Two hander vs one hander for new player.

Rosstour

Hall of Fame
I have to agree with you here. I'm hitting a OHBH right now and it feels very loose and free. However, footwork and positioning is key if you want to get the most out of it. Not to mention it just feels amazing when you rip a perfect shot with it. The margin for error is way smaller than a THBH though. I've been kicking around the idea of changing up to the two-hander as I play more matches simply because it might prove more reliable in pressure situations and for rallies. Would love to hear more of your thoughts on it.
I really do not agree, I find it much easier to hit.

Positioning and footwork are key, yes, but they are also more natural and I find myself thinking less about them when I hit a 1H.

And because the shot has a much greater reach, it's less imperative to get close to the ball.

I hit them mostly in defensive situations, on the run or returning something big. When my hitting partner (5.0-5.5) hits an overhead during point play, for example, that's when I'll use 1H to just block it back.
 

mental midget

Hall of Fame
do what's fun, that's why you play tennis. no question though, the shot you see least often in rec play is a truly capable 1hbh, and lots of bad technique out there. definitely more things have to 'go right' for it to be an effective shot. wouldn't trade mine for the world though, definitely the most enjoyable shot to hit well and as a side benefit you'll likely develop a better slice.
 

BillKid

Professional
Here is the testimony of a 4.5 player, clearly not the most gifted. I will be talking of topspin and flat BH, not slice. I started playing tennis when I was maybe 9 or 10 years old. When I was around 16, I changed my 2HBH for a OHBH because I was struggling with this shot. For years I trained a lot, got lessons from coaches, and put a lot of effort on my OHBH. It took me at least 6 years before I was able to hit really properly. Not sure after how long it was better than my weak 2HBH.. Not rarely, when playing tournaments I was still choking on the backhand side.
I m now 42, still loving tennis,and working on my technique. Over the last 10 years my OHBH has improved to the point that it has become as consistent and reliable as my FH. Taking advantage of numerous helpful Youtube videos, which did not exist 20 years ago, made a huge difference. Looking back, it took me A LOT of time and efforts to develop a decent OHBH. I have no regret but it would have been probably much easier, quicker and more rewarding (at the time I was playing competitevely) to rebuild my 2HBH.
I think that for the vast majority of players, developing a solid 2HBH will be much easier than OHBH, unless the OHBH feels much more natural to them. However, there may be indirect benefits of the OHBH since it may help to become more solid on volleys and slice BH.
At my level or lower, I don't see a lot of players mastering a OHBH, wheras I see a lot of solid 2HBH. I cannot say what is the best for a young player at a higher level than mine, but I don't see a lot of OHBH in this category. That makes me think that their coaches consider the 2HBH as the best option.
 
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amlemus

Rookie
I really do not agree, I find it much easier to hit.

Positioning and footwork are key, yes, but they are also more natural and I find myself thinking less about them when I hit a 1H.

And because the shot has a much greater reach, it's less imperative to get close to the ball.

I hit them mostly in defensive situations, on the run or returning something big. When my hitting partner (5.0-5.5) hits an overhead during point play, for example, that's when I'll use 1H to just block it back.
i understand your points here. However I think the thread is speaking more to the use of the 1HBH and 2HBH in regular groundstroke situations, not as solely a defensive situation as you’ve stated. I’d agree with you that a 1HBH provides more options in defensive/return situations.
 

vex

Hall of Fame
Play how you want. It's your hobby.
^ So much this.
That said, real talk: you’re never going to be very good at hitting a one hander, almost no rec players are. A two hander is so much easier for rec players to be competent at thier offhand side of the court. It’s taught for a reason.
But again, if you fantasize nuking Wawrinka bombs... well, bombs away.
 

Chas Tennis

G.O.A.T.
You have a very good & effective looking backhand.

But you use more shoulder joint motion and less uppermost body turn for racket head speed.

This thread discusses video observations that I believe characterize the best one hand backhand technique. Federer is not included in the technique that's identified.

Read posts #1, 51 and several others to the end.
Look especially at the videos for
1) Chest press & uppermost body turn.
2) Bringing the racket down & ISR. See geca posts.
3) Thoracic Extension & Retraction (just added near end).
4)Difference of this technique and Federer's high level backhand technique.
5) The two children with one hand backhands show it.

All the high level backhands use trunk twisting between the pelvis and uppermost body. This might not be a good approach for you since your shoulder seems to drive your backhand. I aim to describe the ATP techniques and most use the 1HBH technique that I described. .
 
