and if you feel burdened that there are a lot of challenges all around the performance, it is impossible to enjoy the process and enjoy this moment,” Abramowicz said.

For better or worse, Osaka has taken on burdens.

After the murder of George Floyd, she flew to Minneapolis to march with protesters. After the shooting of Jacob Blake, she single-handedly brought her sport to a standstill when she announced she would not play her semifinal match in the Western & Southern Open. She wore a mask with the name of a different victim of police violence onto the court for each of her matches at the U.S. Open last year.

“She allows herself to really feel and experience that sadness,” said Pam Shriver, the former top player and Grand Slam doubles champion.

In May, ahead of the French Open, Osaka tried to overturn years of tennis protocol when she refused to participate in post-match news conferences because she said they put too much stress on players, especially after losses. Her stance led to an ugly confrontation with tournament organizers and her withdrawal from the tournamentafter just one match.

In Japan, where she has become a symbol of a new, multiracial vision of a traditionally homogeneous society, she embraced the honor of lighting the Olympic cauldron and becoming the face of the Games. It was her first competition since the French Open.

She has told the world about her battles with depression the past three years, a move that John McEnroe said took great courage. The seven-time Grand Slam winner, who 40 years later is still shaken by the sudden departure of Borg, his chief rival, said her candor probably helped countless people. McEnroe added that it may also make it harder for Osaka to thrive because of the increased attention it brings.

“She’s the type of player we need around the sport another 10 years, that should win a bunch of more majors hopefully, if she’s in the right head space,” McEnroe said days before the start of the U.S. Open.

After spending roughly two years on the pro tour with Swiatek, Abramowicz has concluded that players can survive careers — inevitably filled with losses and disappointment — only by working every day to build self-worth and self-confidence that is not measured by wins and rankings points but rather relationships. Only then can they find a way to enjoy the process, as enervating as it might be.

“You need to maintain the core values, because without that there is nothing,” Abramowicz said. “There is just burned ground.”
https://www.nytimes.com/2021/09/04/sports/tennis/us-open-naomi-osaka.html
Pros are not the only ones made miserable playing tennis.
 

yossarian

Professional
Should a suicide watch be formed for the forum resident expert on every subject now that their idol has lifted his sixth runner up plate at USO? Please advise, @yossarian .

Fly Eagles Fly!
Our favorite poster has been radio silent since yesterday's final but now is sporting a Medvedev avatar? We are very curious what bandwagon he will jump on next
 

stringertom

Bionic Poster
I may have discovered the real reason for the name Five Guys. I just ordered a large fries about an hour ago and have not even touched the fries in the L cup; there’s about the same amount left in the bag and I am full. Breakfast and lunch tomorrow.

I also resisted the urge to use the ketchup provided; why mask the taste of fresh Idaho spud from Baker ID, fried in peanut oil on demand and then lightly salted. Five guys could dine on that!
 

Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
Disney+ is killing the blockbuster movie with its identikit mega-hits
David Alexander
Wed 15 Sep 2021


The modern blockbuster has found a solid, apparently winning formula, so it plays safe and endlessly replicates itself. The popular film landscape consequently becomes drained of original content. This is the Disney+model of film-making: it commands the current box office and adds to the corporation’s voracious on-demand library of identikit mega-hits. The films Disney makes follow this template, and increasingly so do those of its competitors.

The baseline is this: Disney needs to maintain simultaneous interest both in its new releases and in its growing catalogue of previously released on-demand movies. It needs to keep audiences seeing Disney films in cinemas while also driving up subscriptions to Disney+. Franchises suits these needs, to mutual benefit. Audiences binge vast franchises on Disney+, then rush to watch their newest instalments in cinemas. Equally, audiences watch hyped-up franchise sequels on the big screen, and then hurry to catch up on the rest of that film’s universe through Disney+.

Franchises existed before Disney+, but the streaming service is defined by them and, after the pandemic, it’s now all but indestructible. After launching in November 2019, Disney+ signed up over 50m subscribers in five months. It managed 103.9 million by June 2021. Netflix took over a decade to reach only double that. The development of Disney+ is now Disney’s primary business imperative, so naturally the development of franchises – the lifeblood of the streaming service, filling vast repositories of content – dominates its film-making.


The truth is that, decades from now, the Disney-era blockbuster will be as quaint and uninteresting as the 1930s melodrama or the 1950s western. A few high-quality exceptions will be celebrated, and the rest will congeal into a dated mass of capes, quips and cameos. The Disney-era blockbuster will become an embarrassing relic, from when business controlled culture and decided to run it into the ground.

In the meantime, does anyone have a Disney+ login I could use?
https://www.theguardian.com/film/2021/sep/15/disney-plus-blockbuster-movie



Words from the pen of Jim Morrison – AUM Magazine 1969
May 1, 1969

Observations, comments, and pithy remarks excepted from Jim’s book The Lords, printed this spring- about 200 copies for his friends, he says:

Film confers a kind of spurious eternity.

