TTW Book Club

MasterZeb

Hall of Fame
#2
I'll start off.
Just finished "What they don't teach you at Harvard Business School" by Mark H. McCormack. And I've gotta say, it definitely lives up to its credibility. A fantastic read, especially if you love business and the life around it. Very fluid and some tricky topics covered and made understandable.

Started "Outliers" by Malcolm Gladwell. Not bad so far
 
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Sentinel

Bionic Poster
#7
I'm reading "how to make enough money and develop a big enough ego to be able to tell the world to **** off and have the world think you're amazing".

It's fascinating.
Most of us here already think you are amazing. You don't need to make anything more now.
 

MasterZeb

Hall of Fame
#10
I just read "Devil in the White City" by Eric Larson. Great book about the 1893 Chicago World's Fair and serial killer. Fascinating read. Reads like a fiction book even though it is a non fiction story.
Just did a little research and looks fantastically intriguing. Definitely going to add it to my 'to read' list. I've always wondered how corrupt the human mind has to be to go around killing people, and have been interested in knowing what goes through people's minds when doing such acts. Is it a third person narrative?
 

Sentinel

Bionic Poster
#11
I'm guessing you're into the the scientific and more specifically biological scheme of things. Is is it more of a philosophical read, or scientific and factual ?
Actually, someone here recommended this book months ago.

Then my brother who was visiting bought it at the local store, so I began reading it. He also bought me the Bacteria to Bach book as a gift. I guess for me it's more of a scientific read. But this book goes into history a lot which I am not too fond of. But it's still interesting.
 
#12
I'll start off.
Just finished "What they don't teach you at Harvard Business School" by Mark H. McCormack. And I've gotta say, it definitely lives up to its credibility. A fantastic read, especially if you love business and the life around it. Very fluid and some tricky topics covered and made understandable.

Started "Outliers" by Malcolm Gladwell. Not bad so far
Before long, you'll be reading: Blink, Tipping Point, What The Dog Saw & David and Goliath. Also, you'll likely check out his many New Yorker's [archived] articles.
 

MasterZeb

Hall of Fame
#13
Before long, you'll be reading: Blink, Tipping Point, What The Dog Saw & David and Goliath. Also, you'll likely check out his many New Yorker's [archived] articles.
Not too familiar with his publishings. Is he highly credited? So far I'm liking Outliers. Very compelling.
 

Sentinel

Bionic Poster
#14
I've always wondered how corrupt the human mind has to be to go around killing people, and have been interested in knowing what goes through people's minds when doing such acts. Is it a third person narrative?
Does the mind need to be corrupt ? I thought in cases of serial killers it was childhood trauma or conditioning. Most of the cases I have read of had a lot of violence as children, usually physical abuse from the father.

Maybe they are just "dishing it back" to someone else. Or maybe they do it quite normally like we might kill a mosquito. To them it's something bad or dangerous that must be eradicated.
 

MasterZeb

Hall of Fame
#15
Does the mind need to be corrupt ? I thought in cases of serial killers it was childhood trauma or conditioning. Most of the cases I have read of had a lot of violence as children, usually physical abuse from the father.

Maybe they are just "dishing it back" to someone else. Or maybe they do it quite normally like we might kill a mosquito. To them it's something bad or dangerous that must be eradicated.
Hmmm. You could argue the second thing lead to the first. Possibly their mental state/illness is in such a state that they aren't able to fathom the extent of their actions and what killing someone actually is. Studies have shown the brain or a say depressed, person to be chemically different to that of a 'normal' person. Herbert Mullins was a serial killer who mirdered 13, and he said he heard voices telling him to commit such actions. He also had been diagnosed with Schrizophenia years earlier. So possibly their childhood experience caused their brain to be chemically different, to the point where you could say they're corrupt.

Some could be psychopathic, but some are a psychotic aswell, as was the case with Mullins. Psychopathic people know exactly what they're doing, whereas psychotic people have lost touch with reality it seems. So it seems while some do fit your example of us 'killing a mosquito' (Visionary killers) possibly some know exactly what they're doing and have a certain mission (Misson-oriented killers) and gain some satisfaction from it. Or there's such that gain sexual satisfaction, or some sort of thrill from sommitging such acts.

The Origin of the motives may be down to them having a tough childhood, but having such reasons and motives surely is the result of having a corrupt mind? No matter the reason, there's of course no justification to doing such acts.
 
#16
I just read "Devil in the White City" by Eric Larson. Great book about the 1893 Chicago World's Fair and serial killer. Fascinating read. Reads like a fiction book even though it is a non fiction story.
Does the book make reference to Vivekananda and his speech at the Parliament of Religions?
 

MasterZeb

Hall of Fame
#20
Finished Outliers. Overall it's a pretty good read. Shows how you can misinterpret how people achieve success and offers a different view. But it did seem to get a little repetitive by the end, and the conclusions made we're pretty simple. Still a good, easy read and thought provoking aswell.

Next up : "Risk: the science and politics of fear", by Dan Gardner. Picked it up today looks very intriguing.
 

MasterZeb

Hall of Fame
#21
Actually, someone here recommended this book months ago.

Then my brother who was visiting bought it at the local store, so I began reading it. He also bought me the Bacteria to Bach book as a gift. I guess for me it's more of a scientific read. But this book goes into history a lot which I am not too fond of. But it's still interesting.
Saw it at my local shop. Pretty hefty read haha. Didn't really appeal to me, but instead picked up "Homø Deus" By Harari, where it's about the future of humans rather than the past.
 