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BillKid

Professional
Here is a video that I like because it keeps things very simple.
At one point, the coach discusses differences with Wavrinka on one hand and Federer on the other hand, that is an interesting issue.
At the club level, Wavrinka technique may be somewhat « dangerous » to replicate, because if you rotate your trunk and open your shoulders too much, you will end up framing and missing a lot. I would rather suggest to try to copy Federer, which obviously does not mean it is the best at high level.
I would also highly recommend to take a look at Hénin BH videos. Although her grip may not be for everybody, she is a great example of how to swing and get through the ball.
 

Shroud

G.O.A.T.
I started with the 1hbh then switched to 2hbh.

Then back to the 1hbh because the 2hander was hard on my lower back and that was in my 20s. Cant imagine how a 2hander would destroy my back in my 50s. Bad elbow is preferred over a messed up back

Fwiw the so called weaknesses of high balls and return of serve can all be mitigated easily.

What is more natural will be better. Get a coach who can teach you what feels natural.
 

Wheelz

Semi-Pro
I started with the 1hbh then switched to 2hbh.

Then back to the 1hbh because the 2hander was hard on my lower back and that was in my 20s. Cant imagine how a 2hander would destroy my back in my 50s. Bad elbow is preferred over a messed up back

Fwiw the so called weaknesses of high balls and return of serve can all be mitigated easily.

What is more natural will be better. Get a coach who can teach you what feels natural.
i found an older thread because i was googling one hander on the rise last night, saw a video of you and i remember seeing other videos of your OH. You do look like a strong guy but I know a lot is in your timing, its just that you make it look easy, like other big guys I play with :)
 

Shroud

G.O.A.T.
i found an older thread because i was googling one hander on the rise last night, saw a video of you and i remember seeing other videos of your OH. You do look like a strong guy but I know a lot is in your timing, its just that you make it look easy, like other big guys I play with :)
thanks man appreciate that! Looks are definitely deceiving. Its the layers of clothes really. I am pretty weak from a strength stanpoint....

I played hours of frisbee as a kid before I played tennis so the 1 hander was super natural which is why I am saying the op should go with what is natural...
 

Moveforwardalways

Hall of Fame
It honestly doesn’t matter. For someone learning the game at retirement age, neither a one hander or a two hander is ever going to be an elite shot. Just get comfortable hitting a backhand that works for you and that you can hit it back consistently. Even if it is slice only, that’s fine. You can have a lot of fun playing 3.0 and 3.5 tennis with a one handed backhand or a even slice only backhand. Even at the pro level, you saw Thiem beat Zverev yesterday while slicing most of his backhands. If you get to the point where you are knocking on the door of 4.0 or higher, you can learn what you need to then.
 

Wheelz

Semi-Pro
I was wondering last night if smaller height players, for example me at 5'7, should aim to master the two hander? I'll assume the smaller players will get balls higher then their strike zones lore often.

I've got a 2hbh but lately played around with the ohbh so I am kind of feeling the differences. No question the 1hbh creates more power, I'd say more than forehand which is my best. But the 2hbh i feel has a bigger strike zone
 

Shroud

G.O.A.T.
I was wondering last night if smaller height players, for example me at 5'7, should aim to master the two hander? I'll assume the smaller players will get balls higher then their strike zones lore often.

I've got a 2hbh but lately played around with the ohbh so I am kind of feeling the differences. No question the 1hbh creates more power, I'd say more than forehand which is my best. But the 2hbh i feel has a bigger strike zone
It makes sense what you say!! Except that one of the best one handers was Justine Henin and she was like 4'...every ball she hit was a high ball and there is no wonder her grip was more extreme.

Go with what feels more natural and will give you more confidence.
 

BlackTatsu

New User
I have to agree with you here. I'm hitting a OHBH right now and it feels very loose and free. However, footwork and positioning is key if you want to get the most out of it. Not to mention it just feels amazing when you rip a perfect shot with it. The margin for error is way smaller than a THBH though. I've been kicking around the idea of changing up to the two-hander as I play more matches simply because it might prove more reliable in pressure situations and for rallies. Would love to hear more of your thoughts on it.
I've been playing a few matches with the OHBH and realize I have to dictate more with my forehand. You have to build the points with your forehand so developing that is important too for a OHBH. With that in mind, I don't have as much pace as I did with my 2HBH and don't have much room to play aggressively on both wings.
One thing I do like about playing the OHBH, it has helped me work on my forehand as I mentioned earlier. I used to do an inside out 2HBH because I trust it more than my forehand, sounds crazy but that was me.
 

