Unsporting behaviour?

I was playing an older gentleman from my local ladder league. I've played him before and he's a nice guy, but he somewhat annoyed me when we played this time round (I beat him last time, but he won out this time).

I noticed he was a bit more vocal than usual, but what offended me was that after any of my UNFORCED error and FORCED errors he CHEERED with a 'Yeah!'

Now, I normally give a little fist pump if I thrown down an ace or a unreturnable and I may shout if I hit a winner following an extended rally. But I never ever cheers my opponents error.

I think it's extremely unsporting. Especially at recreational level. I normally shout 'unlucky'.

I did notice the pros doing this, Richard Gasquet was fist pumping aggressively following opponent errors.

So, what do you the jury think? Was my opponent's behaviour acceptable?

KL
 

Turbo-87

Legend
I think it's fine. He won a point in some manner so he celebrated. Would I do it? Nope. Would it bother me? Nope.
 

volusiano

Hall of Fame
It's called cheering winning a point, regardless of how it's won.

You should be annoyed that you made the unforced (or forced) error. But you shouldn't be annoyed that he cheers on winning a point for himself.
 

Bionic slice

Semi-Pro
Have you ever watched a Lleyton Hewitt salute "C'mon". Love or hate him some people are going to celebrate. Its a part of sports. If someone does something like this, it fires me up.
I like to do the bolo yang....(for all those bloodsport fans)

 
I was playing an older gentleman from my local ladder league. I've played him before and he's a nice guy, but he somewhat annoyed me when we played this time round (I beat him last time, but he won out this time).

I noticed he was a bit more vocal than usual, but what offended me was that after any of my UNFORCED error and FORCED errors he CHEERED with a 'Yeah!'

Now, I normally give a little fist pump if I thrown down an ace or a unreturnable and I may shout if I hit a winner following an extended rally. But I never ever cheers my opponents error.

I think it's extremely unsporting. Especially at recreational level. I normally shout 'unlucky'.

I did notice the pros doing this, Richard Gasquet was fist pumping aggressively following opponent errors.

So, what do you the jury think? Was my opponent's behaviour acceptable?

KL
Dude, that's like worse than a C'mon. :roll:
 

Mr.Lob

Legend
I was playing an older gentleman from my local ladder league. I've played him before and he's a nice guy, but he somewhat annoyed me when we played this time round (I beat him last time, but he won out this time).

I noticed he was a bit more vocal than usual, but what offended me was that after any of my UNFORCED error and FORCED errors he CHEERED with a 'Yeah!'

Now, I normally give a little fist pump if I thrown down an ace or a unreturnable and I may shout if I hit a winner following an extended rally. But I never ever cheers my opponents error.

I think it's extremely unsporting. Especially at recreational level. I normally shout 'unlucky'.

I did notice the pros doing this, Richard Gasquet was fist pumping aggressively following opponent errors.

So, what do you the jury think? Was my opponent's behaviour acceptable?

KL
That he has changed his on court behavior is telling. You've annoyed the ole goat in some way. So now he's giving it back to you.
 
Thanks for the replies.

He didn't overtly cheer any of my double faults. I guess I've never come across this behaviour on court.

I did have one guy that would loudly stamp his feet as I approached net or before a smash to presumably try and put me off. I soon stopped playing him.

I actually like this old goat but being a British, unsporting behaviour is frowned upon. I will try and focus on it firing me up, but at the time I was disappointed and couldn't believe he was cheering shanked shots

KL
 

West Coast Ace

G.O.A.T.
Have you ever watched a Lleyton Hewitt salute "C'mon".
Hewitt would only do that (that I remember seeing) if there was a long point and he was playing incredible defense and managed to survive and turn the point around and THEN his opponent hit a UE.

OP, as others have said, if you let it bother you, that's on you. If that's the worse thing he does, count yourself lucky.
 

Turbo-87

Legend
Hewitt would only do that (that I remember seeing) if there was a long point and he was playing incredible defense and managed to survive and turn the point around and THEN his opponent hit a UE.

