Top players' match retirement history

1

15_ounce

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#1
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Novak Đoković

http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport2/hi/tennis/14609241.stm
Sunday, 21 August 2011 19:56 UK Andy Murray won a seventh Masters title as world number one Novak Djokovic retired from the Cincinnati final with a shoulder injury at 6-4 3-0 down.

http://www.tennis-x.com/xblog/2010-05-07/4104.php
May 7th, 2010 Djokovic found himself down a set 6-4 to upstart Filip Krajinovic when the World No. 2 thought it better to quit because of allergies (and illness) then to keep playing and give his 18-year-old countryman a proper win.

http://sports.espn.go.com/sports/tennis/aus09/news/story?id=3862145
Updated: January 27, 2009, 2:09 PM ET
Defending champion Djokovic retires
ESPN.com news services
MELBOURNE, Australia -- Novak Djokovic's hopes for a second straight Australian Open title died under a broiling sun Tuesday.
With ice packs and massages failing to provide relief, third-ranked Djokovic looked increasingly woozy and had to give up while trailing 6-7 (3), 6-4, 6-2, 2-1, allowing No. 7 Andy Roddick to claim a spot in the semifinals.

http://dalje.com/en-sports/federer-reaches-final-after-djokovic-retires/143783
The Swiss top seed was leading 6-3 3-2 when Djokovic complained that he felt dizzy and retired. World number one Roger Federer reached the Monte Carlo Masters final when Serbian Novak Djokovic pulled out of their semi-final on Saturday. The Swiss top seed was leading 6-3 3-2 when Djokovic complained that he felt dizzy and retired.

http://www.gmanews.tv/story/79973/ailing-djokovic-retires-after-3rd-set-giving-russia-win-over-serbia-in-davis-cup
Ailing Djokovic retires after 3rd set, giving Russia win over Serbia in Davis Cup
2/10/2008 | 10:14 PM
MOSCOW – An ailing Novak Djokovic retired despite leading in the first reverse singles match Sunday, giving Russia an insurmountable 3-1 lead over Serbia and a spot in the Davis Cup quarterfinals.
Djokovic, who was playing his first singles match since winning the Australian Open, was leading Nikolay Davydenko 6-4, 6-3, 4-6 when he quit.

http://uk.reuters.com/article/2007/07/07/tennis-wimbledon-nadal-idUKB57466420070707
LONDON, July 7 | Sat Jul 7, 2007 2:00pm BST
(Reuters) - Second seed Rafael Nadal reached the Wimbledon final on Saturday after Serb Novak Djokovic retired hurt with the Spaniard leading their semi-final 3-6 6-1 4-1.

http://www.usatoday.com/sports/tennis/2006-07-30-croatia-open_x.htm
Wawrinka wins Croatia Open when Djokovic retires
Posted 7/30/2006 4:45 PM ET
UMAG, Croatia (AP) — Stanislas Wawrinka won his first ATP title when favored Novak Djokovic retired with breathing problems during the first set of the Croatian Open final on Sunday.


summary:

33/2011 ATP Cincinnati (USA) Hard Andy Murray Novak Djokovic 6-4 3-0 ret. Final
18/2010 ATP Belgrade (SRB) Clay Filip Krajinovic Novak Djokovic 6-4 ret. 1/4
3/2009 ATP Australian Open (AUS) Hard Andy Roddick Novak Djokovic 6-7(3) 6-4 6-2 2-1 ret. 1/4
17/2008 ATP Monte-Carlo (MON) Clay Roger Federer Novak Djokovic 6-3 3-2 ret. 1/2
6/2008 ATP Davis Cup, RUS-SRB 3-2 (RUS) I_Hard Nikolay Davydenko Novak Djokovic 4-6 3-6 6-4 ret. Rubber 4
26/2007 ATP Wimbledon (GBR) Grass Rafael Nadal Novak Djokovic 3-6 6-1 4-1 ret. 1/2
30/2006 ATP Umag (CRO) Clay Stanislas Wawrinka Novak Djokovic 6-6 ret. Final
22/2006 ATP French Open (FRA) Clay Rafael Nadal Novak Djokovic 6-4 6-4 ret. 1/4
40/2005 ATP Metz (FRA) I_Hard Yuriy Schukin Novak Djokovic 4-6 6-4 ret. q-Second
21/2005 ATP French Open (FRA) Clay Guillermo Coria Novak Djokovic 4-6 6-2 3-2 ret. Second
 