Wheelz

Semi-Pro
I don't have as much pace as I did with my 2HBH and don't have much room to play aggressively on both wings.
To me the OHBH is clearly more powerful (I have a 2h backhand, i guess its not good hehe). I guess it depends of sports background, preference, etc. Its a bit too much an all or nothing the ohbh for me, when I play around with it I try to find a nice rally ball.
 

Demented

Rookie
Not that I'm an expert but for rec play you might consider the western grip OHBH. I swapped from a 2 hander to that after 3 years and I was hitting good rpm 1 handers right off the bat. The contact zone is reversed from a traditional 1 hander, it's easy to hit above the waist and up to your head but anything from hip to knee is difficult and below knee is impossible without kneeling. I slice anything coming in below my thigh and rip everything else. For anyone curious, you flip your racket over while using a semi-western forehand grip. Your pinky is to the sky and your thumb is down. Your shoulder can now rip up and out with no issue.

Here's a video of Richard Gasquet who plays in this style:
 

BevelDevil

Hall of Fame
That is because almost 100% of modern pro players started when they could barely pick up a racquet with one hand let alone hit the ball.
This reason is obsolete. There are shorter and lighter weight racquets available, along with balls that bounce low.

The reasons the 1hbh is hard to teach to the very young has to do with its demanding footwork, the grip changes, the counter-intuitive nature of a backhanded swing (as opposed to lefty forehand), and lastly the need to develop a slice in order to play with a 1hbh.


^ So much this.
That said, real talk: you’re never going to be very good at hitting a one hander, almost no rec players are. A two hander is so much easier for rec players to be competent at thier offhand side of the court. It’s taught for a reason.
But again, if you fantasize nuking Wawrinka bombs... well, bombs away.
This is analogous to the "modern forehand" argument and rec players. So much comes down to how much time you're willing to put in, and whether there will be someone there to train you. Imo, once-a-week players should just slice everything.


I was wondering last night if smaller height players, for example me at 5'7, should aim to master the two hander? I'll assume the smaller players will get balls higher then their strike zones lore often.

I've got a 2hbh but lately played around with the ohbh so I am kind of feeling the differences. No question the 1hbh creates more power, I'd say more than forehand which is my best. But the 2hbh i feel has a bigger strike zone
Use a slightly more extreme grip. Put your index knuckle 1/2 bevel back from eastern. Do not go further, though.

Not that I'm an expert but for rec play you might consider the western grip OHBH. I swapped from a 2 hander to that after 3 years and I was hitting good rpm 1 handers right off the bat. The contact zone is reversed from a traditional 1 hander, it's easy to hit above the waist and up to your head but anything from hip to knee is difficult and below knee is impossible without kneeling. I slice anything coming in below my thigh and rip everything else. For anyone curious, you flip your racket over while using a semi-western forehand grip. Your pinky is to the sky and your thumb is down. Your shoulder can now rip up and out with no issue.

Here's a video of Richard Gasquet who plays in this style:
Neither Gasquet nor Henin, nor any other pro that I know of use a "western" or "semi-western" grip for the 1hbh. At most the knuckle should be between the SW fh bevel and the E bh bevel. That tiny change makes a huge difference.
 

Demented

Rookie
This reason is obsolete. There are shorter and lighter weight racquets available, along with balls that bounce low.

The reasons the 1hbh is hard to teach to the very young has to do with its demanding footwork, the grip changes, the counter-intuitive nature of a backhanded swing (as opposed to lefty forehand), and lastly the need to develop a slice in order to play with a 1hbh.




This is analogous to the "modern forehand" argument and rec players. So much comes down to how much time you're willing to put in, and whether there will be someone there to train you. Imo, once-a-week players should just slice everything.




Use a slightly more extreme grip. Put your index knuckle 1/2 bevel back from eastern. Do not go further, though.



Neither Gasquet nor Henin, nor any other pro that I know of use a "western" or "semi-western" grip for the 1hbh. At most the knuckle should be between the SW fh bevel and the E bh bevel. That tiny change makes a huge difference.
Here's a video explaining it: I was told this is called the western backhand but it uses the semi-western(forehand) bevel. Gasquet and Henin both used this bevel and reversed wrist orientation. I can play in 1 grip for both forehand and backhand using this setup. Your arm is fully pronated during the loading phase. My palm is facing the court with my pinky up and thumb down. There is no further rotation available in my arm when I'm loaded before I release my off hand.

