TODAY IS NATIONAL FRENCH FRY DAY

SystemicAnomaly

Talk Tennis Guru
French fry is something of a misnomer. They're not particularly French. The prevailing story is that, during WWI, American soldiers stationed in Belgium discovered the deep-fried potatoes and erroneously referred to them as french-fried potatoes (since French was the predominant language in Belgium). In French speaking countries, they are often referred to as les frites or pomme frites. Alternately, pomme de terre frites or patates frites.

In the UK they are often, simply, fries or chips. French fries are reportedly more popular in Belgium, Spain and, perhaps, a few other parts of Europe than they are in France.

Anyone for Belgian fries?
 
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SystemicAnomaly

Talk Tennis Guru
Sometime, back in the 19th century, café frappé was developed -- very possibly in France. A Greek-style frappé, using instant coffee, was later invented in 1957.

Despite this long history, Burger King employees insist on referring to it as FRAP. If you ask for a Frappé, some of them don't understand your order. But usually, if you ask for frappé again, they realize that you want a BK FRAP (even tho it is BK Café Frappé on their menu).
 
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Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
sort of a French week, with Bastille Day tomorrow. Looks like steak frites both days would be the respectful thing.
My parents lived in Paris before I was born, and we always celebrated Bastille Day with French bakery treats when I was a kid.
Hawaiian sweet bread is really Portuguese sweet bread. And, apparently, chop suey was invented in the late 19th century in New York City
Viennese bread (Wienerbrød)



It turns out that the Danes actually have a name for what we call a danish, and that is Viennese bread (wienerbrød). So, they must call it Wienerbrød in Vienna, right? Nope. According to Wikipedia, the Viennese call them “Kopenhagener Plunder, referring to Copenhagen, or Dänischer Plunder“.
Huh?
It feels like we’re in a bit of an infinite loop here. How does that work? The Danes name their pastry after Austria and the Austrians name it after Denmark.
https://wisdombiscuits.com/what-do-they-call-danish-pastries-in-denmark/

Can you keep a secret? Danish pastries are not really Danish! In Denmark, these world-famous sticky delights are called Vienna Bread (wienerbrød), as they were first made in Denmark in the 1840s by Austrian bakers. Still, Danish pastries rose in popularity over the centuries and are now a firm favourite of ordinary Danes.
https://www.visitdenmark.com/denmark/things-do/danish-food/traditional-danish-food
 

Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
French fry is something of a misnomer. They're not particularly French. The prevailing story is that, during WWII, American soldiers stationed in Belgium discovered the deep-fried potatoes and erroneously referred to them as french-fried potatoes (since French was the predominant language in Belgium). In French speaking countries, they are often referred to as les frites or pomme frites. Alternately, pomme de terre frites or patates frites.

In the UK they are often, simply, fries or chips. French fries are reportedly more popular in Belgium, Spain and, perhaps, a few other parts of Europe than they are in France.

Anyone for Belgian fries?
Here's more:




The French fry—though indisputably a fry—may not actually be French. Some claim that fries originated in Belgium, where villagers along the River Meuse traditionally ate fried fish. In winter, when the river froze, the fish-deprived villagers fried potatoes instead. It’s said that this dish was discovered by American soldiers in Belgium during World War I and, since the dominant language of southern Belgium is French, they dubbed the tasty potatoes “French” fries.

Alternatively, French fries really were French, first sold by street vendors on Paris’s Pont Neuf in the 1780s. Or they may even be Spanish, since the Spaniards, after all, were the first Europeans to encounter the South American potato. The first written mention seems to have been that of Pedro Cieza de Leon, a teenage conquistador turned historian, who in 1553 published a memoir of his experiences titled The Chronicle of the Incas, or the Seventeen-Year Travel of Pedro Cieza de Leon Throughout the Mighty Kingdom of Peru. In it, he describes the potato, one of the principal foods of the natives, as “a kind of earth nut which, after it is boiled, is as tender as cooked chestnuts.” Brought home to Spain, the Incan potatoes may very well have been served fried—frying in oil was a Spanish culinary tradition—though the end result wouldn’t have looked much like a French fry, since early potatoes were lumpy and no bigger than golf balls.

