Two handed BH to One handed BH

Richboi

Rookie
Hey TT!

So I’ve asked previously if I should change my two hander to a one hander. Got a mixed number of replies, most of it being to stick to my two hand. But then I decided to give it a try ;)

Here’s a vid of me hitting a couple of ohbh. This is my second session trying it out. I play with a lot of people who are one handers so I’ve seen it a lot and I do have tendencies of that of a one hand player (slicing and drop shots) so i was like... why not.

Let me know what you guys think!
 

MajesticMoose

Hall of Fame
Looks pretty solid in terms of mechanics. Only thing I would suggest is pull your right arm even further back on the take back. Really make sure you feel that stretch on the top and back of your right shoulder.

Look at Thiem. He really pulls that arm back and gets into a nice deep stretch on the hitting arm. I like your follow through and your off hand flowing backwards. Alot of players will just leave it hang straight down after taking the hand of the throat.
 

Mountain Ghost

Semi-Pro
Looks very good for being so new.

There are times when your racquet head does not get far enough down before the forward part of the stroke ... this is when your right arm is pronating back and down. On those balls where it's not low enough ... you aren't able to hit out. The head dip near contact also hinders your ability to hit out. That said ... very nice stroke so far. ~ MG
 

Richboi

Rookie
Looks pretty solid in terms of mechanics. Only thing I would suggest is pull your right arm even further back on the take back. Really make sure you feel that stretch on the top and back of your right shoulder.

Look at Thiem. He really pulls that arm back and gets into a nice deep stretch on the hitting arm. I like your follow through and your off hand flowing backwards. Alot of players will just leave it hang straight down after taking the hand of the throat.
Thanks for the tip! I’ll keep the shoulder in mind. Same goes for the Double handed as well.
 

Richboi

Rookie
Looks very good for being so new.

There are times when your racquet head does not get far enough down before the forward part of the stroke ... this is when your right arm is pronating back and down. On those balls where it's not low enough ... you aren't able to hit out. The head dip near contact also hinders your ability to hit out. That said ... very nice stroke so far. ~ MG
Got it, will try to drop the racquet head lower. I didn’t notice my head dipping until I saw the video, wasnt sure if that was a bad thing, thanks for pointing that out.
 

WestboroChe

Hall of Fame
Damn dude. You just started and your OHBH already looks better than mine!

My only suggestion is to try and get that right foot further over. The pro who helped fix mine years ago told me I should practically be looking over my shoulder when I hit. An exaggeration I’m sure but it does help if you keep that in mind.

Just curious why you want to switch. Personally I would rather have a 2H but for some reason I always struggled with the footwork and since I was always stretching to hit wide balls anyway I was like what’s the point?
 

Richboi

Rookie
Damn dude. You just started and your OHBH already looks better than mine!

My only suggestion is to try and get that right foot further over. The pro who helped fix mine years ago told me I should practically be looking over my shoulder when I hit. An exaggeration I’m sure but it does help if you keep that in mind.

Just curious why you want to switch. Personally I would rather have a 2H but for some reason I always struggled with the footwork and since I was always stretching to hit wide balls anyway I was like what’s the point?
The 2H is definitely more reliable and less complexed but I’ve always felt like it’s forced for me. Not sure why. I felt more loose hitting the OHBH eventho I have never really practiced it.

My 2H has become more of a defensive shot lately and it’s been pretty annoying (going on and off). I’ve been told by my tennis friends that 1H might fit my game more since I love variety.

I haven’t fully decided to switch yet. Just testing it out. It’s good to have a little experience with it Atleast. Nothing to lose there haha.

And ofcourse the stroke is the most beautiful thing on earth
 
Your racket face just before impact tends to be open. Most high level backhand drives would have the racket face closed just before impact, 5-10 degrees?.

The off arm on the racket rotates the hitting arm down. It can rotate the hitting arm so that the racket shaft tilts down below horizontal. Do you have a tendency to keep the racket shaft horizontal at its lowest? Try lowering the racket head more and keeping the arm a little higher, see videos. Of course, this is also an adjustment for incoming ball height. See videos of Gasquet, Justine Henin and Wawrinka, my model backhands.