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1

15_ounce

Guest
#2
Rafael Nadal


http://www.guardian.co.uk/sport/2010/jan/26/andy-murray-beats-rafael-nadal-retires
Andy Murray will face Marin Cilic in the semi-finals at Melbourne Park after Rafael Nadal pulled out while trailing by two sets.
Murray leading 6-3, 7-6, 3-0 when Spaniard threw in towel


http://www.tennis-x.com/xblog/2007-08-16/264.php
Rafael Nadal retired in his match against Juan Monaco, trailing 6-7(5) 0-2, with arm cramps and dizziness.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2007-01-09/guccione-through-after-nadal-retires/2169938
Guccione, who lost in the final of the Adelaide international to Novak Djokovic on Sunday, was up 6-5 in the first set when Nadal retired and will now play Austrian Jurgen Melzer in the next round.

http://www.rediff.com/sports/2006/jun/16nadal.htm
Rafael Nadal's Wimbledon preparations suffered a blow on Friday when he had to retire from his Stella Artois quarter-final in London against Australian Lleyton Hewitt with a shoulder injury.

http://www.tennis-x.com/story/2005-01-11/p.php
The event lost another Spanish drawcard when Rafael “The Prodigy” Nadal withdrew after losing the first set against No. 3 seed and defending champion Dominik “The Dominator” Hrbaty, complaining of tightness in his chest.

http://www.menstennisblog.info/2008/10/rafel-nadal-retires-in-paris-due-to.html
Rafael Nadal was playing against Nikolay Davydenko when he was forced to retired due to a knee injury . Something happened from the beginning of the match, Rafa Nadal was without rhythm, bowed and abstracted while playing against Davydenko. His head worked, but not his body, and game to game, desperation began to draw on the face of the Spaniard. His legs did not respond and he called the physiotherapist to treat with massage his right thigh. After losing the first set 6-1 Nadal greeted with Davydenko and said goodbye to the fans at the Paris-Bercy between applause and whistles.


summary:

3/2010 ATP Australian Open (AUS) Hard Andy Murray Rafael Nadal 6-3 7-6(2) 3-0 ret. 1/4
44/2008 ATP Paris (FRA) I_Hard Nikolay Davydenko Rafael Nadal 6-1 ret. 1/4
33/2007 ATP Cincinnati (USA) Hard Juan Monaco Rafael Nadal 7-6(5) 4-1 ret. Second
2/2007 ATP Sydney (AUS) Hard Chris Guccione Rafael Nadal 6-5 ret. First
24/2006 ATP London (GBR) Grass Lleyton Hewitt Rafael Nadal 3-6 6-3 ret. 1/4
2/2005 ATP Auckland (NZL) Hard Dominik Hrbaty Rafael Nadal 6-3 ret. First
38/2003 CH St. Jean de Luz (FRA) I_Hard Richard Gasquet Rafael Nadal 6-2 ret. Second
 
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#4
Maybe the retirements of the top 2 players in the world says more about mens' tennis scheduling (and possibly about not wanting to give key opponents a psychological advantage) than it does about their health and fitness.

Nadal's and Djokovic's health issues have been widely documented. However, I get the feeling that they would both be prepared to sacrifice a lesser event to try and be at their fittest for a slam. It's not good for Masters Tournament organisers and for the fans, but in terms of slam count, and where the players want to be ranked on 31st December every year it makes sense for them to do this, even if it is unfair on the tennis-loving public (and their opponents). If I was going to be even more sceptical with my comments, I might add that it would also suit their sponsors as the slams get so much more press pages than other events.
 
#6
Nadal and Djokovic had so many retirements because they thought they will be inducted to HOF several times 5 years after each retirement. :(
 

glazkovss

Professional
#7
Almost every player retires from time to time, it is normal because of gruelling schedule and the demands of the game. The only one who almost never retires is Federer (I guess he retired only once during a match, not so long ago).
 
#8
Maybe the retirements of the top 2 players in the world says more about mens' tennis scheduling (and possibly about not wanting to give key opponents a psychological advantage) than it does about their health and fitness.

Nadal's and Djokovic's health issues have been widely documented.
How come Federer never retires from a match then? He plays a few matches too.
 

TTMR

Hall of Fame
#9
They really need to spread out the Masters tournaments more. Separating the FO, Wimbledon and the USO further would help, too.