OP, as others have said, if you let it bother you, that's on you. If that's the worse thing he does, count yourself lucky.
That's a good point. I also wouldn't look at it as celebrating a UE either. Maybe he was happy he was able to stay in the point and keep the ball in play long enough so that the opponent made the error. Nothing wrong with celebrating that. Now if he starts doing the worm, Electric Boogaloo, moonwalking or breaking out a piece of cardboard for a backspin, I'd have a problem with that.
 

eelhc

Hall of Fame
It's not good behavior and it happens often at all levels of play. Nothing new... I don't like it and IMO the only time it's appropriate is if the error results in a set or match win (big points).

The fact the OP is bothering posting it here though means it bothered him enough to spend some time after the match on it. Not sure if the behavior affected the OPs performance during the match but if it did... the OP needs to just suck it up and get mentally tougher.

Years and years ago when I played youth/school sports, I was fortunate enough to have good coaches who taught good sportsmanship and teamwork. They would have sat those players who behaved this way...
 

beernutz

Hall of Fame
I was playing an older gentleman from my local ladder league. I've played him before and he's a nice guy, but he somewhat annoyed me when we played this time round (I beat him last time, but he won out this time).

I noticed he was a bit more vocal than usual, but what offended me was that after any of my UNFORCED error and FORCED errors he CHEERED with a 'Yeah!'

Now, I normally give a little fist pump if I thrown down an ace or a unreturnable and I may shout if I hit a winner following an extended rally. But I never ever cheers my opponents error.

I think it's extremely unsporting. Especially at recreational level. I normally shout 'unlucky'.

I did notice the pros doing this, Richard Gasquet was fist pumping aggressively following opponent errors.

So, what do you the jury think? Was my opponent's behaviour acceptable?

KL
Maybe your opponent was thinking about the results from the last time you played him and was attempting to fire himself up and/or get in your head to force a different outcome? If so it apparently worked so you should expect to see the same behavior next time you play him.

OTOH, maybe something you do grated on him and his behavior was an attempt to get even in his mind? Perhaps your shouts when you hit winners after extended rallys are perceived differently by him than you view them?
 
...I actually like this old goat
If he's really old and was not trained to not blurt out utterances while playing, he may unable to control himself. I just played a social mx'er, which I haven't done in a long time, and was shocked and annoyed by all the needless chatter while hitting, by most all the social players. They'd be mishitting balls and commenting on what they (or their partner) did wrong on each shot. Couldn't tell whether they were calling it out or what??? This is why good players avoid playing rec, it's not the shots but all the other stuff the club dregs are clueless about, that becomes increasingly annoying by beer & pretzel time, you just want to run away, jump into a hot-tub and tell yourself never to do it again. Your "old goat" may not be able to control what's knockin' around in his brain--just a theory. My dad did the same thing when he got older, just said whatever he was thinking, could be embarrassing or really funny, we may all be there someday.
 
Thanks for all the replies.

Clearly his behaviour annoyed me, it was different from when we last played and I play on average 2 matches per week and some mixed club doubles, I have never come across anyone who cheers an opponents UE's.

I have just been watching some French Open though and I note that the pros pretty much do it all the time. Clearly the stakes are higher but hey ho.

@Tennis Tom - He's probably about 60 something, so not that old. But you're right, it could be a case of verbal diarrhoea.

I still prefer to play player who didn't do this.

KL
 

CurrenFan

Rookie
I think it's bad form to cheer an UE. But turn on your TV this week and you'll see multiple WTA and ATP pros doing it.
 
Better to play with your mouth shut. There's no need to cheer your own winners. Many, not all, would find that rude, and very possibly he did in the first match you played. The time for celebrating is after the victory - and perhaps not even in your opponent's presence. There's plenty of fun left in the game even after that bit of fun is excised. Just because some pros do it does not make it sporting.
 

LuckyR

Legend
I was playing an older gentleman from my local ladder league. I've played him before and he's a nice guy, but he somewhat annoyed me when we played this time round (I beat him last time, but he won out this time).

I noticed he was a bit more vocal than usual, but what offended me was that after any of my UNFORCED error and FORCED errors he CHEERED with a 'Yeah!'

Now, I normally give a little fist pump if I thrown down an ace or a unreturnable and I may shout if I hit a winner following an extended rally. But I never ever cheers my opponents error.

I think it's extremely unsporting. Especially at recreational level. I normally shout 'unlucky'.