Then the hitting arm will be also higher across your body and you would get a little more racket head speed for a given uppermost body rotation speed. You get more racket head speed whenever the racket head is farther from the rotation axis. The rotation axis appears to often be through the neck/spine area.

On your take back you might try turning back farther, so that you are looking over your shoulder and when you turn the uppermost body forward the chest presses on the upper arm to accelerate your upper arm and racket forward. This uses stretched trunk muscles. Also, feel a distinct stretch in the back of the hitting shoulder on takeback. Press on the upper arm with the chest to start the forward swing. But before impact you can use shoulder muscles to move your upper arm off your chest, timing to be determined.

It looks as if your chest is pressing your upper arm. ? You should also see the upper arm and uppermost body rotate in sync to begin the forward swing. It has a feel.

Federer moves his upper arm off his chest much earlier, still a high level backhand, but I prefer the backhands of Gasquet, Justine Henin and Wawrinka.

Spine twisting for stretching trunk muscles may increase stress and be too much for many people, and all people with past back issues.

See this thread for details and videos. Read posts #1, 51 and to end. Geca has interesting comments on rotating the hitting arm down causing ISR and then giving ESR before impact possibly with a stretch shorten cycle for added top spin.
https://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/index.php?threads/one-hand-backhand-waht-force-to-start-forward-swing.462997/

The above can increase racket head speed at impact so pay attention to how well the impact is centered to reduce stress that might cause injury. One recent publication associates off center hits with Tennis Elbow injuries.
 
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WestboroChe

Hall of Fame
The 2H is definitely more reliable and less complexed but I’ve always felt like it’s forced for me. Not sure why. I felt more loose hitting the OHBH eventho I have never really practiced it.

My 2H has become more of a defensive shot lately and it’s been pretty annoying (going on and off). I’ve been told by my tennis friends that 1H might fit my game more since I love variety.

I haven’t fully decided to switch yet. Just testing it out. It’s good to have a little experience with it Atleast. Nothing to lose there haha.

And ofcourse the stroke is the most beautiful thing on earth
If nothing else it will give you a better slice BH when you’re stetched out wide.

Funny you say how the two gander has become a more defensive shot. That is also true for me too. The only time I put my second hand on the racquet for a BH is if I’m jammed or hitting a reflex volley. The second hand there helps me get the angle of the face right and helps with stability if it’s a hard shot.
 

Dragy

Hall of Fame
Your grip looks pretty much continental. Maybe half-bevel shifted to eastern. If you want to hit topspin drives it's just much easier to do with EBH grip.
 

Curiosity

Professional
.
You might want to check how these things look in your video, then check how they would feel if you do them differently:

I think your take back looks good, including the rotation and racquet lowering, some internal rotation. You do extend your hitting shoulder down and in/back moderately...but then you undo that much too early, as if you were getting your shoulder high again to hit a slice! Try keeping it down and in until your rotation is underway, extending it up naturally for acceleration as you rise into the hit.

Many of your hits are with a very open racquet face, which no doubt launched the ball very high. Add back some ESR (ext shoulder rotation) as your racquet rises to contact. That will usefully undo the intial ISR you took at the start, and will close the racquet face and add topspin...

I have a contrary opinion to some on your head tilt. It's the right thing to do if you do it for the right reason: The right reason is to activate your trapezius muscles, the top third of which run down your neck out to your shoulders (holding your head up...). That triggers the middle third of the traps, which power retraction of you shoulder blades, pulling them toward your spine and down. THAT is the point of the head tilt: Pulling the shoulder blades in pulls the shoulders back and rotates them. This is the power move for the OHBH. If you do this last bit energetically you'll get more power. It will be visible: You'll see the shoulders pulling back (which also looks like pushing your chest out).

You can tell if you're getting the traps going to power the hit by this: If you just drop your left arm to your side as you begin rotation and hitting arm extension (which incidentally enables faster rotation) then, when you flex your traps pulling your shoulders back (which forces your hitting arm up and out, which is what you want) THEN your dropped left arm (beginning with the upper arm) will automatically rise upward and back...and you can just go with that, continuing that upper arm rise with the left forearm, which will want to follow the upper arm....

Well, there. Good start for sure. Edit: And I agree that you should check your grip, re Dragy's comment.
 

Richboi

Rookie
Your racket face just before impact tends to be open. Most high level backhand drives would have the racket face closed just before impact, 5-10 degrees?.

