Tips for not destroying the body on hardcourt?

Demented

Semi-Pro
First, stop using NSAID's. They destroy cartilage. There has been a lot of research done in the last 10 years and your body needs inflammation to restore articular cartilage and tendon/ligament. Tylenol if you absolutely need something or the IPA option... I indulge multiple times per night in that remedy.

Obviously take the knee trio... glucosamine/chondroiton/msm if it's a regular issue.

The best thing I've ever done is discover Footprint Insole/Artilage impact foam insoles. All factory insoles are trash. The finest impact absorbing insole that I've found is made by a company that produces crash impact foam for aviation. It's the real deal. Even if my knees are sore, I can still sprint for drop shots and do a rapid stop on hard court with no shock/pain while these are in. My major issue is wearing them out quickly. The 19.99(5 mm) version from Amazon lasts me ~2 months playing 6-8 hours a week. I tried the custom (49.99)8mm version that you bake in the oven and then mold to your feet this time. We'll see how long they last.
 

Bagumbawalla

Hall of Fame
I am guessing that for you could find a hard court somewhere and get permission to resurface it with a more cushioned surface- for about $10,000 or so- depending.
If you get enough concerned individuals to contribute, the cost might not be that bad (per person)- then put a lock on the gate and buy enough key to go around.
 

taydbear7

Semi-Pro
I like the idea of changing the shoes often! I think I need to change them 2 times a year minimum. It is true that the difference between used and new shoes is noticable, even if the used shoes are not very old
You will notice when you start sliding or slipping. I have one where it wasn't old and it looks great on top but when I flipped them over and it was shocked to see there is little traction left on them. I save those not for practice shoes where the only time I use them is when I practice against my ball machine.
 

Moveforwardalways

Hall of Fame
What you are doing while not playing tennis is more important than what you do while playing. The most important are already emphasized above - get new shoes more often than you think you need to and lose weight. In addition, spend time in the gym doing strength training, to include squats of some kind (even if unweighted or “body weight” squats) and lower back strengthening exercises. Also, as you age, yoga is invaluable to extending your quality playing days. Some of you older guys will scoff at this, but almost every ATP player does yoga of some sort. You don’t have to join a yoga studio, just search YouTube for yoga at home. If you are 50+ years old and you can hold these yoga poses and still breath normally, it goes a long way to protecting you against those small nagging injuries that accumulate over time.
 

2ndServe

Hall of Fame
First, stop using NSAID's. They destroy cartilage. There has been a lot of research done in the last 10 years and your body needs inflammation to restore articular cartilage and tendon/ligament. Tylenol if you absolutely need something or the IPA option... I indulge multiple times per night in that remedy.

Obviously take the knee trio... glucosamine/chondroiton/msm if it's a regular issue.

The best thing I've ever done is discover Footprint Insole/Artilage impact foam insoles. All factory insoles are trash. The finest impact absorbing insole that I've found is made by a company that produces crash impact foam for aviation. It's the real deal. Even if my knees are sore, I can still sprint for drop shots and do a rapid stop on hard court with no shock/pain while these are in. My major issue is wearing them out quickly. The 19.99(5 mm) version from Amazon lasts me ~2 months playing 6-8 hours a week. I tried the custom (49.99)8mm version that you bake in the oven and then mold to your feet this time. We'll see how long they last.
My knees and back feel terrible after playing, I tried searching for something like that and all I got was gamechangers insole that are not in stock. Can you message me a link thx
 

socallefty

Hall of Fame
almost every ATP player does yoga of some sort.
I have never heard of this and I know coaches of some lower-ranked players. Can you please give some background on why you think this is true or links to articles mentioning players who do yoga? Apart from Djokovic, I don’t know any other pros who talk about doing yoga. It sounds good, but is it true?

They all do many flexibility workouts, but I don’t think yoga is common on the tour at all.
 
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Ronaldo

Bionic Poster
I have never heard of this and I know coaches of some lower-ranked players. Can you please give some background on why you think this is true or links to articles mentioning players who do yoga. Apart from Djokovic, I don’t know any other pros who talk about doing yoga.

They all do many flexibility workouts, but I don’t think yoga is common on the tour at all.
Even the GOAT does yoga!
 

Moveforwardalways

Hall of Fame
I have never heard of this and I know coaches of some lower-ranked players. Can you please give some background on why you think this is true or links to articles mentioning players who do yoga? Apart from Djokovic, I don’t know any other pros who talk about doing yoga. It sounds good, but is it true?