While we're on it, Super Saturday needs to be abolished immediately. Maybe some like to question the manliness and masculinity of players that don't grind it out all the time as their bodies give out, but I would rather tennis be a sport people could play well into their thirties as opposed to almost mandating a shooting star/burnout effect in top players. Yes, yes, Federer can play a lot of matches and be healthy; however, I imagine Federer's genetics are almost superhuman. You can't ask that much of every player.
 
#12
They really need to spread out the Masters tournaments more. Separating the FO, Wimbledon and the USO further would help, too.

While we're on it, Super Saturday needs to be abolished immediately. Maybe some like to question the manliness and masculinity of players that don't grind it out all the time as their bodies give out, but I would rather tennis be a sport people could play well into their thirties as opposed to almost mandating a shooting star/burnout effect in top players. Yes, yes, Federer can play a lot of matches and be healthy; however, I imagine Federer's genetics are almost superhuman. You can't ask that much of every player.
Funny thing is, his genetics aren't all that great. His father is relatively short, and doesn't have much length limb-wise. He's like a sausage. Roger's mother isn't anything special either. Roger is basically incredibly lucky; the one in a million person who got the right genes from their family's gene pool.
 
#13
Federer withdrew from a lot of masters before they were mandatory (he even withdrew from Paris after starting playing it once, not that different from retiring). He preserved himself by limiting his playing. Smart enough but not an option for Nadal and Djoko now that masters are mandatory. Of course before mid-2003, he preserved himself by sucking at tennis and rarely making it past early rounds guaranteeing minimum wearout until almost 22. Nadal wasn't that lucky since at 18/19 he was winning masters and slams... and continued doing so. Not everybody can play mediocre tennis for their first 4 years on the tour. Some players are just too talented for that.
 
#14
Federer withdrew from a lot of masters before they were mandatory (he even withdrew from Paris after starting playing it once, not that different from retiring). He preserved himself by limiting his playing. Smart enough but not an option for Nadal and Djoko now that masters are mandatory. Of course before mid-2003, he preserved himself by sucking at tennis and rarely making it past early rounds guaranteeing minimum wearout until almost 22. Nadal wasn't that lucky since at 18/19 he was winning masters and slams... and continued doing so. Not everybody can play mediocre tennis for their first 4 years on the tour. Some players are just too talented for that.
Gold Jerry, Gold!
 

Kunohara

Professional
#15
Federer withdrew from a lot of masters before they were mandatory (he even withdrew from Paris after starting playing it once, not that different from retiring). He preserved himself by limiting his playing. Smart enough but not an option for Nadal and Djoko now that masters are mandatory. Of course before mid-2003, he preserved himself by sucking at tennis and rarely making it past early rounds guaranteeing minimum wearout until almost 22. Nadal wasn't that lucky since at 18/19 he was winning masters and slams... and continued doing so. Not everybody can play mediocre tennis for their first 4 years on the tour. Some players are just too talented for that.
Some prodigies are incapable of winning more slams than a mediocre player who sucked for the 4 first years of his career.

What does that make them ?

And what does that make YOU ?
 
#17
Some prodigies are incapable of winning more slams than a mediocre player who sucked for the 4 first years of his career.

What does that make them ?

And what does that make YOU ?



I'm not saying Fed didn't catch up later (resultwise) but in terms of wearout, it still makes a big difference.
 
#18
I'm not saying Fed didn't catch up later (resultwise) but in terms of wearout, it still makes a big difference.
I did some calculation in another thread and I calculated that July 2011 Nadal was at the same number of matches played as May 2007 Fed. So we are talking less that 1 year difference at the same age and not 4 years.
 
#19
It's not just # of matches, it's amount of time enduring the effort and the stress. Fed has a few years less in the legs no matter how you calculate it. The fact that he won more titles during the time that he was at his peak is a completely different issue. It doesn't change the fact he was sucking for years before that, years during which Nadal was kicking ass.
 
#20
Number of matches played is what matters and not the number of titles or Slams won as far as wear and tear go. The fact is that Fed was always playing smarter tennis and Nadal was just a dumb pusher until 2008 and now he is paying the price.
 
#22
Federer withdrew from a lot of masters before they were mandatory (he even withdrew from Paris after starting playing it once, not that different from retiring). He preserved himself by limiting his playing. Smart enough but not an option for Nadal and Djoko now that masters are mandatory.
Not sure what you're talking about. In 2006 for example, Roger went 92-5 without once complaining about the schedule. Even now, he plays almost as many matches as Nadal or Djokovic.