The off arm on the racket rotates the hitting arm down. It can rotate the hitting arm so that the racket shaft tilts down below horizontal. Do you have a tendency to keep the racket shaft horizontal at its lowest? Try lowering the racket head more and keeping the arm a little higher, see videos? You can rotate the racket shaft farther down. See videos of Gasquet, Justine Henin and Wawrinka, my model backhands. Then the hitting arm will be also higher across your body and you would get a little more racket head speed for a given uppermost body rotation speed. You get more racket head speed whenever the racket head is farther from the rotation axis. The rotation axis appears to often be through the neck/spine area.

On your take back you might try turning back farther, so that you are looking over your shoulder and when you turn the uppermost body forward the chest presses on the upper arm to accelerate your upper arm and racket forward. This uses stretched trunk muscles. Also, feel a distinct stretch in the back of the hitting shoulder on takeback. Press on the upper arm with the chest to start the forward swing. But before impact you can use shoulder muscles to move your upper arm off your chest, timing to be determined.

It looks as if your chest is pressing your upper arm. You should also see the upper arm and uppermost body rotate in sync to begin the forward swing. It has a feel.

Federer moves his upper arm off his chest much earlier, still a high level backhand, but I prefer the backhands of Gasquet, Justine Henin and Wawrinka.

Spine twisting for stretching trunk muscles may increase stress and be too much for many people, and all people with past back issues.

See thread for details and videos. Read posts #1, 51 and to end. Geca has interesting comments on rotating the hitting arm down causing ISR and then giving ESR before impact.
https://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/index.php?threads/one-hand-backhand-waht-force-to-start-forward-swing.462997/

The above can increase racket head speed at impact so pay attention to how well the impact is centered to reduce stress that might cause injury. One recent publication associates off center hits with Tennis Elbow injuries.
Thanks a lot for the breakdown. I’ll look into the thread
 

Richboi

Rookie
.
You might want to check how these things look in your video, then check how they would feel if you do them differently:

I think your take back looks good, including the rotation and racquet lowering, some internal rotation. You do extend your hitting shoulder down and in/back moderately...but then you undo that much too early, as if you were getting your shoulder high again to hit a slice! Try keeping it down and in until your rotation is underway, extending it up naturally for acceleration as you rise into the hit.

Many of your hits are with a very open racquet face, which no doubt launched the ball very high. Add back some ESR (ext shoulder rotation) as your racquet rises to contact. That will usefully undo the intial ISR you took at the start, and will close the racquet face and add topspin...

I have a contrary opinion to some on your head tilt. It's the right thing to do if you do it for the right reason: The right reason is to activate your trapezius muscles, the top third of which run down your neck out to your shoulders (holding your head up...). That triggers the middle third of the traps, which power retraction of you shoulder blades, pulling them toward your spine and down. THAT is the point of the head tilt: Pulling the shoulder blades in pulls the shoulders back and rotates them. This is the power move for the OHBH. If you do this last bit energetically you'll get more power. It will be visible: You'll see the shoulders pulling back (which also looks like pushing your chest out).

You can tell if you're getting the traps going to power the hit by this: If you just drop your left arm to your side as you begin rotation and hitting arm extension (which incidentally enables faster rotation) then, when you flex your traps pulling your shoulders back (which forces your hitting arm up and out, which is what you want) THEN your dropped left arm (beginning with the upper arm) will automatically rise upward and back...and you can just go with that, continuing that upper arm rise with the left forearm, which will want to follow the upper arm....

Well, there. Good start for sure. Edit: And I agree that you should check your grip, re Dragy's comment.
I wasn’t aware of the shoulder going back up like I am going to slice. So it’s a different feel, which make sense now that I think of it.

So what exactly should I be looking for with he head tilt? Do I tilt to activate the “power” then straighten it when I follow through?
 

Richboi

Rookie
Guy pretends to ask for advice knowing what he wants to hear well ahead of time.

Everyone advises him not to do the thing.

Guy does the thing anyway.