Thomas Jefferson—possibly the first American foodie—is generally credited with introducing the French fry to America; and in his case the fries were definitely French, Jefferson having encountered them while serving as American Minister to France from 1784 to 1789. Jefferson had his slave James Heming—brother of the famous Sally—trained as a chef during his stay in France, and about 150 recipes that he collected at the time have survived, some recorded in Jefferson’s own hand, others transcribed and passed down by his granddaughters. Among these are such current all-American favorites as vanilla ice cream, macaroni and cheese (for which Jefferson sent to Naples for a “maccaroni machine”), and fried potatoes, which Jefferson originally knew as pommes de terre frites à cru en petites tranches (potatoes deep-fried while raw, in small cuttings).
https://www.nationalgeographic.com/...15/01/08/are-french-fries-truly-french/#close
 

Bartelby

Bionic Poster
So Black Americans are the real hero of the story concerning French Fries. Maybe they should be called Black Freedom Fries?

Thomas Jefferson—possibly the first American foodie—is generally credited with introducing the French fry to America; and in his case the fries were definitely French, Jefferson having encountered them while serving as American Minister to France from 1784 to 1789. Jefferson had his slave James Heming—brother of the famous Sally—trained as a chef during his stay in France, and about 150 recipes that he collected at the time have survived, some recorded in Jefferson’s own hand, others transcribed and passed down by his granddaughters. Among these are such current all-American favorites as vanilla ice cream, macaroni and cheese (for which Jefferson sent to Naples for a “maccaroni machine”), and fried potatoes, which Jefferson originally knew as pommes de terre frites à cru en petites tranches (potatoes deep-fried while raw, in small cuttings).
https://www.nationalgeographic.com/...15/01/08/are-french-fries-truly-french/#close
 
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Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
French Fries Around the World
BY MISS CELLANIA



At one time, potatoes were only eaten by Americans. Then Columbus came along, and potatoes spread all over the globe, where people eat them in all manners, but none more than fried. Hot fried potatoes, crispy on the outside and tender on the inside, are so universal that they are often just called “fries” in the local language. But once you’ve cooked them and named them, the method of eating them varies from place to place. Of course, in any country there are many different preferences, but tradition and taste fall into different styles in different places.

Belgium
Belgium is considered to be the birthplace of the fried potato. Belgian fries (frites) are the centerpiece of a meal, not just a side dish. And Belgian chefs are very proud of their fries, competing to serve the best in their chip shops, or frietkotten. They are served hot in cardboard cones to make them easy to eat as you stroll, and a variety of sauces are offered to top them.

Netherlands
Fries in the Netherlands are cooked in the manner of Belgian fries, but Americans may be dismayed by the Dutch choice of condiment:mayonnaise. Dutch mayonnaise is a little spicier than American mayonnaise, and Yanks who’ve lived there become used to the flavor on their fries, and often grow to love it.

France
Although a variety of sauces and dips are available for pommes frites, rémoulade is very popular, not only in France, where it originated, but in Denmark, Iceland, and Scandinavia. Rémoulade has a mayonnaise base, with the addition of pickles, horseradish, curry, anchovies, or other flavorings. It was developed for use on seafood, somewhat like tartar sauce, but is used on a variety of dishes. The flavor and appearance of rémoulade varies by region.

Japan
In fast food restaurants in Japan, fries (furaido potato) are offered with seasoning powders to sprinkle on top. The toppings come in a variety of flavors made with dried soy or other sauce, ground seeds or seaweed, and spice mixtures. A few fast food outlets will provide a bag in which to shake your fries with the flavoring powder of your choice. This custom is also followed in Hong Kong, Singapore, and other Asian locales where fries are sold in fast food outlets.

Canada
In 1957, French Canadian chef Fernand Lachance took fries and make them into a heavenly mess called poutine. Hot fries are topped with gravy and cheese curds, all served hot so the flavors will meld. Poutine became a hit, although some call the calorie-laden snack “junk food.” It spread across Canada, and is even served at some fast food chains. There are annual poutine festivals held in Ottawa, Toronto, Vancouver, Fredericton, Drummondville, and even Chicago.

United Kingdom
In Britain, fries are called chips, as in fish and chips, and chips as we knew them are called crisps. Chips are traditionally eaten with a sprinkling of malt vinegar and then salt. Chip shops once served them on newspapers in lieu of paper plates, and today paper is often used instead of boxes or plates. However, as this recent article points out, there are regional differences and a newer tradition of curry chips, due to Indian influence on British food. Some prefer non-malt vinegar or HP sauce. As the thousand+ comments point out, there is no consensus on the matter.

