Top players' match retirement history

1

15_ounce

Guest
#51
Mardy Fish

12/2010 ATP Miami (USA) Hard Mikhail Youzhny Mardy Fish 6-1 1-0 ret. Fourth
24/2008 ATP London (GBR) Grass Andy Roddick Mardy Fish 7-6(5) ret. Third
30/2007 ATP Indianapolis (USA) Hard Igor Kunitsyn Mardy Fish 6-4 ret. Second
26/2006 ATP Wimbledon (GBR) Grass Irakli Labadze Mardy Fish 6-2 ret. Third
29/2005 ATP Indianapolis (USA) Hard George Bastl Mardy Fish 1-2 ret. Third
31/2004 ATP Cincinnati (USA) Hard Andre Agassi Mardy Fish 4-6 7-6(3) 2-1 ret. First
 
1

15_ounce

Guest
#52
Tomas Berdych

33/2011 ATP Cincinnati (USA) Hard Novak Djokovic Tomas Berdych 7-5 ret. 1/2
8/2011 ATP Dubai (UAE) Hard Novak Djokovic Tomas Berdych 6-7(5) 6-2 4-2 ret. 1/2
19/2009 ATP Madrid (ESP) Clay Juan Martin Del Potro Tomas Berdych 6-2 4-1 ret. Second
15/2008 ATP Davis Cup, RUS-CZE 3-2 (RUS) Clay Nikolay Davydenko Tomas Berdych 6-3 2-6 6-7(5) 6-3 1-2 ret. Rubber 4
35/2007 ATP U.S. Open (USA) Hard Andy Roddick Tomas Berdych 7-6(6) 2-0 ret. Fourth
23/2006 CH Prostejov (CZE) Clay Jan Hajek Tomas Berdych 1-6 5-1 ret. Second
12/2005 ATP Miami (USA) Hard Arnaud Clement Tomas Berdych 6-3 3-0 ret. First
 
1

15_ounce

Guest
#53
Jo-Wilfried Tsonga

32/2011 ATP Montreal (CAN) Hard Novak Djokovic Jo-Wilfried Tsonga 6-4 3-0 ret. 1/2
21/2010 ATP French Open (FRA) Clay Mikhail Youzhny Jo-Wilfried Tsonga 6-2 ret. Fourth
19/2010 ATP Madrid (ESP) Clay Guillermo Garcia-Lopez Jo-Wilfried Tsonga 6-2 ret. Second
9/2010 ATP Davis Cup, FRA-GER, 4-1 (FRA) I_Hard Simon Greul Jo-Wilfried Tsonga 4-6 6-2 1-0 ret. Rubber 4
44/2009 ATP Valencia (ESP) I_Hard Mikhail Youzhny Jo-Wilfried Tsonga 6-7(3) 6-0 3-0 ret. First
40/2008 ATP Tokyo (JPN) Hard Viktor Troicki Jo-Wilfried Tsonga 5-7 2-1 ret. Third
26/2005 CH Cordoba (ESP) Hard Gilles Muller Jo-Wilfried Tsonga 7-6(3) ret. First
14/2005 CH Tallahassee (USA) Hard Frederic Niemeyer Jo-Wilfried Tsonga 6-2 1-0 ret. Second
41/2004 CH Tiburon (USA) Hard Ladislav Svarc Jo-Wilfried Tsonga 7-6(5) 3-3 ret. First
 

Emet74

Professional
#54
PRECISELY BECAUSE HE DIDN'T PLAY ALL OF THEM, HE WAS FRESHER FOR THE ONES HE PLAYED. Fed's level in masters started dropping in 2007 and that's precisely when he had to play at least 8 every year.
Yes but I don't think that's related. He's played IW/Miami every single year, and in 2007 lost to Canas back to back there; that's nothing to do w/ the schedule. In fact he hasn't reached an IW or Miami final since 2006 and those are the first two masters of the year.

Although masters are mandatory now players can still withdraw w/ injury, even not so serious injury, like Nadal in Paris last year. I see no reason why Djoko couldn't have withdrawn from Cincy w/ the shoulder problem and he probably should have.
 