J
I did take note and tried to stay with the 2H for a couple months more but It was just too inconsistent. So I just wanted to see how the OHBH progress would be like
 

Richboi

Rookie
Why don't you save us all some time and tell us what you want to hear?
I don’t know anything about the OHBH. I basically sorta just copied the technique from watching others and tried hitting with it. I Don’t know the breakdown of the stroke so I’m asking for advice to not develop any bad habits/note what to look for when hitting
 

WestboroChe

Hall of Fame
I’ve never really been able to hit a consistent TS BH drive. I can do it but it’s got to be just the right conditions. Slice I can do pretty much all day and against a typically 3.5 player it can be very effective. Can’t tell you how many times I’ve seen the ball turn sideways and jam someone. Another good one is if you hit a hard slice at someone at net they will frequently dump it in the net as the ball sort of slides down their string bed and comes off much lower than they were expecting.

I’d suggest watching the really good players if you want to get a better shot. Not your buddies.

I think if you are having trouble with a 2H the 1H May feel a little looser and easier. I think for a lot of men it’s actually a more natural shot but it takes some practice and arm strength to pull off.

I’d suggest watching Graf (for a slice BH) and McEnroe and Lendl if you hit your drive with a more continental grip. Obviously Fed has a beautiful one but Sampras’s was pretty good too. If you want to go more loopy watch Stan.

Experiment with different grips. Don’t get hung up on hitting with a specific grip just because “that’s what you’re supposed to do”. Just do what works. I hit all my BHs with a continental or semi eastern grip. When I try to go full eastern I just find myself brushing up too much and either dumping it in the net or sending it to the fence.
 

Richboi

Rookie
I’ve never really been able to hit a consistent TS BH drive. I can do it but it’s got to be just the right conditions. Slice I can do pretty much all day and against a typically 3.5 player it can be very effective. Can’t tell you how many times I’ve seen the ball turn sideways and jam someone. Another good one is if you hit a hard slice at someone at net they will frequently dump it in the net as the ball sort of slides down their string bed and comes off much lower than they were expecting.

I’d suggest watching the really good players if you want to get a better shot. Not your buddies.

I think if you are having trouble with a 2H the 1H May feel a little looser and easier. I think for a lot of men it’s actually a more natural shot but it takes some practice and arm strength to pull off.

I’d suggest watching Graf (for a slice BH) and McEnroe and Lendl if you hit your drive with a more continental grip. Obviously Fed has a beautiful one but Sampras’s was pretty good too. If you want to go more loopy watch Stan.

Experiment with different grips. Don’t get hung up on hitting with a specific grip just because “that’s what you’re supposed to do”. Just do what works. I hit all my BHs with a continental or semi eastern grip. When I try to go full eastern I just find myself brushing up too much and either dumping it in the net or sending it to the fence.
Yes, I love using the slice also. Which I try not to when I have a 2H because it’s not really the “norm”. I’ve only looked at Fed’s 1H to be honest (from the pro level). But I’ll check out the others that you said.

Although Feds strokes are very clean and good looking, I feel like it’s very unique to him. Not many can hit the way he does (many variables being considered) so yes, I should probably check out the other 1HBH players where I could probably relate to more.
 

Curiosity

Professional
I wasn’t aware of the shoulder going back up like I am going to slice. So it’s a different feel, which make sense now that I think of it.

So what exactly should I be looking for with he head tilt? Do I tilt to activate the “power” then straighten it when I follow through?
A little head tilt helps if done just as the final traps squeeze is needed. No, you don't have to think about straightening it until the ball is gone.

The point of the head tilt (or, for Edberg, the head tilt/turn-back) is just to mechanically assist/help trigger... your flex of your trapezius muscles. For their role in the backhand watch some good OHBH slow motion video filmed from behind the player, linked below. If your torso balance is slightly forward at the start (or at least not leaning back), which it will be, then the slight head tilt just as your hitting upper arm passes even with your leading foot.....should leave you feeling your traps coming into action...and pulling your shoulders back will launch your hitting arm forward, up, and rightward. Add a little ESR (If that's not familiar, ask) into contact to boost topspin.

If you turn your grip a bit more around to eastern backhand+, you'll have more options, such as increased sidespin, a more diagonal lift into contact.