Phantasmagoria, magic-lantern shows, spectacles without substance. They achieved complete sensory experiences through noise, incense, lighting, water. There may be a time when we’ll attend Weather Theatres to recall the sensation of rain.

Cinema is most totalitarian of the arts. All energy and sensation is sucked into the skull, a cerebral erection, skull bloated with blood. Caligula wished a single neck for all his subjects that he could behead a kingdom with one blow. Cinema is this transforming agent. The body exists for the snake of the eyes; it becomes a dry stalk to support these two soft insatiable jewels.

Film spectators are quiet vampires.

The Lords appease us with images. They give us books, concerts, galleries, shows, cinemas. Especially the cinemas. Through art they confuse us and blind us to our enslavement. Art adorns our prison walls, keeps us silent and diverted and indifferent.

There are no longer “dancers,” the possessed. The cleavage of men into actor and spectators is the central fact of our time. We are obsessed with heroes who live for us and whom we punish. If all the radios and televisions were deprived of their sources of power, all books and paintings burned tomorrow, all shows and cinemas closed, all the arts of vicarious existence…
https://thedoors.com/news/words-from-the-very-pen-of-jim-morrison-himself-aum-magazine-1969



I’m interested in film because to me it’s the closest approximation in art that we have to the actual flow of consciousness, in both dreamlife and in the everyday perception of the world.
-- Jim Morrison
 
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stringertom

Bionic Poster
@sureshs , as host of the upcoming ATP250 at Barnes Tennis Center, should you not be honored to originate the tournament thread in PMR?

I think you had better do it real soon. One prominent forum member is already predicting that FAA will leave your fair city with a trophy and the end of his dismal 0-8 streak in ATP Finals.

Perhaps you could do a mental strength tutorial with him over a bowl of gulab jamuns and get him over the hump with a “See the ball, eat the ball!” mantra.
 

sureshs

Bionic Poster
@sureshs , as host of the upcoming ATP250 at Barnes Tennis Center, should you not be honored to originate the tournament thread in PMR?

I think you had better do it real soon. One prominent forum member is already predicting that FAA will leave your fair city with a trophy and the end of his dismal 0-8 streak in ATP Finals.

Perhaps you could do a mental strength tutorial with him over a bowl of gulab jamuns and get him over the hump with a “See the ball, eat the ball!” mantra.
I might play FAA in the final if he makes it
 

Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
An amusing assessment of Danes from the 1970s:





CIA: "Danes are backless spies"
A CIA report from the Cold War regrets that it is difficult to hire Danish spies: Danes are pacifist and self-sufficient and do not care about a major issue. They're trying to cover themselves.

Poul Høi
Foreign correspondent

Sunday, February 22, 2015

It is not easy to be a CIA agent in Denmark. For the Danes, it is astonishingly difficult to hire as a spy and also backless if it burns on. The Danes want to cooperate at best, but they do not want to commit - and forget all about appealing to a bigger cause and a better morale. It does not turn them on.

"Over the years, we have recruited a number of willing collaborators, but only very few spies in the classical sense," concludes a local CIA leader in the report "Scandinavians as Agents".

The report, which dates from 1971, is a secret American work tool that at a critical time during the Cold War tried to assess the Scandinavians' usefulness as spies. The report has since been declassified and archived. Berlingske has found it in the National Archives.

And what can we learn about ourselves?

The report is generally an exercise in generalizations but with exactly so much point that it has not only historical value. The writer calls himself Max A. Hatzenbeuhler, which is a pseudonym for several CIA agents with field experience from the Scandinavian countries.

In the Danish section, the author first tries to dispel a myth: Almost all CIA agents dream of coming to Denmark, they dream of their homeland for "open sandwiches, Tuborg, Tivoli ... Hamlet and blondes", but the reality is not only a "hedonistic paradise," he warns.

Firstly, there are the winters, and they are long and bad, and secondly, there are the Danes, and they are very Danish - and also politically non-committal.