Of course before mid-2003, he preserved himself by sucking at tennis and rarely making it past early rounds guaranteeing minimum wearout until almost 22.
And how much wear-out has he faced since then? Over 900 matches on tour is not 'wear-out' enough for you?
 
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#24
Just to clarify for everyone, Nadal is now around where Fed was in 2007 FO as far as total matches played go and about October 2006 as far as age goes. So no matter how you look at it (actual age or total number of matches played) Nadal is still where prime Fed was.

To get above numbers I used their ATP pages for total number of matches played so far and then I went Fed's web site:
http://www.rogerfederer.com/en/tennis/career.html
and got his matches for each year and counted backwards. Then I looked at Fed's 2007 playing history to get the exact tournament to equal the total number of matches played so far by Nadal. So I am not making stuff up. Unless I miscalculated, Nadal is exactly where Fed was after R32 2007 FO.
 
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#28
Not sure what you're talking about. In 2006 for example, Roger went 92-5 without once complaining about the schedule.


Limiting his playing in events with tough competition like masters. In 2004, 5 or 6, Fed didn't play all masters. I think it's in 2005 he even skipped half of them.
 

cc0509

Talk Tennis Guru
#29
Federer withdrew from a lot of masters before they were mandatory (he even withdrew from Paris after starting playing it once, not that different from retiring). He preserved himself by limiting his playing. Smart enough but not an option for Nadal and Djoko now that masters are mandatory. Of course before mid-2003, he preserved himself by sucking at tennis and rarely making it past early rounds guaranteeing minimum wearout until almost 22. Nadal wasn't that lucky since at 18/19 he was winning masters and slams... and continued doing so. Not everybody can play mediocre tennis for their first 4 years on the tour. Some players are just too talented for that.
By the same token, not everybody can play awful tennis at the tender age of 25 and lose every important tournament on every surface to another player when they are supposed to be number one or two in the world. Just sayin.' That takes a particularly special talent to do that. :wink:
 

AM95

Hall of Fame
#30
It's not just # of matches, it's amount of time enduring the effort and the stress. Fed has a few years less in the legs no matter how you calculate it. The fact that he won more titles during the time that he was at his peak is a completely different issue. It doesn't change the fact he was sucking for years before that, years during which Nadal was kicking ass.
i can't even bear to read your stupid posts after you said that hard courts require no footwork/speed.

go back to the kitchen..


Limiting his playing in events with tough competition like masters. In 2004, 5 or 6, Fed didn't play all masters. I think it's in 2005 he even skipped half of them.
its also amazing how in 2005 federer had like 10 titles among which included 4 masters IW, Miami, and Cincy + Hamburg
 
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#32
Both Monfils and Almagro have retired 11 times. Where's their bashing? I don't see them getting tarred and feathered and branded a sore loser like Djokovic.
Interesting point. I think we can figure it out by asking a few other questions. Namely, how many threads are there in total about Djokovic relative to threads about Monfils, or threads about Almagro?

Similarly, how many news stories are there about Djokovic, relative to the number about Monfils or Almagro?

How important is Djokovic to tennis right now, compared to Monfils, or Almagro? Is Djokovic considered more high-profile than either of those gentlemen? Is he even considered a superior player to them, perhaps?

I think by answering those questions, we can find out why there is more discussion about this aspect of Djokovic's career compared to discussion of this aspect in Monfils' career or Almagro's career.
 
#33
i can't even bear to read your stupid posts after you said that hard courts require no footwork/speed.


I NEVER SAID IT REQUIRED NO FOOTWORK OR SPEED. I SAID FAST HARD FAVOR BIG SERVERS OVER GREAT MOVERS.






its also amazing how in 2005 federer had like 10 titles among which included 4 masters IW, Miami, and Cincy + Hamburg

PRECISELY BECAUSE HE DIDN'T PLAY ALL OF THEM, HE WAS FRESHER FOR THE ONES HE PLAYED. Fed's level in masters started dropping in 2007 and that's precisely when he had to play at least 8 every year.
 