The head tilt won't be of much use, though, if you aren't aware of the "pull your shoulders back" move in the first place. To get the importance of the thing, just do this: Stand somewhere with a racquet in your hand, BH grip, upper hitting arm at your side, forearm extended forward, racquet pointing as much leftward as your grip provides just before you'd be pivoting hard into the ball. Now, rotate the racquet/forearm to your right just using shoulder and back muscles but NOT moving your hitting upper arm from your side. That's the acceleration you can add to your swing, as those muscles are faster in action that your trunk rotators. Add a small amount of ESR directly into contact both for power and to keep the racquet face slightly closed.

Back to the Head Tilt: The traps (the top band of the three-band muscle) flexes to hold your head up, its key function. If you're slightly torso forward and tilt your head forward loosely, you'll feel the traps automatically "catch" your head...and you just run with that, generalizing it to the middle band (main...) traps. As you get the thing, a full trap squeeze becomes normal, controlled as needed. This "squeeze" retracts your shoulder blades as described above....but, relevant to the OHBH, causes your shoulders to rotate backwards (and down a bit), causes your hitting arm to move rightward and up toward the incoming ball. This is a fairly fast and powerful action. As a bonus, the non-hitting arm also gets rotated back and upward. You don't have to think about it much.

As to the relative position of the hitting shoulder back and just into forward launch, the head tilt, the traps flex (shoulders flexing back), watch the video slow mo hits ten times. Figure it out from what you've read. At about 3:04 in the slow mo some backhands appear. In the non-slow mo version of that same video (the second link) you can see what that OHBH sequence looks like at full speed beginning at: 1:30. Use the space-bar or screen-click and the , and . keys to go frame by frame on either video

There's not much more to know that can't be seen. Look (on the full TS backhands, not the light fast pop BH's) at his back and shoulders. Look again. Try it out. The thing flows directly from the initial rotation to the (somewhat optional head tilt &) and traps squeeze. If the traps are unfamiliar, Wikipedia does a decent article on them.

 

movdqa

Talk Tennis Guru
It looks great. I'd have guessed that you had been hitting 1-handed for a year or more.

I think that your arm strength makes it easier as you can definitely muscle parts of it if you have to but you have good preparation, nice footwork and picked up the form quickly.

I also like the way that you got that really low ball with a wrist adjustment - that's a strength move.

Have you considered hitting with both?
 

WestboroChe

Hall of Fame
Yes, I love using the slice also. Which I try not to when I have a 2H because it’s not really the “norm”. I’ve only looked at Fed’s 1H to be honest (from the pro level). But I’ll check out the others that you said.

Although Feds strokes are very clean and good looking, I feel like it’s very unique to him. Not many can hit the way he does (many variables being considered) so yes, I should probably check out the other 1HBH players where I could probably relate to more.
Obviously you aren’t going to replicate his shots but there are some good things to take away there. The biggest being that he consistently hits the ball way out in front of his body. If you can do that you will drive the ball with a good amount of top spin.
 

Dartagnan64

Legend
Guy pretends to ask for advice knowing what he wants to hear well ahead of time.

Everyone advises him not to do the thing.

Guy does the thing anyway.
I've been a doctor for many years and I can tell you that this fits 90% of the world. You can't make anyone believe anything they don't already want to believe, no matter how reasoned and scientifically valid your argument.

That being said, it looks like that video is already being done with a coach, so I'm not sure why he wants input from a bunch of schmo's on a tennis forum. Your paying the guy money, listen to him.
 

Cashman

Professional
He doesn't want input, he wants attention. Which is fine, but there's a lot of people spending their time composing thoughtful advice under a misapprehension that it's going to be used.
 

J011yroger

Talk Tennis Guru
He doesn't want input, he wants attention. Which is fine, but there's a lot of people spending their time composing thoughtful advice under a misapprehension that it's going to be used.
If he wants attention he can take the train out to my club and I will give him a free 1 hour private lesson, ($100 value) video it and post it on TW.

J
 

Richboi

Rookie
A little head tilt helps if done just as the final traps squeeze is needed. No, you don't have to think about straightening it until the ball is gone.

The point of the head tilt (or, for Edberg, the head tilt/turn-back) is just to mechanically assist/help trigger... your flex of your trapezius muscles. For their role in the backhand watch some good OHBH slow motion video filmed from behind the player, linked below. If your torso balance is slightly forward at the start (or at least not leaning back), which it will be, then the slight head tilt just as your hitting upper arm passes even with your leading foot.....should leave you feeling your traps coming into action...and pulling your shoulders back will launch your hitting arm forward, up, and rightward. Add a little ESR (If that's not familiar, ask) into contact to boost topspin.

