Trying to save money by stringing

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
#52
Than I'm gonna give it a try. Seller states in the add that it's perfectly functional. Gonna go there with my stick to see if it fits in.

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String your racket while you’re there. Ask first though before you go, the seller may not have time for you to string a racket while you’re there. It could easily take you over an hour or two to do that. Take your own string.
 
#53
String your racket while you’re there. Ask first though before you go, the seller may not have time for you to string a racket while you’re there. It could easily take you over an hour or two to do that. Take your own string.
Well...I've never strung a racquet before...I can't start learning at strangers house

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Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
#54
Well...I've never strung a racquet before...I can't start learning at strangers house

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You can if he will let you. Ask or ask him to show you how your racket is strung. All he can say is yes or no. You’re assuming he’ll say no and you’re automatically limiting your options. Would you buy a car without test driving it?

EDIT: When I learned to ski the first thing I did was take a lesson. Best $50 I ever spent, it included lift tickets, equipment and lesson for the day. The equipment and lift ticket cost more than that but I was limited to green slopes which is all I needed. Stringing your own racket with someone who knows the machine will really shoeten the learning curve.
 
#56
Well...I've never strung a racquet before...I can't start learning at strangers house

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Back in 1968 when I first started stringing, the machine I purchased then , the seller spent some time with me to teach me the basics of stringing, the day I went to his house to pick it up.That was part of the agreement we had at that time.
I never strung a racquet up to that point.point is you can start learning from the seller, that is if he follows protocols and know proper technique, as some stringers take bad short cuts and string poorly.The old timer that taught me was well known stringer in area and strung for a long long time.
 
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Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
#57
Back in 1968 when I first started stringing, the machine I purchased then , the seller spend some time with me to teach me the basics of stringing, the day I went to his house to pick it up.That was part of the agreement we had at that time.
I never strung a racquet up to that point.point is you can start learning from the seller, that is if he follows protocols and know proper technique, as some stringers take bad short cuts and string poorly.The old timer that taught me was well known stringer in area and strung for a long long time.
I would agrue even a bad stringer is better than nothing. At least you’re familiarizing yourself with the tools. The problem is bad habits are hard to break. Another option is to go to the USRSA website and find a qualified instructor https://www.racquettech.com/stringing/instructor_search.php
 

Traffic

Hall of Fame
#59
For that price, if it will hold your racquet securely and the clamps hold, and the lock-out tension works (I've never used a lock-out tensioner), seems like it would be great. Even if it is not calibrated, you can check your finished tension with Racquet Tune and then have a baseline to adjust your next stringing to.
 

Traffic

Hall of Fame
#60
BTW, I recently showed my coworker how to string using his new Gamma. It's a 6pt with flying clamps and DW. Stringing with flying clamps was not as bad as I thought. It took me an hour to string. That's with pre-stretching gut and multi, stringing gut in the mains, providing instructions, allowing student to trying a few mains. So not bad.
 
#61
If I have it right, seller is asking the equivalent of $56 US. At that price I would not be expecting the seller to wine and dine me in addition to the machine. Personally, I wouldn't want an Eagnas, but if Eagnas is acceptable to @MilanA, hand over the money, grab the machine and go.
 
#62
A fixed clamp, 6 points dropweight can be had for well less than $200 and will be more accurate and easier to learn on than a cheap $200, 2 points with flying clamps. I could be wrong.
Look for a used DW with fixed clamps. There should be around. Some more affluent players try it out and don't want to mess with a drop weight and then sell it off in new condition.
So, I think I'm looking for a used DW with fixed clamps and 6 mounting points for a first machine. I love to tinker, I'm handy, I'm playing a lot these days, and I'm ready to do my own stringing. Could any of you please suggest what makes/models I should be looking for? Thanks!
 

Traffic

Hall of Fame
#63
Well, the first place to look for is Craigslist. I think I actually saw some lock-out crank machines for very reasonable price.

I had an opportunity to pick up a DW machine from a club mate, but I already had one. If you belong to a club, you can put the feelers out.

Be patient. They are out there.