Emet74

Professional
#55
Fed also competes well even when struggling physically. At both the 2005 AO semi w/ Safin and 2008 TMC match w/ Murray he was in alot of pain but still played his opponant close.

2005 TMC match against Nalbandian most other players would have retired after he went down 2-6, 1-6, 0-4 in sets 3-5 before making a comeback. He was recently off crutches and his legs were so tired he couldn't feel them, but just kept playing anyway and eventually got a second wind.
 

Colin

Professional
#56
Retiring even before the match starts could seem more cowardly. I am favorable to retirement anyway. Better retiring than being bugged by injuries for weeks on end or complaining about fatigue and back for years on end. Man, I would take a few retirements over that constant whining we got from Fed month after month over mono recovering and back pain.
Seeing as you have managed to mount an indefatigable case, however intellectually daft, assailing a player for never retiring in a tennis match while conversely lauding the superiority of quitting, I must applaud you and wonder: Have you ever considered providing PR for multinational corporations or certain political parties? You seem to have a preternatural gift for taking the most untenable arguments imaginable and steadfastly defending them, straight-faced, despite the crushing impediments of logic and ridicule mounted in opposition.

The key is that your intransigence is genuine, a pure reflection of a fervid, unruminated devotion, like a cigarette manufacturer who's not merely an apologist but a chain-smoking true believer in his product's health benefits; a big oil executive who knows that fossil fuels will save the earth.

Some flights of absurdity on which you've proudly taken passenger could even challenge Baghdad Bob at his 2003 Iraq-invasion best, rhapsodizing over the immutability of Saddam's rule and the imminent defeat of U.S. forces. Here, in this universe you tend, unparalleled champions are bums who don't have the good sense to bow out of a winning match; knees are amaranthine, shoulders shatterproof on the bodies of the blessed; and grand slam hopes spring eternal where the clay is as dirty as the time-killing tactics and the grass is always green and high-bouncing. Tell yourself a story enough and it becomes true.
 
1

15_ounce

Guest
#57
Seeing as you have managed to mount an indefatigable case, however intellectually daft, assailing a player for never retiring in a tennis match while conversely lauding the superiority of quitting, I must applaud you and wonder: Have you ever considered providing PR for multinational corporations or certain political parties? You seem to have a preternatural gift for taking the most untenable arguments imaginable and steadfastly defending them, straight-faced, despite the crushing impediments of logic and ridicule mounted in opposition.

The key is that your intransigence is genuine, a pure reflection of a fervid, unruminated devotion, like a cigarette manufacturer who's not merely an apologist but a chain-smoking true believer in his product's health benefits; a big oil executive who knows that fossil fuels will save the earth.

Some flights of absurdity on which you've proudly taken passenger could even challenge Baghdad Bob at his 2003 Iraq-invasion best, rhapsodizing over the immutability of Saddam's rule and the imminent defeat of U.S. forces. Here, in this universe you tend, unparalleled champions are bums who don't have the good sense to bow out of a winning match; knees are amaranthine, shoulders shatterproof on the bodies of the blessed; and grand slam hopes spring eternal where the clay is as dirty as the time-killing tactics and the grass is always green and high-bouncing. Tell yourself a story enough and it becomes true.
:mrgreen: my favourite post of the day :mrgreen:
 
#59
Murray has seemingly retired pretty rarely, more often just walk-overs if he has pulled out. Potentially quite admirable that he sticks it out, along with the fact of his split knee and being relatively unlucky/injury prone.

Just a thought
 

danb

Professional
#63
No, he's never retired in a match.
I can't say I am a Federer fan but he is real. He got his arse kicked a few times but he took one in the chin like a man (even if a few times he cried like a girl).
In my opinion that's waaaaaaaaay better than being afraid to take one. I am so disappointed with Joker; when I thought he got his **** together he quits again.
Fudge and candies. Had he lost 0 and 1 I would haved said "well something was wrong but he still played - ok".
And I was waiting USO rooting for him. Not anymore.
Now I am rooting for Murray. Better a chocker than a quitter.
 
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#64
Murray has seemingly retired pretty rarely, more often just walk-overs if he has pulled out. Potentially quite admirable that he sticks it out, along with the fact of his split knee and being relatively unlucky/injury prone.