 

HuusHould

Professional
I used to do an inside out 2HBH because I trust it more than my forehand, sounds crazy but that was me.
This is acceptable practice on the ROS, even during the rally Nalbandian used to do this, but from the centre of the court. Often head lean line and fade off.
 

Shroud

G.O.A.T.
Here's a video explaining it: I was told this is called the western backhand but it uses the semi-western(forehand) bevel. Gasquet and Henin both used this bevel and reversed wrist orientation. I can play in 1 grip for both forehand and backhand using this setup. Your arm is fully pronated during the loading phase. My palm is facing the court with my pinky up and thumb down. There is no further rotation available in my arm when I'm loaded before I release my off hand.

Brady left out one of the main advantages: no need to change grips if you hit a sw fh
 
Go with the OHBH if you want it. Problem as you found is lousey coaches who dont know how to teach it. Keep searching for a REAL coach who knows how to teach--if they're any good they need to know how to teach both. Even if a player is a 2hander when pulled wide they need to resort to one.

Secret of the Eastern OHBH : place the thumb behind the grip on the flat for support. Come 6 inches under the ball to lift it up. The thumb must be kept firm not to slip. It takes practice but worth it! Watch Pete and Roger.
 

BevelDevil

Hall of Fame
Gasquet and Henin both used this bevel and reversed wrist orientation.

Do an image search and look at their grips. They are not on bevel 8. I think Mauresmo may have come close to it, but aside from that, I've never seen a pro use this grip.

I spent a ton of time about 10 years ago Googling this stuff. You might even be able to pull up one of my old posts about it :)

That's not to say you can't make this work. I had a decent hitting partner who used to hit with this grip.
 

Cashman

Hall of Fame
I started tennis lessons right before COVID hit. Had only had three lessons and hadn’t played since I was a kid. I’m retired now. I resumed lessons when the courts opened up again. My instructor wants me to hit two handed backhand but I naturally gravitate to a one hander. He said as a new player I should be able to learn two hander and is quite insistent that I try. Tells me it’s easier but it sure doesn’t feel like it. I don’t know what I should do at this point. Keep trying or stand my ground?
Generally speaking coaches will always push beginners towards the two-hander, as it is simpler to teach and pick up.

If your goal is simply to be the best possible recreational tennis player you can be, then it is hard to argue against learning a two-hander. There are some advantages of a one-hander over the two - it's useful if you play on fast courts with a lot of slice and S&V. But overall the two-hander is much easier and quicker to develop into a solid shot - and that counts for a lot when you are a recreational player with limited time to learn and practice.

On the other hand, being the best possible player isn't always people's sole goal. I find the one-hander a much more enjoyable shot. It is challenging to work on, sure, but that also makes it very rewarding. Hitting it well is IMO the best feeling in tennis. Given I play for for enjoyment more than winning, I'm glad I settled on my one-hander.

Decide what you are primarily interested in, decide what feels right for you, and then go with it. It's your hobby.
 

mental midget

Hall of Fame
Here is a video that I like because it keeps things very simple.
At one point, the coach discusses differences with Wavrinka on one hand and Federer on the other hand, that is an interesting issue.
At the club level, Wavrinka technique may be somewhat « dangerous » to replicate, because if you rotate your trunk and open your shoulders too much, you will end up framing and missing a lot. I would rather suggest to try to copy Federer, which obviously does not mean it is the best at high level.
I would also highly recommend to take a look at Hénin BH videos. Although her grip may not be for everybody, she is a great example of how to swing and get through the ball.
henin is an awesome example, her 1hbh was absolutely flawless. lots of ways to hit it but i might pick her for just absolute textbook-ness...and i think that 'stronger' grip, with the hand a little more behind the racket, isn't a bad place to start. kuerten's was like that too. the thing about a 'weaker grip' (say, fed, edberg) is that if you're not confident and generating racket head speed you're likely to have too open a racket face and just launch it long. stronger grip keeps the face closed naturally and will help with higher balls too.
 
I feel guilty of cheating when using two hands and I don't enjoy winning points with that shot - it just doesn't give you the same satisfaction as a victorious 1HB. It is so much easier, especially when you're pushed back and under pressure. I used two hands as a junior but hardly ever since. Only when I absolutely have to win the point. :) Wawrinka for the win.
 