I did notice the pros doing this, Richard Gasquet was fist pumping aggressively following opponent errors.

So, what do you the jury think? Was my opponent's behaviour acceptable?

KL
Funny. I never do that unless the other team is using some form of gamesmanship, then I will do exactly what your opponent did. The funny thing is, it ALWAYS lowers their playing level. I do not believe this would be true of all (or even most) opponents, but among gamesmanship people, they seem unusually vulnerable to it.
 

marsh

Semi-Pro
Cheering when your opponent hits an unforced error is sportsman like period. Now, I see plenty of players do it. It's extremely annoying to me, but I do my best to ignore it when playing an opponent that thinks it's acceptable.

My test for sportsmanship is considering if I would encourage or correct my child for behaving that way. In this case I would definitely straighten his a__ out over behavior like this on court.
 

Moveforwardalways

Hall of Fame
I experienced unsporting behavior in my last match. When I would hit a shot that would bounce near the service line, the other chap would take a few steps into the court and try to hit the ball very hard to my backhand corner. Many of these shots went in and even a few hit the line. This made it very difficult to return the ball and it very much diminished my enjoyment of playing the match. Afterwards I confronted him about it and all he said was "cherrio there old chap" and smiled. Quite unsporting, IMO.
 

volusiano

Hall of Fame
I experienced unsporting behavior in my last match. When I would hit a shot that would bounce near the service line, the other chap would take a few steps into the court and try to hit the ball very hard to my backhand corner. Many of these shots went in and even a few hit the line. This made it very difficult to return the ball and it very much diminished my enjoyment of playing the match. Afterwards I confronted him about it and all he said was "cherrio there old chap" and smiled. Quite unsporting, IMO.
I don't get it. You're mad at him for hitting winning shots that are hard and fast pace? What's wrong with that?
 

Nostradamus

Bionic Poster
I was playing an older gentleman from my local ladder league. I've played him before and he's a nice guy, but he somewhat annoyed me when we played this time round (I beat him last time, but he won out this time).

I noticed he was a bit more vocal than usual, but what offended me was that after any of my UNFORCED error and FORCED errors he CHEERED with a 'Yeah!'

Now, I normally give a little fist pump if I thrown down an ace or a unreturnable and I may shout if I hit a winner following an extended rally. But I never ever cheers my opponents error.

I think it's extremely unsporting. Especially at recreational level. I normally shout 'unlucky'.

I did notice the pros doing this, Richard Gasquet was fist pumping aggressively following opponent errors.

So, what do you the jury think? Was my opponent's behaviour acceptable?

KL
It is tennis. and people need to be pumped up to play well. I yell Cmon when I hit a winner or my opponent makes an unforced error too especially if it is on important point. and I don't mean anything bad by it....

As long as guy isn't staring you down or Swearing at you.,,,,i think all is ok. but if somebody swears at you, I think that is bad............
 
Better to play with your mouth shut. There's no need to cheer your own winners. Many, not all, would find that rude, and very possibly he did in the first match you played. The time for celebrating is after the victory - and perhaps not even in your opponent's presence. There's plenty of fun left in the game even after that bit of fun is excised. Just because some pros do it does not make it sporting.
I am not that noisy, but I do behave like Andy Murray on court at times, ie berating myself. I cannot play tennis silently, I also let out an occasional grunt as well :oops:


Cheering when your opponent hits an unforced error is sportsman like period. Now, I see plenty of players do it. It's extremely annoying to me, but I do my best to ignore it when playing an opponent that thinks it's acceptable.

My test for sportsmanship is considering if I would encourage or correct my child for behaving that way. In this case I would definitely straighten his a__ out over behavior like this on court.
I like this approach. . .


I was playing a friend tonight, he beat me 4 and 5 last week but I avenged defeat to beat him 1 and 5

On my winners and his FORCED error, I let out a Murray esque fist pump (with no noise) . . . I actually felt bad for doing this.

Damn my Britishness
 

jmc3367

Rookie
I don't cheer my opponents errors and i don't clap when my son is playing and his opponent makes an error or a double fault.
 

Flootoo

Rookie
I've got a long way to go on this- I let out a cry of despair when I end up giving them an easy shot. Is it audible from the other end? Not sure.