Just a thought
That's true, Murray and Federer certainly stick it out to the end. The only exceptions I can remember for Murray was against Malisse 6 years ago when he first came on the tour and had a right leg injury and jetlag, and the one against Volandri where he was playing great, but popped his wrist that put him out of the French Open and Wimbledon.
 
#65
I honestly don't get how this thread contains so many posts about Federer, the guy never retired in a match, there's simply no retirement history in his case.
Yet one more record of Federer's which will probably never be broken. :)

How many other players will ever play over 1000 matches in their career without a single retirement? :shock:
 
#66
Federer withdrew from a lot of masters before they were mandatory (he even withdrew from Paris after starting playing it once, not that different from retiring). He preserved himself by limiting his playing. Smart enough but not an option for Nadal and Djoko now that masters are mandatory. Of course before mid-2003, he preserved himself by sucking at tennis and rarely making it past early rounds guaranteeing minimum wearout until almost 22. Nadal wasn't that lucky since at 18/19 he was winning masters and slams... and continued doing so. Not everybody can play mediocre tennis for their first 4 years on the tour. Some players are just too talented for that.

haha... withdrawing is not "that different" from retiring. In other worlds, Veroniq is saying if you dont start it same as you start and quit when you are sure you cant win.
If thats the case, then please add some more quitting to Nadals history, Like in the clay season when he pulled out from Barcelona because his body told him he needs rest.
 

ViscaB

Hall of Fame
#68
I don't think Djojovic' and Nadal's retirements are that outrageous. These two players played much more matches than any other (bar Federer) in the last years. It makes sense for them 1) to have a bigger chance of injuries. 2) on top of that it's logical the more matches you play the larger the chance of a retirement.
 
#69
Yet one more record of Federer's which will probably never be broken. :)

How many other players will ever play over 1000 matches in their career without a single retirement? :shock:
He better not retire once before his career is over. That'd be one heck of a record. But one ankle twist and BOOM there goes the milestone!
 

Benhur

Hall of Fame
#71
I don't think Djojovic' and Nadal's retirements are that outrageous.
They aren't. It's only that they have more visibility. Going through the yearly ATP match record for both, you see Djokovic has 11 retirements out of a total of 488 matches (1 every 44 matches on average, or about 1.37 times per year). Nadal has 7 out of 636 (1 every 91 matches, or 0.77 times per year).

In both cases, you see that the number of times they've had opponents retire to them is much, much larger. More than twice as large, I would say, though I haven't counted them.
 
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Big_Dangerous

Talk Tennis Guru
#74
I'm not saying Fed didn't catch up later (resultwise) but in terms of wearout, it still makes a big difference.
I realize this post is a few years old, but I would disagree with this. When you're younger you should have more energy and your body recovers faster, so you should be able to play more and longer matches at a younger age. Federer having his success later and never retiring in a match or missing a major is all the more impressive.
 
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#75
Retiring even before the match starts could seem more cowardly. I am favorable to retirement anyway. Better retiring than being bugged by injuries for weeks on end or complaining about fatigue and back for years on end. Man, I would take a few retirements over that constant whining we got from Fed month after month over mono recovering and back pain.
Seeing as you have managed to mount an indefatigable case, however intellectually daft, assailing a player for never retiring in a tennis match while conversely lauding the superiority of quitting, I must applaud you and wonder: Have you ever considered providing PR for multinational corporations or certain political parties? You seem to have a preternatural gift for taking the most untenable arguments imaginable and steadfastly defending them, straight-faced, despite the crushing impediments of logic and ridicule mounted in opposition.

The key is that your intransigence is genuine, a pure reflection of a fervid, unruminated devotion, like a cigarette manufacturer who's not merely an apologist but a chain-smoking true believer in his product's health benefits; a big oil executive who knows that fossil fuels will save the earth.