Tennis_Hands

Bionic Poster
The OP has already decided what she will do, so not much to add as an argument, but the comments on the experiences with coaches insisting on starting their pupils with a 2HBH shows that the prevalence of the shot has a lot to do with that, and not whether it is a "better" or "worse" to use OHBH or 2HBH.

To me the OH is a more satisfying shot on multiple levels. The 2HBH feels cramped and for an elderly person who doesn't possess the mobility its reach can also be a problem. Obviously timing should be very good, but one finds pretty quickly, If he/she has it, or not.

:cool:
 

HuusHould

Professional
Go with the OHBH if you want it. Problem as you found is lousey coaches who dont know how to teach it. Keep searching for a REAL coach who knows how to teach--if they're any good they need to know how to teach both. Even if a player is a 2hander when pulled wide they need to resort to one.
As a coach, I probably find the double hander easier to teach, even though I'm a single hander myself. The fact that there's positive transfer from their dominant side fh (assuming they're going to have a non dominant arm dominant 2hbh) is a big advantage. You just get them to think about how they deal with different balls on their fh (grip change, footwork, stance etc) and get them to mirror that with their 2hbh.
 

Dartagnan64

G.O.A.T.
I'd like to reiterate a few points:

1) 3 lessons not enough time to decide.
2) What feels natural initially is often not good long term technique. We all see "self taught" players that have terrible form.
3) Very few rec players 3.0-4.0 have 1HBH's that are even serviceable. Many more with 2HBH's are more competent off that wing. That is likely where you are going to be, despite your dreams of being an Open player.


Let us know how things worked out. 2HBH is a bit like learning to ride a bike or snowboard. It seems awful at first but once it clicks it becomes very natural and you can't remember why it was so tough to begin with.
 

Cashman

Hall of Fame
3) Very few rec players 3.0-4.0 have 1HBH's that are even serviceable.
I am not sure about that.

I think that one thing you have to accept when you hit a one-hander is that the modern topspin stroke is an advanced shot. These days it is drilled into everyone that topspin is your bread and butter rally shot, so everyone feels they have to hit a topspin backhand 90% of the time, which makes hitting a one-hander very difficult indeed.

If you abandon that preconception and hit a more traditional flatter or sliced one-hander, it is fairly easy to turn it into a solid stroke. And if it was good enough for McEnroe and Graf, it’s going to be good enough for rec tennis.
 

Demented

Rookie
Do an image search and look at their grips. They are not on bevel 8. I think Mauresmo may have come close to it, but aside from that, I've never seen a pro use this grip.

I spent a ton of time about 10 years ago Googling this stuff. You might even be able to pull up one of my old posts about it :)

That's not to say you can't make this work. I had a decent hitting partner who used to hit with this grip.
It's not really about the exact bevel. It's the Hand/wrist orientation that makes the 'western' or semi-western backhand unique. My hand/elbow are inverted and pointing to the sky. This changes the direction of my rotator cuff and switches me to using tricep extension(similar to a serve) as my power source. I came right out of the box day 1 hitting ~55 mph(2100 rpm) backhands using already built up muscles. Because I also have a semi-western forehand, I don't have to make any grip changes and can sit in my waiting stance with either forehand or backhand prepped at the same time. It's literally the exactly opposite of my forehand. When my windshield wiper forehand comes across my face, I've loaded my backhand and can windshield wiper the other way.
 

HuusHould

Professional
If you abandon that preconception and hit a more traditional flatter or sliced one-hander, it is fairly easy to turn it into a solid stroke. And if it was good enough for McEnroe and Graf, it’s going to be good enough for rec tennis.
This is true, but we're really talking about the drive backhand, as hitting a 2hbh, doesn't inhibit your ability to hit a 1h slice bh in any significant way, where necessary. Guys like Nalbandian and Hewitt had 1h slice bhs as good as anyone. OP could even slice with 2 hands when the balls within reach like Santoro and Hsieh.
 
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HuusHould

Professional
I agree hitting a one handed slice is all OP needs, you could even get to 5.0 with just that, which probably far exceeds what they need. But I think hitting a flattish 1h drive isn't much easier than a topspin one.
 

Cashman

Hall of Fame
But I think hitting a flattish 1h drive isn't much easier than a topspin one.
Really? I think it is. You can hit a good flattish one-hander with a fairly conventional classic stroke.