Sentinel

Bionic Poster
#22
Saw it at my local shop. Pretty hefty read haha. Didn't really appeal to me, but instead picked up "Homø Deus" By Harari, where it's about the future of humans rather than the past.
Have you read Deus ? I am quite eager to. Some people have said it is "meh". Do let me know as you are reading it ...

Regarding the hefty read, a friend of my bro told him there were two books he just had to read, one was Sapiens and the other was Bach to Bacteria.

I love science, so it's good. I hope this gets me back into reading. For the last 20 years or so, the only books I've read are scifi and computer/software related.
 
#23
Have you read Deus ? I am quite eager to. Some people have said it is "meh". Do let me know as you are reading it ...

Regarding the hefty read, a friend of my bro told him there were two books he just had to read, one was Sapiens and the other was Bach to Bacteria.

I love science, so it's good. I hope this gets me back into reading. For the last 20 years or so, the only books I've read are scifi and computer/software related.
Finally managed to finish Hømo Deus last night. Didn't get to finish it nearly as quickly as I was hoping to buy finally done now. I've gotta say though, it's incredible. Fantastically thought provoking ideas portrayed in a clear manner. Really makes you picture things from a different perspective. I'd say you've gotta follow up on Sapiens. It's more philosophical than scientific, so I don't know how you'd feel About that.
 

MasterZeb

Hall of Fame
#25
Are there any fiction books anyone could recommend? I've typically been more attracted towards philosophical and non fiction books. Fancy trying something different.
 
#27
Been reading mostly business and psychology books since. But a good book I picked up was American Psycho. Very explicit but if you’re into violence drugs and sex, I’d definitely recommend it.
 
#29
If this thread can be merged with the other one I inadvertently created, it would be great...
Here's another one that had a fair bit of activity this year.

There are numerous others, but most of them have been inactive longer.

Been reading mostly business and psychology books since. But a good book I picked up was American Psycho. Very explicit but if you’re into violence drugs and sex, I’d definitely recommend it.

Any psychology books you found to be interesting?
 
#31
That's a shame really. How can we get the mods to merge threads?
You can just ask them in the forum (or by pm), maybe tag Mikeler.

For me personally, I don't mind much whether the discussion moves to a new thread, or an old one is bumped, or whether they are merged or not. But I do realize that it's nice to not lose all of the previous discussions, at least the more recent stuff.
 
#32
Here's another one that had a fair bit of activity this year.

There are numerous others, but most of them have been inactive longer.




Any psychology books you found to be interesting?
One I particularly found to be interesting was ‘The psychology of fear and stress’ by Jeffrey Gray. Title says it all really
Thinking fast and slow by Kahneman. Really helps you understand the inner workings of your brain and your rationale.
Another one I read that’s more of a ‘self help’ book I feel was 12 rules of life Jordan Peterson. Listened to a few of his speeches and went out and bought his book. It’s quite religious based, but once I got around it, there some good points in there
What they don’t teach you at harvard
By McCormack - it’s not a psychology book in its core, but it did have a few points regarding building relationships etc that I feel can be applied in any conext.
Owning your own shadow by Robert Johnson goes into the part of you that often stays hidden from the world and your ways of expressing
 

Tennease

Hall of Fame
#33
I just bought Arthur Ashe book on Kindle. Will read it when I have the time. I don't know much about him, sounds like a humanitarian person, a bit like Mandela. I was shocked to learn how he died young from AIDS he contracted during multiple blood transfusions while recovering from heart surgeries. How very unlucky and very sad story!



https://www.amazon.com/Arthur-Ashe-Life-Raymond-Arsenault/dp/1439189048
 
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Sentinel

Bionic Poster
#35
Finally managed to finish Hømo Deus last night. Didn't get to finish it nearly as quickly as I was hoping to buy finally done now. I've gotta say though, it's incredible. Fantastically thought provoking ideas portrayed in a clear manner. Really makes you picture things from a different perspective. I'd say you've gotta follow up on Sapiens. It's more philosophical than scientific, so I don't know how you'd feel About that.
I started Deus but got bored since he went back into history. Will pick it up again.
 
#37
Finished the Norwegian Wood last night. Very good one. Read it in one go.

Reading Thirst for Love by Yukio Mishima now. I should finish this one tonight.
Wow it takes me a month to read a book these days!

Let us know how you get on with Mishima please.

I just read Stefan Zweig’s Beware of Pity, a masterpiece if I may say so.
 

Azure

Hall of Fame
#38
I have finished Mishima's book. On the whole, it was a very good book. I simply liked the fact that unlike many books, Mishima did not make his protagonist a paragon of virtue. A delicate portrayal of lust, betrayal, love and jealousy depicted in its myriad of characters. A subtle weaving of the society of its time is hard to miss too.

Can't believe that Mishima wrote it in his early 20's. A four out of five from me.
 

Azure

Hall of Fame
#39
I have begun The Age of Innocence by Edith Wharton. Supposedly her best book. All other books of hers that I have read have all been heartbreakers. This book of hers was the book that got Wharton a Pulitzer prize. The first time a woman was awarded one.
 
#41
A Little Fable

"Alas," said the mouse, "the world is growing smaller and smaller every day. At the beginning it was so big that I was afraid, I kept running and running, and I was glad when at last I saw walls far away to the right and left, but these long walls have narrowed so quickly that I am in the last chamber already, and there in the corner stands the trap that I must run into." "You only need to change your direction," said the cat, and ate it up.
– Franz Kafka
 
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