Some flights of absurdity on which you've proudly taken passenger could even challenge Baghdad Bob at his 2003 Iraq-invasion best, rhapsodizing over the immutability of Saddam's rule and the imminent defeat of U.S. forces. Here, in this universe you tend, unparalleled champions are bums who don't have the good sense to bow out of a winning match; knees are amaranthine, shoulders shatterproof on the bodies of the blessed; and grand slam hopes spring eternal where the clay is as dirty as the time-killing tactics and the grass is always green and high-bouncing. Tell yourself a story enough and it becomes true.

i only read this now... i know i'm 3 years late, but this is a gem ! :D
 
#77
Hey OP - reviving this thread. You should add Djokovic's retirement today in the Wimbledon QF. Was down 7-6, 2-0 against Berdych when he had an elbow flareup. Also the 2016 Dubai QF against Lopez after he lost the first set 6-3 (eye infection that flared up during the match).

There should be more in the 2010-2016 timeframe...
 
#78
Hey OP - reviving this thread. You should add Djokovic's retirement today in the Wimbledon QF. Was down 7-6, 2-0 against Berdych when he had an elbow flareup. Also the 2016 Dubai QF against Lopez after he lost the first set 6-3 (eye infection that flared up during the match).

There should be more in the 2010-2016 timeframe...
I think back when this list started it was poking a bit at his perceived softness...however, I think these recent ones are real and actually serious. Elbow injury, eye infection. Different from a bellyache.
 
#80
Hey OP - reviving this thread. You should add Djokovic's retirement today in the Wimbledon QF. Was down 7-6, 2-0 against Berdych when he had an elbow flareup. Also the 2016 Dubai QF against Lopez after he lost the first set 6-3 (eye infection that flared up during the match).

There should be more in the 2010-2016 timeframe...
3 retirements vs Berdych, isn't it (sorry if someone mentioned this before)?
 
#81
Seeing as you have managed to mount an indefatigable case, however intellectually daft, assailing a player for never retiring in a tennis match while conversely lauding the superiority of quitting, I must applaud you and wonder: Have you ever considered providing PR for multinational corporations or certain political parties? You seem to have a preternatural gift for taking the most untenable arguments imaginable and steadfastly defending them, straight-faced, despite the crushing impediments of logic and ridicule mounted in opposition.

The key is that your intransigence is genuine, a pure reflection of a fervid, unruminated devotion, like a cigarette manufacturer who's not merely an apologist but a chain-smoking true believer in his product's health benefits; a big oil executive who knows that fossil fuels will save the earth.

Some flights of absurdity on which you've proudly taken passenger could even challenge Baghdad Bob at his 2003 Iraq-invasion best, rhapsodizing over the immutability of Saddam's rule and the imminent defeat of U.S. forces. Here, in this universe you tend, unparalleled champions are bums who don't have the good sense to bow out of a winning match; knees are amaranthine, shoulders shatterproof on the bodies of the blessed; and grand slam hopes spring eternal where the clay is as dirty as the time-killing tactics and the grass is always green and high-bouncing. Tell yourself a story enough and it becomes true.
What a pile of pompous crap post.
 
#82
Retiring even before the match starts could seem more cowardly. I am favorable to retirement anyway. Better retiring than being bugged by injuries for weeks on end or complaining about fatigue and back for years on end. Man, I would take a few retirements over that constant whining we got from Fed month after month over mono recovering and back pain.
Seeing as you have managed to mount an indefatigable case, however intellectually daft, assailing a player for never retiring in a tennis match while conversely lauding the superiority of quitting, I must applaud you and wonder: Have you ever considered providing PR for multinational corporations or certain political parties? You seem to have a preternatural gift for taking the most untenable arguments imaginable and steadfastly defending them, straight-faced, despite the crushing impediments of logic and ridicule mounted in opposition.

The key is that your intransigence is genuine, a pure reflection of a fervid, unruminated devotion, like a cigarette manufacturer who's not merely an apologist but a chain-smoking true believer in his product's health benefits; a big oil executive who knows that fossil fuels will save the earth.

Some flights of absurdity on which you've proudly taken passenger could even challenge Baghdad Bob at his 2003 Iraq-invasion best, rhapsodizing over the immutability of Saddam's rule and the imminent defeat of U.S. forces. Here, in this universe you tend, unparalleled champions are bums who don't have the good sense to bow out of a winning match; knees are amaranthine, shoulders shatterproof on the bodies of the blessed; and grand slam hopes spring eternal where the clay is as dirty as the time-killing tactics and the grass is always green and high-bouncing. Tell yourself a story enough and it becomes true.
i never get tired of this magnificent post :)
 
#83
Hey OP - reviving this thread. You should add Djokovic's retirement today in the Wimbledon QF. Was down 7-6, 2-0 against Berdych when he had an elbow flareup. Also the 2016 Dubai QF against Lopez after he lost the first set 6-3 (eye infection that flared up during the match).