Names like Gamma, Alpha, Neos,
 
#64
To add to Traffic's post, I found a 6 point, fixed clamp DW machine (Gamma) used for just over $200. I had a basic flying clamp DW machine I bought previously for $100 and sold for $90. Net/net I got the new fixed clamp machine for about $100. It is older, but everything was in good shape (just a bit dirty/dusty). I cleaned it up and it has been pretty problem free while I come up to speed with a slightly different skill set to use it appropriately.
 
#65
Well, the first place to look for is Craigslist. I think I actually saw some lock-out crank machines for very reasonable price.

I had an opportunity to pick up a DW machine from a club mate, but I already had one. If you belong to a club, you can put the feelers out.

Be patient. They are out there.

Names like Gamma, Alpha, Neos,
To add to Traffic's post, I found a 6 point, fixed clamp DW machine (Gamma) used for just over $200. I had a basic flying clamp DW machine I bought previously for $100 and sold for $90. Net/net I got the new fixed clamp machine for about $100. It is older, but everything was in good shape (just a bit dirty/dusty). I cleaned it up and it has been pretty problem free while I come up to speed with a slightly different skill set to use it appropriately.
Thanks for the guidance, @krisdrum and @Traffic!

I'll see what pops up in the Chicago/******* area used. But I'd also like to be ready to pounce when the right one comes. I just don't know what the right one should be!

The machines I've found that look interesting to me so far are:

Gamma Progression II 602, either new or one used on **** for $250 with a shoulder V-clamp missing
Gamma X-Stringer, one on **** with 6 claps and DW for $350
Alpha Pioneer DC Plus, new at $530, haven't found any used

The Alpha Pioneer DC Plus looks like it might be better quality than these two Gammas, but it's twice the price of a needs-repair X-Stringer I came across today. And, I'm wondering what your thoughts are about whether it's worth trying to find a used, but surely much more expensive, constant pull machine like a Stringway ML100-T92 or 120-T92.

I'm not sure what other machines are constant pull, or if it makes a great deal of difference. I do like consistency, I geek out on it actually, and will be stringing mostly poly and poly-multi hybrids.

I'll be asking around at my new club and see who is stringing and all.

Thanks for your thoughts!
 

Traffic

Hall of Fame
#66
I'm not sure what other machines are constant pull, or if it makes a great deal of difference. I do like consistency, I geek out on it actually, and will be stringing mostly poly and poly-multi hybrids.
Ha! I do have thoughts on the consistency of a "Constant Pull" DW machine. Do not be fooled thinking Constant Pull = Consistent.
Think of it this way. If you hold tension on a CP machine for 5sec vs 25sec and then clamp off, is the tension the same? The answer is yes. However, the latter and former have different durations of stretching. So your end results are different.

It is very important on a DW machine to hold the time it takes for you to start tensioning and then clamping the string. Say 8sec. with a single or double iteration of tension. EVERY TIME. With an electric CP tensioner, this is easy to do. With a DW, it takes a lot of practice.

However, a lock-out machine can produce repeatable tension much easier. And even if the time it takes to clamp your string varies a bit, the finished tension is going to be more consistent than with a DW machine (assuming the same level of attention to detail).

A LO machine may produce slightly lower finished tension, but it is easier to repeat. Then all you need to do is make an adjustment in your reference tension to account for a slightly lower finished tension then say on a DW machine.
 
#67
A LO machine may produce slightly lower finished tension, but it is easier to repeat. Then all you need to do is make an adjustment in your reference tension to account for a slightly lower finished tension then say on a DW machine.
Right. So, would you suggest to go with a LO rather than a DW for a quality starter machine, or a short-to-middle-term then re-sale? I'm detail-oriented so I'm pretty sure I could get consistent results with a DW, I'd start by using a timer and clamp off each at a set duration of pull. So I guess my question is why do many suggest starting with a DW machine? I'm attracted to DW for the "old-school art", but I also like idea of LO comparatively-mindless consistency.
 
#68
And, the "Automatic" in Stringway's Automatic DW means that it takes out the possibility of some user-inconsistency in the tensioning of a (manual, normal) DW, is that correct?
 