United States
The most common way to eat fries in the U.S. is with ketchup, although that may be because restaurants rarely offer any other choice. There are plenty of other toppings, including cheese, chili, hot sauce, barbecue sauce, onions, ranch dressing, and the sauces used in other nations. In restaurants, you often have to pay extra for them.

In researching fries in other countries and in the US, a couple of generalities came up again and again. Food critics and chefs agree that the best fries are cooked twice: first frying them at a low temperature or boiling them to make the potatoes tender, and then frying at a hotter temperature to make the outside hot and crisp. And most agree that animal fat makes better tasting fries than any vegetable oil. Enjoy your fries!
https://www.mentalfloss.com/article/59211/french-fries-around-world
 

Sudacafan

Bionic Poster
French fry is something of a misnomer. They're not particularly French. The prevailing story is that, during WWII, American soldiers stationed in Belgium discovered the deep-fried potatoes and erroneously referred to them as french-fried potatoes (since French was the predominant language in Belgium). In French speaking countries, they are often referred to as les frites or pomme frites. Alternately, pomme de terre frites or patates frites.

In the UK they are often, simply, fries or chips. French fries are reportedly more popular in Belgium, Spain and, perhaps, a few other parts of Europe than they are in France.

Anyone for Belgian fries?
In South America fried potatoes are everywhere. Especially in Argentina.
The milanesa con papas fritas is one of the most popular dishes there.
 
D

Deleted member 768841

Guest
I had some boss fries earlier today, and they were god like. What I would give to have fries like that all the time... oh and by the way, steak cut fries are an abomination.
 

Bartelby

Bionic Poster
I've never really preferred french fries over other sorts of fried potato, which is not to say that I don't like them, although fast food french fries are lamentable.

At the moment I have a preference for oven-baked Kipfler chips.
 
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TheGhostOfAgassi

Talk Tennis Guru
French Fries Around the World
BY MISS CELLANIA



At one time, potatoes were only eaten by Americans. Then Columbus came along, and potatoes spread all over the globe, where people eat them in all manners, but none more than fried. Hot fried potatoes, crispy on the outside and tender on the inside, are so universal that they are often just called “fries” in the local language. But once you’ve cooked them and named them, the method of eating them varies from place to place. Of course, in any country there are many different preferences, but tradition and taste fall into different styles in different places.

Belgium
Belgium is considered to be the birthplace of the fried potato. Belgian fries (frites) are the centerpiece of a meal, not just a side dish. And Belgian chefs are very proud of their fries, competing to serve the best in their chip shops, or frietkotten. They are served hot in cardboard cones to make them easy to eat as you stroll, and a variety of sauces are offered to top them.

Netherlands
Fries in the Netherlands are cooked in the manner of Belgian fries, but Americans may be dismayed by the Dutch choice of condiment:mayonnaise. Dutch mayonnaise is a little spicier than American mayonnaise, and Yanks who’ve lived there become used to the flavor on their fries, and often grow to love it.

France
Although a variety of sauces and dips are available for pommes frites, rémoulade is very popular, not only in France, where it originated, but in Denmark, Iceland, and Scandinavia. Rémoulade has a mayonnaise base, with the addition of pickles, horseradish, curry, anchovies, or other flavorings. It was developed for use on seafood, somewhat like tartar sauce, but is used on a variety of dishes. The flavor and appearance of rémoulade varies by region.

Japan
In fast food restaurants in Japan, fries (furaido potato) are offered with seasoning powders to sprinkle on top. The toppings come in a variety of flavors made with dried soy or other sauce, ground seeds or seaweed, and spice mixtures. A few fast food outlets will provide a bag in which to shake your fries with the flavoring powder of your choice. This custom is also followed in Hong Kong, Singapore, and other Asian locales where fries are sold in fast food outlets.

Canada
In 1957, French Canadian chef Fernand Lachance took fries and make them into a heavenly mess called poutine. Hot fries are topped with gravy and cheese curds, all served hot so the flavors will meld. Poutine became a hit, although some call the calorie-laden snack “junk food.” It spread across Canada, and is even served at some fast food chains. There are annual poutine festivals held in Ottawa, Toronto, Vancouver, Fredericton, Drummondville, and even Chicago.