There should be more in the 2010-2016 timeframe...
There is only one more: 2011 DC vs del Potro; was down 6-7 0-3
 

Sentinel

Bionic Poster
#84
Seeing as you have managed to mount an indefatigable case, however intellectually daft, assailing a player for never retiring in a tennis match while conversely lauding the superiority of quitting, I must applaud you and wonder: Have you ever considered providing PR for multinational corporations or certain political parties? You seem to have a preternatural gift for taking the most untenable arguments imaginable and steadfastly defending them, straight-faced, despite the crushing impediments of logic and ridicule mounted in opposition.

The key is that your intransigence is genuine, a pure reflection of a fervid, unruminated devotion, like a cigarette manufacturer who's not merely an apologist but a chain-smoking true believer in his product's health benefits; a big oil executive who knows that fossil fuels will save the earth.

Some flights of absurdity on which you've proudly taken passenger could even challenge Baghdad Bob at his 2003 Iraq-invasion best, rhapsodizing over the immutability of Saddam's rule and the imminent defeat of U.S. forces. Here, in this universe you tend, unparalleled champions are bums who don't have the good sense to bow out of a winning match; knees are amaranthine, shoulders shatterproof on the bodies of the blessed; and grand slam hopes spring eternal where the clay is as dirty as the time-killing tactics and the grass is always green and high-bouncing. Tell yourself a story enough and it becomes true.
Excellent reply, good Sir. @vive le beau jeu ! thanks for pointing out.
At the same time, sorry for Djokovic. Hope he gets well soon.
 
#85
This is where I chime in that if Djoker retires in NY he will complete the Grand Slam. Albeit not a calander Grand Slam but nevertheless very impressive.
 

Colin

Professional
#96
i never get tired of this magnificent post :)
What's strange is that I was just Googling Djokovic's retirement history to see if he had finally achieved the esteemed Career Retirement Slam and it brought me to this thread. I opened it, noting that it was from 2011, then started scrolling through and realized that I had posted in it back in the day. I was rather harsh with Veroniquem, wasn't I? Not that she didn't totally deserve it, of course, but maybe I had run out of wine or Rogi had a particularly poor day with his winner-to-error ratio, because I seemed a bit aggrieved. Or perhaps I just need to retire to my pillow-top mattress to dream GOAT dreams.

Speaking of retirements, I found out that sadly Djokovic today had not achieved the coveted Career Retirement Slam despite having long suffered the indignity of "Bird flu, anthrax, SARS, common cough and cold," as Andy Roddick has pointed out. But, as a positive, Djokovic — who, interestingly enough, retired from the match at a set and two games down just like the widely disparaged Klizan did to open Nole's tournament — has a great chance to achieve that distinction this year at the U.S. Open.

Rumor has it that Pepe has actually been coaching Djokovic toward that goal since last year's U.S. open when the Serb foolishly decided to complete his defeat against Stan Wawrinka. He could have pulled the rip-cord in set 4 as even TTW knew where that was headed, but he lacked the foresight. He can correct that in August. Let's face it — it's the only notable thing he can do in a grand slam this year.

One also has to point out that if Djokovic doesn't act, Rafa could jump in and take the initiative for himself, getting a U.S. Open retirement to go with his Aussie Open, a hard-court double. After all of the hot-plane calamities, banana imbroglios, low-door indiscretions, bread-knife misfortune, misaligned water-bottle tribulations and dangerous dalliances with chairs, it must be said that Nadal has under-achieved on the retirement front. He could be at 18 slam retirements with such an estimable enumeration of woe. The head-to-head with Federer here is, as you'd expect, unassailable, but he has some ground to make up with Novak. I think this summer hard-court season the time is ripe for Rafa (banana pun intended). Surely Veroniquem and I can agree on that.
 
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