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Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
#69
And, the "Automatic" in Stringway's Automatic DW means that it takes out the possibility of some user-inconsistency in the tensioning of a (manual, normal) DW, is that correct?
Automatic means it auto adjust for stretching so the bar does not have to be level. I seen a local store (gutz and glowry) had a MS200 for $450 on Facebook. They want to sell locally though.
 

Dags

Hall of Fame
#70
So I guess my question is why do many suggest starting with a DW machine?
I think it's simply due to cost. The cheapest machines have a drop weight tensioner and flying clamps. Swap either of those factors for a crank tension head or fixed clamps, and the price tends to rise fairly steeply.
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
#71
@macguyvur most people that get into stringing to save money start looking for the cheapest new machine they can find. Looking for the lowest price is like looking for the lowest quality and the most user unfriendly. I would suggest looking for a good used machine at a good price.

EDIT: String 1 racket a week for your friends and your friends will pay for your machine and you will become a better stringer. The problems you will face and solve as you string makes you a better stringer.
 
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Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
#72
And later if you got your stringer for a good price and you want to upgrade or get completely out of stringing you should be able to recoup your initial investment. Try selling a used cheap machine for the top dollar price of a new one.
 

Traffic

Hall of Fame
#73
Right. So, would you suggest to go with a LO rather than a DW for a quality starter machine, or a short-to-middle-term then re-sale? I'm detail-oriented so I'm pretty sure I could get consistent results with a DW, I'd start by using a timer and clamp off each at a set duration of pull. So I guess my question is why do many suggest starting with a DW machine? I'm attracted to DW for the "old-school art", but I also like idea of LO comparatively-mindless consistency.
If you are a tinkerer, look for a cheap used DW with flying clamps. Learn how to get good at it. Then dump it and get a nicer one.

If I were to do it again, I would have just started with a LO crank machine.
  • Easier to hit reference tension consistently (DW can be tricky to hit reference in 1 try, 2 tries, 3 tries?)
  • Requires shorter tail to pull tension (this is an issue when I string 2-piece on 18mains)
  • Less space required (don't need space to account for the swing of the arm)
I've strung about 140 racquets now. As long as it's once a week, it's not too bad. But I definitely wouldn't mind a LO. I may look into the Wise electric tensioner. Again, resale value on DW machine is the pits.
 

jhick

Professional
#74
Bought a klippermate in 1990 for $99. Had to replace a $7 part last year. I pull out the side table in front of my recliner and string in front of the tennis tv. Thought of upgrading but prob will never have to. I would buy it again
This is me to a T. I've had my Klippermate for close to 30 years, bought it when I was still in High School (although I think I paid about $140 for it). I don't break strings nearly as often as I used to, but now my sons are playing and so I'm stringing a little more again. I've thought about buying a more expensive machine and doing some light advertising to get a little business going and my sons started stringing, but haven't bit the bullet yet.
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
#75
Automatic means it auto adjust for stretching so the bar does not have to be level. I seen a local store (gutz and glowry) had a MS200 for $450 on Facebook. They want to sell locally though.
BTW is anyone is interested that machine is an old table top Laserfibre. Seems like a high price to me but it looks to be in good shape.
 
#76
@macguyvur most people that get into stringing to save money looking for the cheapest new machine they can find. Looking for the lowest price is like looking for the lowest quality and the most user unfriendly. I would suggest looking for a good used machine at a good price.

EDIT: String 1 racket a week for your friends and your friends will pay for your machine and you will become a better stringer. The problems you will face and solve as you string makes you a better stringer.
My feeling exactly. My challenge now is to decide on what I’m looking for so I can concentrate on the used search and jump when the right one shows up.

I’m starting to feel like that I should be looking for a decent lock out machine or a stringway “automatic” constant pull DW, and not a standard drop weight.
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
#82
When I was in the USAF I went to training at Chanute (Rantoul I’ll.) One day it got down to -58 w/windchill. Then in ‘78 I was in Chicago and the temp (w/windchill) got down to -60. I spent 26 hours at O’Hare after they predicted 2-12” of lake effect snow. LOL They were about 16” off. When I got up that morning I could not see the 6” of snow on the street from the 6th floor and I knew I was in trouble.
 
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