They all do many flexibility workouts, but I don’t think yoga is common on the tour at all.
I suppose it depends on what qualifies as “doing yoga”. Andy Murray, Federer, Thiem, and many others who win enough to afford to have a team that includes a full time physio have mentioned incorporating yoga or yoga based principles into their training. Many have mentioned it in interviews. Even more common on the women’s side.
 
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OnTheLine

Hall of Fame
I have never heard of this and I know coaches of some lower-ranked players. Can you please give some background on why you think this is true or links to articles mentioning players who do yoga? Apart from Djokovic, I don’t know any other pros who talk about doing yoga. It sounds good, but is it true?

They all do many flexibility workouts, but I don’t think yoga is common on the tour at all.
Don't know about the tour ... but our high performance kids at the club (think homeschooled nothing but tennis and tournament circuit kids) have yoga sessions as part of the program.

I also think that "yoga" has morphed well past the classic Yoga and has become quite integrated in a lot of training programs.
 

EddieBrock

Professional
This is a very valuable thread! I got really bad leg strain after playing singles on public hard courts that required going to PT. Some players that I talk to told me they won't play on those courts because they are so hard that they're bad for you and everyone gets injured.

Since then I've lost about 10 lbs, but I wonder if there is more you can do as far as footwork or specific leg strengthening or stretches before playing on hard courts. Even though I just bought some new shoes I'm still concerned about playing there.
 

Wiztardo

New User
Since i've gotten a little bit older, I have developed shin splints pretty bad when playing things like tennis or basketball on a hard court. I can do any other high intensity activity and not feel any pain at all, but something about the quick, high energy starting and stopping on a hard court was regularly giving me awful shin splints. I dealt with it for about 2 years, trying different shoes, stretches, and exercises. Finally someone asked why I hadn't tried compression sleeves. I was so freaking thankful that someone recommended this because it almost immediately completely eliminated the pain. I will not play without ankle compression sleeves and calf compression sleeves. Basically from the arch of my foot to just below the knee is a compression sleeve.

Just figured I would throw this out there for anyone who might be suffering the same as I was. It helped me immensely.
 

OnTheLine

Hall of Fame
Since i've gotten a little bit older, I have developed shin splints pretty bad when playing things like tennis or basketball on a hard court. I can do any other high intensity activity and not feel any pain at all, but something about the quick, high energy starting and stopping on a hard court was regularly giving me awful shin splints. I dealt with it for about 2 years, trying different shoes, stretches, and exercises. Finally someone asked why I hadn't tried compression sleeves. I was so freaking thankful that someone recommended this because it almost immediately completely eliminated the pain. I will not play without ankle compression sleeves and calf compression sleeves. Basically from the arch of my foot to just below the knee is a compression sleeve.

Just figured I would throw this out there for anyone who might be suffering the same as I was. It helped me immensely.
Oftentimes what presents itself as shin splints may in fact be a lower back issue as well ... glad the compression socks/sleeves worked for you
 

nyta2

Rookie
don't use cheap tennis sneakers... (or worse - non tennis sneakers)...
for me, i can definitely feel the difference when not using barricades or gel-resolutions...
 

Nellie

Hall of Fame
I find that 10 minutes+ of post-match stretching is a key to recovery. I also use elastic resistance bands (very cheap) to do stability work with my knees and hips (such as tying the band to form a loop and fitting the loop around my knees while shuffling sideways by bringing my knees together and apart). Of course, my preferred (but stupid) method is to try to hit a winner when the rally is more than three shots so I am never on the court more than an hour.
 

socallefty

Hall of Fame
I’m glad that there are more and more posters talking about the importance of good shoes and insoles on hard courts especially for older players to prevent injuries to lower limbs. Too many players who change their strings judiciously or play with flexible racquets to prevent arm injuries then play with soft, lightweight shoes till they develop holes and complain about sore knees, sore calves, plantar injuries etc.

I’ve been averaging playing more than 250 times a year for more than a decade after I turned 40 with more than 65% of it being singles because I’m very careful with my equipment choices and recovery regimen. There’s no reason to think that you can’t play a lot on hard courts as soon you turn forty or fifty - it just takes more preparation and planning.


don't use cheap tennis sneakers... (or worse - non tennis sneakers)...
for me, i can definitely feel the difference when not using barricades or gel-resolutions...
nthing.. lose weight and good fitting shoes with quality insoles or any insoles than the originals that come with the shoe.
 
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