If you turn your grip a bit more around to eastern backhand+, you'll have more options, such as increased sidespin, a more diagonal lift into contact.

The head tilt won't be of much use, though, if you aren't aware of the "pull your shoulders back" move in the first place. To get the importance of the thing, just do this: Stand somewhere with a racquet in your hand, BH grip, upper hitting arm at your side, forearm extended forward, racquet pointing as much leftward as your grip provides just before you'd be pivoting hard into the ball. Now, rotate the racquet/forearm to your right just using shoulder and back muscles but NOT moving your hitting upper arm from your side. That's the acceleration you can add to your swing, as those muscles are faster in action that your trunk rotators. Add a small amount of ESR directly into contact both for power and to keep the racquet face slightly closed.

Back to the Head Tilt: The traps (the top band of the three-band muscle) flexes to hold your head up, its key function. If you're slightly torso forward and tilt your head forward loosely, you'll feel the traps automatically "catch" your head...and you just run with that, generalizing it to the middle band (main...) traps. As you get the thing, a full trap squeeze becomes normal, controlled as needed. This "squeeze" retracts your shoulder blades as described above....but, relevant to the OHBH, causes your shoulders to rotate backwards (and down a bit), causes your hitting arm to move rightward and up toward the incoming ball. This is a fairly fast and powerful action. As a bonus, the non-hitting arm also gets rotated back and upward. You don't have to think about it much.

As to the relative position of the hitting shoulder back and just into forward launch, the head tilt, the traps flex (shoulders flexing back), watch the video slow mo hits ten times. Figure it out from what you've read. At about 3:04 in the slow mo some backhands appear. In the non-slow mo version of that same video (the second link) you can see what that OHBH sequence looks like at full speed beginning at: 1:30. Use the space-bar or screen-click and the , and . keys to go frame by frame on either video

There's not much more to know that can't be seen. Look (on the full TS backhands, not the light fast pop BH's) at his back and shoulders. Look again. Try it out. The thing flows directly from the initial rotation to the (somewhat optional head tilt &) and traps squeeze. If the traps are unfamiliar, Wikipedia does a decent article on them.

@Curiosity you have really opened up my mind on a different perspective when it comes to strokes now. That’s a pretty interesting breakdown you did about the traps. I appreciate it. Not too sure what the ESR is but I’ll look into that tonight.

Thank you for the links. Will focus on the frames you suggested. I’ll be heading out tomorrow morning to try it out again after all the feedback I got.
 

Richboi

Rookie
@Curiosity you have really opened up my mind on a different perspective when it comes to strokes now. That’s a pretty interesting breakdown you did about the traps. I appreciate it. Not too sure what the ESR is but I’ll look into that tonight.

Thank you for the links. Will focus on the frames you suggested. I’ll be heading out tomorrow morning to try it out again after all the feedback I got.
A little head tilt helps if done just as the final traps squeeze is needed. No, you don't have to think about straightening it until the ball is gone.

The point of the head tilt (or, for Edberg, the head tilt/turn-back) is just to mechanically assist/help trigger... your flex of your trapezius muscles. For their role in the backhand watch some good OHBH slow motion video filmed from behind the player, linked below. If your torso balance is slightly forward at the start (or at least not leaning back), which it will be, then the slight head tilt just as your hitting upper arm passes even with your leading foot.....should leave you feeling your traps coming into action...and pulling your shoulders back will launch your hitting arm forward, up, and rightward. Add a little ESR (If that's not familiar, ask) into contact to boost topspin.

If you turn your grip a bit more around to eastern backhand+, you'll have more options, such as increased sidespin, a more diagonal lift into contact.

The head tilt won't be of much use, though, if you aren't aware of the "pull your shoulders back" move in the first place. To get the importance of the thing, just do this: Stand somewhere with a racquet in your hand, BH grip, upper hitting arm at your side, forearm extended forward, racquet pointing as much leftward as your grip provides just before you'd be pivoting hard into the ball. Now, rotate the racquet/forearm to your right just using shoulder and back muscles but NOT moving your hitting upper arm from your side. That's the acceleration you can add to your swing, as those muscles are faster in action that your trunk rotators. Add a small amount of ESR directly into contact both for power and to keep the racquet face slightly closed.