#36
Monfils(11):


18/2011 ATP Madrid (ESP) Clay Juan Monaco Gael Monfils 6-2 3-0 ret. Second

28/2010 ATP Stuttgart (GER) Clay Albert Montanes Gael Monfils 6-2 1-2 ret. Final

41/2009 ATP Shanghai (CHN) Hard Ivan Ljubicic Gael Monfils 6-2 3-0 ret. Third

3/2009 ATP Australian Open (AUS) Hard Gilles Simon Gael Monfils 6-4 2-6 6-1 ret. Fourth

31/2008 ATP Cincinnati (USA) Hard Tommy Haas Gael Monfils 5-1 ret. Second

19/2008 ATP Rome (ITA) Clay Olivier Patience Gael Monfils 6-3 1-0 ret. Qualifying

38/2007 CH Szczecin (POL) Clay Jan Mertl Gael Monfils 6-3 2-0 ret. First

16/2007 ATP Monte Carlo (MON) Clay Radek Stepanek Gael Monfils 6-0 2-0 ret. First

42/2006 ATP Madrid (ESP) I_Hard Dominik Hrbaty Gael Monfils 3-6 2-2 ret. First

24/2006 ATP London (GBR) Grass James Blake Gael Monfils 6-1 ret. 1/4

27/2005 ATP Bastad (SWE) Clay Tommy Robredo Gael Monfils 6-4 4-2 ret. Second

http://matchstat.com/PlayerInjuries/5917

Almagro(10):


24/2010 ATP Eastbourne (GBR) Grass Denis Istomin Nicolas Almagro 6-4 1-0 ret. Second

10/2010 ATP Indian Wells (USA) Hard Andy Murray Nicolas Almagro 6-2 1-0 ret. Fourth

28/2008 ATP Stuttgart (GER) Clay Michael Berrer Nicolas Almagro 7-5 ret. Second

19/2008 ATP Rome (ITA) Clay Novak Djokovic Nicolas Almagro 6-1 1-0 ret. 1/4

8/2008 ATP Buenos Aires (ARG) Clay Juan Ignacio Chela Nicolas Almagro 6-3 2-1 ret. 1/4

37/2007 ATP Bucharest (ROU) Clay Simone Bolelli Nicolas Almagro 4-6 5-1 ret. First

16/2007 ATP Monte Carlo (MON) Clay Tomas Berdych Nicolas Almagro 5-0 ret. First

44/2006 ATP Paris (FRA) Carpet Dmitry Tursunov Nicolas Almagro 6-3 5-4 ret. Second

39/2006 ATP Palermo (ITA) Clay Filippo Volandri Nicolas Almagro 6-0 2-1 ret. 1/2

40/2004 CH Seville (ESP) Clay Alexander Waske Nicolas Almagro 5-2 ret. 1/2

http://matchstat.com/PlayerInjuries/4045
 
#38
Federer withdrew from a lot of masters before they were mandatory (he even withdrew from Paris after starting playing it once, not that different from retiring). He preserved himself by limiting his playing. Smart enough but not an option for Nadal and Djoko now that masters are mandatory. Of course before mid-2003, he preserved himself by sucking at tennis and rarely making it past early rounds guaranteeing minimum wearout until almost 22. Nadal wasn't that lucky since at 18/19 he was winning masters and slams... and continued doing so. Not everybody can play mediocre tennis for their first 4 years on the tour. Some players are just too talented for that.
LOL, it's totally different from retiring. One is bailing out knowing you're getting your ass handed to you (seems like making an excuse to me). Because, let's just be honest, hardly anyone who retires from a match does it whilst they are ahead. The other is not even attempting to play a match. I'm more likely to believe someone who withdraws than someone who retires.
 
#39
Retiring even before the match starts could seem more cowardly. I am favorable to retirement anyway. Better retiring than being bugged by injuries for weeks on end or complaining about fatigue and back for years on end. Man, I would take a few retirements over that constant whining we got from Fed month after month over mono recovering and back pain.
 
#40
LOL, it's totally different from retiring. One is bailing out knowing you're getting your ass handed to you (seems like making an excuse to me). Because, let's just be honest, hardly anyone who retires from a match does it whilst they are ahead. The other is not even attempting to play a match. I'm more likely to believe someone who withdraws than someone who retires.
Yeah but cmon, they go hand in hand. I mean if you're feeling sick/injured, you are obviously going to be playing worse than if you were 100%. So one would expect the healthy opponent to be winning(bar some huge gulf in class or something). Same thing if you become injured/sick during the match and play on for a while. Only instance where this wouldn't happen would be if you got a freak injury and retired straight away, then obviously you could have been leading but if you have been feeling bad(for whatever reason) for a pro-longed period of time, then the most logical situation, following on from that, is that you would be losing the match as well.
 