United Kingdom
In Britain, fries are called chips, as in fish and chips, and chips as we knew them are called crisps. Chips are traditionally eaten with a sprinkling of malt vinegar and then salt. Chip shops once served them on newspapers in lieu of paper plates, and today paper is often used instead of boxes or plates. However, as this recent article points out, there are regional differences and a newer tradition of curry chips, due to Indian influence on British food. Some prefer non-malt vinegar or HP sauce. As the thousand+ comments point out, there is no consensus on the matter.

United States
The most common way to eat fries in the U.S. is with ketchup, although that may be because restaurants rarely offer any other choice. There are plenty of other toppings, including cheese, chili, hot sauce, barbecue sauce, onions, ranch dressing, and the sauces used in other nations. In restaurants, you often have to pay extra for them.

In researching fries in other countries and in the US, a couple of generalities came up again and again. Food critics and chefs agree that the best fries are cooked twice: first frying them at a low temperature or boiling them to make the potatoes tender, and then frying at a hotter temperature to make the outside hot and crisp. And most agree that animal fat makes better tasting fries than any vegetable oil. Enjoy your fries!
https://www.mentalfloss.com/article/59211/french-fries-around-world
We call it pommes frites.
Which means fried potatoes in french.
The most accurate to call it?

The classic dish moules frtes, shellfish with pommes frites. If you ever been south Europe and France/Belgium you have to have come across this, probably long time before it was eaten with burgers and all that. It’s delicious! If it’s on the menu in a restaurant, that’s what I am having.

 

Bartelby

Bionic Poster
If you fry food properly the oil only crisps up the surface, so the problem is junk fried food and not fried food per se.
 

Zara

Legend
Depends on what oil you use.
That's right. If fried in olive oil or coconut oil then it's not as damaging. Maybe even good for the body. However, olive oil doesn't burn as quickly so it won't be as crunchy. Alternatively, you can do it in the oven if you adjust a few things here and there to make it crunchy.
 

travlerajm

G.O.A.T.
That's right. If fried in olive oil or coconut oil then it's not as damaging. Maybe even good for the body. However, olive oil doesn't burn as quickly so it won't be as crunchy. Alternatively, you can do it in the oven if you adjust a few things here and there to make it crunchy.
Olive oil has low smoke point, so poor choice for frying. Try avocado oil - similar omega-3 / omega-6 profile to olive oil but with much higher smoke point.
 

Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
When the chips are down, EU leaders get fries


Belgian Prime Minister Sophie Wilmes and Luxembourg Prime Minister Xavier Bettel take a break from the first face-to-face EU summit since the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, and eat fries outside the Maison Antoine friterie in in Brussels, Belgium July 18, 2020 in this picture obtained from social media. Cabinet of Belgian Prime Minister Sophie Wilmes via REUTERS

BRUSSELS (Reuters) - As European leaders haggled in Brussels on Saturday over billions of euros to prop up their coronavirus-blighted economies, four prime ministers slipped away in search of comfort food: a paper cone of Belgian fries.

The snack that Americans call “French fries” - and Britons call “chips” - are such a staple dish in Belgium that roadside shacks and trailers selling “frites” were allowed to stay open during this spring’s lockdown to curb the spread of COVID-19.

Belgian Prime Minister Sophie Wilmes tweeted a photograph of herself and Luxembourg Prime Minister Xavier Bettel outside the famous Maison Antoine “friterie” clutching their booty; she had “Andalouse” sauce with her fries and Bettel chose “Samurai”.

They were joined by the prime ministers of Estonia and Malta, and all four sat together outside the restaurant in the Place Jourdan, which has also served German Chancellor Angela Merkel during breaks in previous European Union summits.

Belgium has sought to have “Belgian fries” and the culture around them recognised as a distinct part of global heritage, alongside its beer-making tradition.

Many Belgians say their country invented fries, and that it was only because U.S. troops stationed in the French-speaking part of Belgium during World War One mistakenly called them “French” that the name stuck.
https://www.reuters.com/article/us-...s-are-down-eu-leaders-get-fries-idUSKCN24J0RT
 

Bartelby

Bionic Poster
There's an awful lot of waffle in Brussels as well.

When the chips are down, EU leaders get fries

BRUSSELS (Reuters) - As European leaders haggled in Brussels on Saturday over billions of euros to prop up their coronavirus-blighted economies, four prime ministers slipped away in search of comfort food: a paper cone of Belgian fries.
 
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