Back to the Head Tilt: The traps (the top band of the three-band muscle) flexes to hold your head up, its key function. If you're slightly torso forward and tilt your head forward loosely, you'll feel the traps automatically "catch" your head...and you just run with that, generalizing it to the middle band (main...) traps. As you get the thing, a full trap squeeze becomes normal, controlled as needed. This "squeeze" retracts your shoulder blades as described above....but, relevant to the OHBH, causes your shoulders to rotate backwards (and down a bit), causes your hitting arm to move rightward and up toward the incoming ball. This is a fairly fast and powerful action. As a bonus, the non-hitting arm also gets rotated back and upward. You don't have to think about it much.

As to the relative position of the hitting shoulder back and just into forward launch, the head tilt, the traps flex (shoulders flexing back), watch the video slow mo hits ten times. Figure it out from what you've read. At about 3:04 in the slow mo some backhands appear. In the non-slow mo version of that same video (the second link) you can see what that OHBH sequence looks like at full speed beginning at: 1:30. Use the space-bar or screen-click and the , and . keys to go frame by frame on either video

There's not much more to know that can't be seen. Look (on the full TS backhands, not the light fast pop BH's) at his back and shoulders. Look again. Try it out. The thing flows directly from the initial rotation to the (somewhat optional head tilt &) and traps squeeze. If the traps are unfamiliar, Wikipedia does a decent article on them.

That being said, I’ve never really thought of the muscle groups that are being used. I just go out and play. I’d assume that the 2HBH would use the muscles from the other side of the body and more torso
 

Richboi

Rookie
It looks great. I'd have guessed that you had been hitting 1-handed for a year or more.

I think that your arm strength makes it easier as you can definitely muscle parts of it if you have to but you have good preparation, nice footwork and picked up the form quickly.

I also like the way that you got that really low ball with a wrist adjustment - that's a strength move.

Have you considered hitting with both?
Thank you. Yeah I just wanted to learn the 1H because there’s nothing really to lose. Not a bad thing to know another stroke/shot in the game. I feel as though it would still benefit me anyway.

As to hitting both, I’ve decided that I want to get to know both strokes but put my full focus on improving one of them more. Not sure which one as yet since I just started the 1H. I want to see how the progress goes first which is why I’m looking to some experienced 1H players to give their input haha. I can pick up a thing or two on things that I wouldn’t catch from just watching videos.
 

Richboi

Rookie
It's not polite or respectful of people's time to ask for advice that you aren't going to listen to.
I understand that I didn’t follow the advice on trying out the 1hbh and sticking 2hbh. But there were people that said to give it a try if it’s more natural. And I’m genuinely trying to learn the 1H here.
 

Richboi

Rookie
I've been a doctor for many years and I can tell you that this fits 90% of the world. You can't make anyone believe anything they don't already want to believe, no matter how reasoned and scientifically valid your argument.

That being said, it looks like that video is already being done with a coach, so I'm not sure why he wants input from a bunch of schmo's on a tennis forum. Your paying the guy money, listen to him.
I’m asking for advice to improve a stroke that I know nothing of (other than the “look” of it). This is different from advice on whether to switch to a 1H from 2H.

That’s a friend of mine, btw. Who has never seen me hit a 1HBH. I asked him to record it at the end of our hit because I’ve never seen what it looks like. And as you see, he decided to tell me to extend my arms more (the only tip he has given me so far).
 
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Richboi

Rookie

Curiosity

Professional
That being said, I’ve never really thought of the muscle groups that are being used. I just go out and play. I’d assume that the 2HBH would use the muscles from the other side of the body and more torso
If asked, I'd say one reason the one-hander is more difficult to acquire (RF's words...) is that there is a transition in the muscle groups used. The shift from trunk rotators, delts, and hitting arm extensors...to "addition of" the traps and shoulder rotators, is the reason why many multiple-slam winners still tilt their head just before the trap squeeze, which I assume you watched in all its glory on the links I included. That transition isn't minor. It's major. If a mechanical action can make that transition more reliable and robust, it's worth the small effort. That's why I picked a player with a junk-free stroke as an example. (Aside, it's worth knowing the key muscles used in a particular phase of a stroke. The flip side of that is learning down-the-line (online and free) which muscles are antagonists to those key muscles, if you find a stroke slowing down over the months.
 