#43
How come Federer never retires from a match then? He plays a few matches too.
Because he's a freak of nature ;). And I think in his prime his scheduling has been better, which was made easier due to nobody challenging the number 1 spot for some time (certainly Nadal wasn't the finished article until 2008 even though he scored many wins against Fed before then). If you take the current top 2 guys, they both have had very hectic schedules and lots of matches to capture the number 1 spot.

Once they do that, they need to keep the momentum going for a while and this is where the problems for Nadal come in. He simply played too many matches, and something has to give if he wants to have a chance at the slams. Same for Djoko at Cinci this year, he's looking at the bigger picture and the US Open, knowing that too much energy used will seriously harm his chances of winning.

As well as being a freak of nature, Federer has also been either lucky with injuries, or kept himself in great condition, but probably a mixture of the two. Nobody can doubt also that his effortless style of play has contributed to his longevity in the game.

If Federer remains injury free I think he should continue to play as many tournaments for as long as possible then just retire. If he cuts down on his scheduling I think this will accelerate his retirement as he will lose match fitness and remain "out of the loop" for longer periods.
 
#44
Retiring even before the match starts could seem more cowardly. I am favorable to retirement anyway. Better retiring than being bugged by injuries for weeks on end or complaining about fatigue and back for years on end. Man, I would take a few retirements over that constant whining we got from Fed month after month over mono recovering and back pain.
Way to go. This qualifies as a true failpost.

1) How is retirement in a match better than withdrawing before the tournament? If you know something's bothering you, just withdraw and give some other player a chance to play. The only excuse for a retirement is a fluke injury caught DURING the match, other than that you're just plain stupid to compete when not fit and greedy.

2) What utter bul***it, Federer never "whined month after month" about mono and back pain, he only mentioned it after Australia and said would be fit for the clay court season (which of course wasn't true as you can't cure this sort of sickness in a couple of days). Look at your hero who retires every second match and still think somes of you still believe in every paethetic excuse he makes up.
 
#45
Because he's a freak of nature ;). And I think in his prime his scheduling has been better, which was made easier due to nobody challenging the number 1 spot for some time (certainly Nadal wasn't the finished article until 2008 even though he scored many wins against Fed before then). If you take the current top 2 guys, they both have had very hectic schedules and lots of matches to capture the number 1 spot.
I don't remember Nadal being THAT much better on hard courts in 2008 compared to 2007, he was still godlike on clay and great on grass courts. The only reason Nadal went to no 1 in 2008 was because Federer's hard court points dropped. If he kept scoring in every HC tournament as he did in 2004-2007 Nadal wouldn't sniff no 1.
 
1

15_ounce

Guest
#48
Andy Murray

20/2007 ATP Hamburg (GER) Clay Filippo Volandri Andy Murray 1-5 ret. First
40/2005 CH Mons (BEL) I_Hard Xavier Malisse Andy Murray 7-5 1-0 ret. 1/4
22/2004 CH Surbiton (GBR) Grass Yeu-Tzuoo Wang Andy Murray 3-2 ret. First
 
1

15_ounce

Guest
#49
David Ferrer

32/2009 ATP Montreal (CAN) Hard Rafael Nadal David Ferrer 4-3 ret. Second
15/2006 ATP Valencia (ESP) Clay Thierry Ascione David Ferrer 7-6(1) ret. First
7/2005 ATP Costa do Sauipe (BRA) Clay Alex Corretja David Ferrer 0-6 7-5 ret. First
6/2005 ATP Buenos Aires (ARG) Clay Alberto Martin David Ferrer 5-0 ret. First
 
1

15_ounce

Guest
#50
Robin Söderling

13/2008 ATP Miami (USA) Hard Roger Federer Robin Soderling 6-4 3-0 ret. Third
32/2007 ATP Montreal (CAN) Hard Marat Safin Robin Soderling 1-2 ret. First
22/2007 ATP French Open (FRA) Clay Albert Montanes Robin Soderling 7-6(4) 4-1 ret. First
16/2006 ATP Monte Carlo (MON) Clay Fernando Gonzalez Robin Soderling 6-2 3-1 ret. Third
32/2005 ATP Montreal (CAN) Hard Olivier Rochus Robin Soderling 6-2 6-7(2) 5-2 ret. Second
3/2005 ATP Australian Open (AUS) Hard Dominik Hrbaty Robin Soderling 6-4 6-2 1-0 ret. First
 
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