I mean, up until graphite racquets came along a lot of people hit flat one-handers, but the number of good topspin one-handers was very short. Budge, Trabert, Laver and Vilas come to mind but not really anyone else.
 

cortado

Rookie
If you can learn even a half-way decent one-hander then all the other recreational players you meet will think you're some kind of pro. People are really impressed by one-handers (normal people, not talk-tennis nerd people).
I also find that one-hand is a very natural, fluid-feeling stroke, whereas two-hand is not. One-hand feels like I coil up, then release and un-coil. Two-hand feels like I coil up one way only to finish coiled-up the other way - feels uncomfortable for the lower back.
 

Slicerman

Semi-Pro
I was wondering last night if smaller height players, for example me at 5'7, should aim to master the two hander? I'll assume the smaller players will get balls higher then their strike zones lore often.

I've got a 2hbh but lately played around with the ohbh so I am kind of feeling the differences. No question the 1hbh creates more power, I'd say more than forehand which is my best. But the 2hbh i feel has a bigger strike zone
I'm also 5'7 and dealing with high balls are more tough. That is one of the reasons why I switched to a 2-hander. I find it easier to take balls earlier using a 2-hander. I played with a 1-hander for almost 2 years then switched to 2-hander, so I have experience with both. After two months of using a 2-hander it was already better than my 1-hander. So I agree with the steeper learning curve of the 1-hander as some of you mentioned. I think 1-hander has more power potential and variety though. A player can produce more racquet speed using 1-hand, and also the ability to supinate more freely can allow you to hit a large variety of spins. Although I gave up on using a 1-hander, the time I spent previously has given me good fundamentals for my slice backhand.

I think the main advantages of a 2-hander is that it's a more resilient shot under pressure. You can still hit a good shot with a shortened swing, which is helpful if you need to time a difficult ball. I also find high balls (head height) not too difficult to handle with a 2-hander.
 

Demented

Rookie
The 2 handed short stroke flick isn't exactly hard to master. I play 1 handed unless someone jams me with good depth. I just add a hand and the block it back essentially. I think it's kind of silly to say you need to choose one or two. Play the easy balls with the 1 hander and the hard ones with the 2.
 

Dartagnan64

G.O.A.T.
I am not sure about that.

I think that one thing you have to accept when you hit a one-hander is that the modern topspin stroke is an advanced shot. These days it is drilled into everyone that topspin is your bread and butter rally shot, so everyone feels they have to hit a topspin backhand 90% of the time, which makes hitting a one-hander very difficult indeed.

If you abandon that preconception and hit a more traditional flatter or sliced one-hander, it is fairly easy to turn it into a solid stroke. And if it was good enough for McEnroe and Graf, it’s going to be good enough for rec tennis.
true but it doesn’t change the fact that virtually every intermediate I see with a 1hbh can’t do much more than lob or slice with it and generally run around it as much as possible.

And I think you can get away with that more in singles. In doubles, that lob or slice better be good quality or it’s coming back with interest from the net guy. There’s a reason, “serve to the BH” is dogma at intermediate levels.
 

slicewiw

New User
I think everyone is wired differently. I have always used a one handed back handed. 2 hands I feel too constricted and feel like I can’t generate the power or topspin that I can with with my one hander. 2 hands feels like how I feel when I throw or write left handed. Extremely awkward.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
I am in the same situation that you are in, I cannot hit a sitter on a two handed backhand.
 

pencilcheck

Professional
true but it doesn’t change the fact that virtually every intermediate I see with a 1hbh can’t do much more than lob or slice with it and generally run around it as much as possible.

And I think you can get away with that more in singles. In doubles, that lob or slice better be good quality or it’s coming back with interest from the net guy. There’s a reason, “serve to the BH” is dogma at intermediate levels.
Interesting, I was told that 2hbh is typically harder to hit topspin and 1hbh can easily. I agree and I notice similar things too because I can hit topspin 1hbh all the time, I guess maybe everyone is different?
 

rkelley

Hall of Fame
Do what's fun. If you want to try a 1hbh, then do it. Find a coach who can teach it. I'd also say do it now while you're learning. The 1hbh is a harder stroke to learn for most people. Even if you switch to a 2hbh later on, it's good to have had the experience with the 1hbh.
 

cortado

Rookie
Do what's fun. If you want to try a 1hbh, then do it. Find a coach who can teach it. I'd also say do it now while you're learning. The 1hbh is a harder stroke to learn for most people. Even if you switch to a 2hbh later on, it's good to have had the experience with the 1hbh.
Exactly, it's never going to hurt to have to learn early preparation and good footwork.
 
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