movdqa

Talk Tennis Guru
If asked, I'd say one reason the one-hander is more difficult to acquire (RF's words...) is that there is a transition in the muscle groups used. The shift from trunk rotators, delts, and hitting arm extensors...to "addition of" the traps and shoulder rotators, is the reason why many multiple-slam winners still tilt their head just before the trap squeeze, which I assume you watched in all its glory on the links I included. That transition isn't minor. It's major. If a mechanical action can make that transition more reliable and robust, it's worth the small effort. That's why I picked a player with a junk-free stroke as an example. (Aside, it's worth knowing the key muscles used in a particular phase of a stroke. The flip side of that is learning down-the-line (online and free) which muscles are antagonists to those key muscles, if you find a stroke slowing down over the months.
I learned the one-hander as a teenager when it was the only thing used. I just hit the ball as hard as I could (probably annoying for the people that I hit with but I had a backboard for practice). The racquets back then were very low-powered though so a lot of those balls stayed in the court. There are times when I think that there are advantages to not knowing orthodoxy in strokes. Sure, you may have to fix problems later on but you don't get hobbled by thinking about a lot of things and trying to time them.
 

wings56

Hall of Fame
Unfortunately I don’t have any videos of me hitting consecutive 2HBH’s, but I do have a video I have posted here before:

https://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/index.php?threads/update-on-my-game.643484/#post-13345058

It’s the first post. Look at the first video since it’s the most recent. Between 5:00-7:00 I hit a few 2 handers. Sorry for the trouble but that’s all I have for now.
I see why you wanted to change... Doesn't look very natural for you to hit. I'm guessing you don't come over it much in matches except on returns and passing shots?
 

ChaelAZ

Legend
Hey TT!

So I’ve asked previously if I should change my two hander to a one hander. Got a mixed number of replies, most of it being to stick to my two hand. But then I decided to give it a try ;)

Here’s a vid of me hitting a couple of ohbh. This is my second session trying it out. I play with a lot of people who are one handers so I’ve seen it a lot and I do have tendencies of that of a one hand player (slicing and drop shots) so i was like... why not.

Let me know what you guys think!

Not bad.
 
A little head tilt helps if done just as the final traps squeeze is needed. No, you don't have to think about straightening it until the ball is gone.
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As to the relative position of the hitting shoulder back and just into forward launch, the head tilt, the traps flex (shoulders flexing back), watch the video slow mo hits ten times. Figure it out from what you've read. At about 3:04 in the slow mo some backhands appear. In the non-slow mo version of that same video (the second link) you can see what that OHBH sequence looks like at full speed beginning at: 1:30. Use the space-bar or screen-click and the , and . keys to go frame by frame on either video

There's not much more to know that can't be seen. Look (on the full TS backhands, not the light fast pop BH's) at his back and shoulders. Look again. Try it out. The thing flows directly from the initial rotation to the (somewhat optional head tilt &) and traps squeeze. If the traps are unfamiliar, Wikipedia does a decent article on them.

I am trying to locate one hand backhand frames that illustrate your discussion points. Could you be more specific on which Federer video, time and frame that has a slow motion of the head tilt, trap motions, etc. for the one hand backhand. And the part of the forward swing, start or nearing impact, etc.

Federer has a different one hand backhand technique than Wawrinka, Justine Henin and Gasquet. I'd like to see if they also have the characteristics that you mention.

Wawrinka.
 
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Curiosity

Professional
I am trying to locate one hand backhand frames that illustrate your discussion points. Could you be more specific on which Federer video, time and frame that has a slow motion of the head tilt, trap motions, etc. for the one hand backhand. And the part of the forward swing, start or nearing impact, etc.

Federer has a different one hand backhand technique than Wawrinka, Justine Henin and Gasquet. I'd like to see if they also have the characteristics that you mention.

Wawrinka.
at 11:53 and elsewhere. You can't miss them.
-full speed at 3:20 and onward. The motions are easily visible at speed once the practice pace has picked up and the T-shirt's soaked.
 
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