Years ago, playing football, I was being approached by an attacking Brazilian. I was sure I'd end up on my ass without even slowing him down at all in his advance towards goal. Somehow he made a mistake and I was able to slide the ball out of his reach and pass it safely up the wing. I said "thanks" out loud, without meaning to- I was so relieved!
Not surprisingly, the next time he was near I ended up getting rammed from behind, his knee in my mid-thigh and studs pressed into the top of my other foot.
 

dgold44

G.O.A.T.
I was playing an older gentleman from my local ladder league. I've played him before and he's a nice guy, but he somewhat annoyed me when we played this time round (I beat him last time, but he won out this time).

I noticed he was a bit more vocal than usual, but what offended me was that after any of my UNFORCED error and FORCED errors he CHEERED with a 'Yeah!'

Now, I normally give a little fist pump if I thrown down an ace or a unreturnable and I may shout if I hit a winner following an extended rally. But I never ever cheers my opponents error.

I think it's extremely unsporting. Especially at recreational level. I normally shout 'unlucky'.

I did notice the pros doing this, Richard Gasquet was fist pumping aggressively following opponent errors.

So, what do you the jury think? Was my opponent's behaviour acceptable?

KL
If only happened a few times I would ignore it
 

Dartagnan64

G.O.A.T.
I think in rec tennis, especially social matches, decorum should rule and you shouldn't try to pile on your opponent. If its a long point that ends in an unforced error, celebration is the norm. At our level maintaining a long rally of any sort is a cause for celebration. But fist pumping after you set your opponent up with an easy ball and he misses, well, that's just being a butthole. You should be just thanking the tennis gods and letting out a big sigh of relief.

Acceptable moments of Fist Pumping/C'mon/Let's go/Vamos:
1) Winning a 10+ shot rally by any means
2) Hitting a winner after setting up the point
3) Hitting an Ace (unless its against a lower rated lady in mixed)
4) Hitting a return winner
5) Winning a point where you've been on defense the whole time
6) Hitting a great passing shot against an opponent at net

Unacceptable times for self-congratulation:
1) lob winners (unless its a superiorly struck topspin lob)
2) Acing a lower rated woman in mixed
3) Opponent hits an unforced error early in any point
4) Any close line call (one of you got lucky, just accept it and move on)
5) Winning a point by overhead smash (the smash says it all, no need to gloat)
6) Winning a point by hitting an opponent's feet or legs

Times where you should just raise your hand in faux-apology
1) net cord winners
2) winning shots off a clay court line
3) frame shot winners
4) underhand serve ace
6) winning a point by hitting an opponents head or body
 

Matthew ATX

Semi-Pro
I never congratulate myself verbally*. It just always feels like taunting and I just don't feel comfortable doing it. I will congratulate my doubles partners according to the solid list Dart just posted though.

*The occasional clinched fist will happen on a big point after I hit a very good shot, but even then I try to turn my back so the opponent doesn't see it, lol.
 

2ndServe

Hall of Fame
Thanks for all the replies.

Clearly his behaviour annoyed me, it was different from when we last played and I play on average 2 matches per week and some mixed club doubles, I have never come across anyone who cheers an opponents UE's.

I have just been watching some French Open though and I note that the pros pretty much do it all the time. Clearly the stakes are higher but hey ho.

@Tennis Tom - He's probably about 60 something, so not that old. But you're right, it could be a case of verbal diarrhoea.

I still prefer to play player who didn't do this.

KL
I don't care but it's every UE that's a bit much cause us rec players hit a ton or UE. Just do the same sht he did. Or find someone else to play there's way too many opponents to choose from
 

PK6

Rookie
When things get bad/you can’t do anything do what I do-quit during match and walk off without saying anything.
 

5sets

Professional
There’s really no such thing as an unforced error IMO.

E.g you have an 10 shot rally and he lines a BH crosscourt and you net your BH and he vocally let out positive emotion.

Is that really unsportsmanlike?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Dartagnan64

G.O.A.T.
There’s really no such thing as an unforced error IMO.

E.g you have an 10 shot rally and he lines a BH crosscourt and you net your BH and he vocally let out positive emotion.