»The Danes are aware that their small country is playing a line dance in the big political game, and they are aware that their economic survival depends on being friends with everyone (...) Denmark has not fought a war since 1864, and that war was merely the last in a long series of humiliating defeats. Since then, pacifism and neutrality have been heavy factors in Danish politics and personal philosophy (...) Denmark only became a reluctant member of NATO, Denmark consistently does not give much to NATO, and the continued membership is lukewarm at best. "

The red dairy cow
A CIA agent in Denmark must understand that the Danes are products of "one of the most well-structured welfare states" with a "homogeneous population composition". Welfare and homogeneity have created a broad middle class with few extremes and few opportunities for economic excellence, which has created a religious sense of compromise, the report states:

»Compromise is the guiding principle in all Danish public and private life. The philosophy of not having large arm movements permeates all conditions and is almost oriental in its execution. Do not contradict - it makes people angry. Do not quarrel - it is not worth the trouble. Do not say no - maybe the problem will go away on its own. Just follow the flow - there is a little good and a little bad in everything. Not for nothing has it been proposed to make the red Danish dairy cow a national symbol. It is not particularly good at giving either milk or meat, but it does give a bit of both. "

In other words, the Danes are knot people, the CIA believes. It is also expressed in politics. The Danes are afraid to give themselves completely out, because thus they open up and invite ridicule. It also means that you will rarely experience a Dane expressing unbridled patriotism. The Danes also do not want to express a special loyalty to Denmark as a political entity. Instead, they express their community as a community about a way of life or a philosophy of life, and they have an idea that the rest of the world should be like Denmark, the report states.

The Danes hate violence - violence is "a human deviation" - and therefore the Danes also believe in international cooperation in, for example, the UN and in humanitarian organizations as the path to human perfection. The Danes also never stay too good at criticizing problems in other countries - not least the United States.

»This often means that the Danes are saved for the rest of the world, and the level of criticism seems to increase in proportion to the problem's distance from Denmark. But ask the Danes about their treatment of the Eskimos in Greenland, and you will experience a rigid look and a quick change of subject.

Espionage as a status symbol
All those qualities come into play when an American CIA agent tries to hire a Danish spy:

First, an American leadership officer must understand that he should not consider a Danish spy as his recruit, but rather as "his partner" - this is important for a Dane's self-understanding.

Secondly, he must understand that the Dane is attracted to espionage as an alternative status symbol. In an egalitarian society like the Danish one, it is difficult to feel special, and espionage is an opportunity to 'break free from the pupa that the state and society weave around him. It gives his safe middle-class life a bit of spice, he experiences a mental boost in relation to the masses (...) and gets drained of his frustrations. "

The Americans' description of the Dane as a spy sounds like a cat owner's description of a cat's loyalty:

»Only very rarely do you experience a Dane who makes a moral association with the recruitment agent and the lead officer. As long as our tasks are compatible with his culture and his society, he cooperates willingly, but without committing himself morally. Fighting against Soviet imperialism or defending Western culture does not turn on the average Dane, "the report states.

»The Dane bases his willingness to work with the leadership officer on mutual respect and cooperation. If he feels his basic cultural or personal life is threatened by the collaboration, he will withdraw or save his back by going to his friends or to the authorities. Only rarely will a Dane allow himself to be drawn into a situation that he cannot get out of again ».

The report was published in 1971 in the CIA's journal Studies in Intelligence, published by the intelligence department's education department, which was so secret that agents were not allowed to talk about it or confirm its existence. It was not until 1992 that the CIA confirmed that it had an internal journal, and later that year it began to be published in a declassified form.
https://www-berlingske-dk.translate..._x_tr_tl=en&_x_tr_hl=en&_x_tr_pto=nui,sc,elem

 

stringertom

Bionic Poster
In your burrito:



Black beans, pinto beans or refried beans?

I don’t mind the other examples and I have eaten fine authentic Cuban recipes of black bean soup (one of my first meals as a teenager in FL started with an appetizer of black bean soup topped with shredded queso and raw onions). I’m referring to the various frozen patties advertised as a meat alternative in the grocery store. They are much inferior to my first buy of Boca patties, primarily made of soybean.
 

Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
I don’t mind the other examples and I have eaten fine authentic Cuban recipes of black bean soup (one of my first meals as a teenager in FL started with an appetizer of black bean soup topped with shredded queso and raw onions). I’m referring to the various frozen patties advertised as a meat alternative in the grocery store. They are much inferior to my first buy of Boca patties, primarily made of soybean.
Yeah, there is a big variation. I like Boca patties (they make different versions) and some Gardein products. Many vegans and vegetarians prefer patties that aren't meant to replicate the taste of meat.

Impossible Foods tries to appeal to people who like the taste of meat, with the notion that cattle and other animal farming are unsustainable on a mass scale. From both an environmental and economic perspective, animal farming is inefficient. Impossible Foods does a good job of replicating the taste of beef, and has more recently added plant-based protein that replicates pork and chicken.
 

stringertom

Bionic Poster
Yeah, there is a big variation. I like Boca patties (they make different versions) and some Gardein products. Many vegans and vegetarians prefer patties that aren't meant to replicate the taste of meat.

Impossible Foods tries to appeal to people who like the taste of meat, with the notion that cattle and other animal farming are unsustainable on a mass scale. From both an environmental and economic perspective, animal farming is inefficient. Impossible Foods does a good job of replicating the taste of beef, and has more recently added plant-based protein that replicates pork and chicken.
This was Gardein brand. They were finally affordable on a BOGO deal. It was still not worth it.

You’re preaching to a well educated crowd here. I saw the really informative documentary produced by CNN where they went into the labs of many of the best non-meat brands to discuss their very good ideas. Unfortunately, the curve to get in the same range in price as real meat is not very steep. I really can’t afford any of their offerings unless it’s steeply discounted.
 
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3loudboys

Legend
Extract from a BBC article - perhaps giving up drinking is not so good...

"A Lithuanian man has had more than a kilogram of nails, screws, nuts and knives removed from his stomach by doctors, local media report. He had been swallowing metal objects for a month after quitting alcohol, doctors said. Some of the objects retrieved during a surgery in Klaipeda University Hospital were 10cm (4in) long, according to Lithuania's LRT public broadcaster.

Surgeon Sarunas Dailidenas called it a "unique case". In its article (in Lithuanian), LRT published a KUH photo showing a surgical tray full of metal objects after the emergency three-hour operation. The man was brought by ambulance with severe abdominal pain to the hospital on the Baltic Sea coast. He is now reported to be in a stable condition, and is being monitored at KUH."
 

Sudacafan

Talk Tennis Guru
Extract from a BBC article - perhaps giving up drinking is not so good...

"A Lithuanian man has had more than a kilogram of nails, screws, nuts and knives removed from his stomach by doctors, local media report. He had been swallowing metal objects for a month after quitting alcohol, doctors said. Some of the objects retrieved during a surgery in Klaipeda University Hospital were 10cm (4in) long, according to Lithuania's LRT public broadcaster.

Surgeon Sarunas Dailidenas called it a "unique case". In its article (in Lithuanian), LRT published a KUH photo showing a surgical tray full of metal objects after the emergency three-hour operation. The man was brought by ambulance with severe abdominal pain to the hospital on the Baltic Sea coast. He is now reported to be in a stable condition, and is being monitored at KUH."
The actual cause was that the metals were attracted into his body by the covid vaccines he took. This became even worse with the recommended 15 days of not drinking alcohol after the shots in order not to affect immunity.
 
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Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
Extract from a BBC article - perhaps giving up drinking is not so good...

"A Lithuanian man has had more than a kilogram of nails, screws, nuts and knives removed from his stomach by doctors, local media report. He had been swallowing metal objects for a month after quitting alcohol, doctors said. Some of the objects retrieved during a surgery in Klaipeda University Hospital were 10cm (4in) long, according to Lithuania's LRT public broadcaster.

Surgeon Sarunas Dailidenas called it a "unique case". In its article (in Lithuanian), LRT published a KUH photo showing a surgical tray full of metal objects after the emergency three-hour operation. The man was brought by ambulance with severe abdominal pain to the hospital on the Baltic Sea coast. He is now reported to be in a stable condition, and is being monitored at KUH."
 

stringertom

Bionic Poster
Brentford Bees are engaging to watch in their first promotion to top level British football since post-war era. Their extra time takedown of West Ham 2-1 vaulted them to 7th on the table and just 4 points from the top.
 

stringertom

Bionic Poster
Could have been even more and it’s a real reward for hard work. Popped a few bubbles.

Can’t see this in USA but I upgraded to Peacock Plus just to have access to Brentford matches. I saw the whole game and went from disappointment and fear of the Hammers adding a second at closing time to a loud scream of joy when Wissa struck that laser before the end.
 

3loudboys

Legend
Can’t see this in USA but I upgraded to Peacock Plus just to have access to Brentford matches. I saw the whole game and went from disappointment and fear of the Hammers adding a second at closing time to a loud scream of joy when Wissa struck that laser before the end.
They have been a real breath of fresh air upsetting the more established teams - their front man Toney looks really good and has put some great performances in so far this seasain - will be putting him in my Fantasy Football Team in the next round of transfers.
 

3loudboys

Legend
Shatner aged 90 is going into space...will be the oldest man to have boldly gone where no man has gone before.


'The actor who played Captain Kirk in the Star Trek series is set to embark on a real-life journey into space. US tech billionaire Jeff Bezos's space travel company Blue Origin confirmed that William Shatner would be blasting off from Texas on 12 October. Aged 90, the actor will become the oldest person to have flown into space. "I've heard about space for a long time now. I'm taking the opportunity to see it for myself. What a miracle," Shatner said in a statement.'
 

stringertom

Bionic Poster
They have been a real breath of fresh air upsetting the more established teams - their front man Toney looks really good and has put some great performances in so far this seasain - will be putting him in my Fantasy Football Team in the next round of transfers.
Pinnock as a throw-in specialist wreaks havoc on how teams defend them, making out of bounds miscues almost as dangerous as corner kicks.
 
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