Is that really unsportsmanlike?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Double fault?

I'd agree at low levels, any ball back over the net can be a forcing shot, so unforced errors should be considered only for very obvious easy shots (basically serves and balls that come in at the height and pace of coaching feeds)
 

5sets

Professional
I’ll play Devil’s Advocate here just to keep the conversation going and argue that even at ATP 16 UTR level matches double faults are forced because they usually occur when facing a solid returner, e.g. a Rafa or Nishikori.

Nobody wants to bloop their second serve in so their opponent can tee off on it.


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Dartagnan64

G.O.A.T.
I’ll play Devil’s Advocate here just to keep the conversation going and argue that even at ATP 16 UTR level matches double faults are forced because they usually occur when facing a solid returner, e.g. a Rafa or Nishikori.

Nobody wants to bloop their second serve in so their opponent can tee off on it.


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Well in retort, i'd differentiate errors due to "trying to do too much" from errors due to an opponents challenging shot. The former should still stand in the unforced error camp because no one is holding a gun to your head to go for a big second serve, or a DTL winner, or a drop shot from behind the baseline.
 

5sets

Professional
Agreed.

Just funny at tour level these guys’ rally balls are coming at eachother 65-70mph and spread throughout the court.

Kind of funny to think of missing one as an unforced error.


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Big_Dangerous

Talk Tennis Guru
I think in rec tennis, especially social matches, decorum should rule and you shouldn't try to pile on your opponent. If its a long point that ends in an unforced error, celebration is the norm. At our level maintaining a long rally of any sort is a cause for celebration. But fist pumping after you set your opponent up with an easy ball and he misses, well, that's just being a butthole. You should be just thanking the tennis gods and letting out a big sigh of relief.

Acceptable moments of Fist Pumping/C'mon/Let's go/Vamos:
1) Winning a 10+ shot rally by any means
2) Hitting a winner after setting up the point
3) Hitting an Ace (unless its against a lower rated lady in mixed)
4) Hitting a return winner
5) Winning a point where you've been on defense the whole time
6) Hitting a great passing shot against an opponent at net

Unacceptable times for self-congratulation:
1) lob winners (unless its a superiorly struck topspin lob)
2) Acing a lower rated woman in mixed
3) Opponent hits an unforced error early in any point
4) Any close line call (one of you got lucky, just accept it and move on)
5) Winning a point by overhead smash (the smash says it all, no need to gloat)
6) Winning a point by hitting an opponent's feet or legs

Times where you should just raise your hand in faux-apology
1) net cord winners
2) winning shots off a clay court line
3) frame shot winners
4) underhand serve ace
6) winning a point by hitting an opponents head or body
Great list. (y)

I remember once many years ago, I was playing a guy in a league match and I was matchpoint up, and he had me on defense in the point. I hit a really bad lob from behind the baseline and it set him up for an easy overhead smash. He ended up netting the ball and I just remember looking at him like, "I can't believe you let me off the hook, lol." I didn't fist pump or celebrate or anything, I was just stunned. I actually felt kind of bad, because it's almost like you hate for a match to end that way.
 

Big_Dangerous

Talk Tennis Guru
When things get bad/you can’t do anything do what I do-quit during match and walk off without saying anything.
Then you just look like a psychopath...

Seriously, I would seek some professional help if I were you. "And a regular psychiatrist can't even help you. You need to go to like Vienna or something. Not the once a week for 80 bucks, no you need a team!"

 

ChaelAZ

G.O.A.T.
I was playing an older gentleman from my local ladder league. I've played him before and he's a nice guy, but he somewhat annoyed me when we played this time round (I beat him last time, but he won out this time).

I noticed he was a bit more vocal than usual, but what offended me was that after any of my UNFORCED error and FORCED errors he CHEERED with a 'Yeah!'

Now, I normally give a little fist pump if I thrown down an ace or a unreturnable and I may shout if I hit a winner following an extended rally. But I never ever cheers my opponents error.

I think it's extremely unsporting. Especially at recreational level. I normally shout 'unlucky'.

I did notice the pros doing this, Richard Gasquet was fist pumping aggressively following opponent errors.

So, what do you the jury think? Was my opponent's behaviour acceptable?

KL

Unless he is distracting you during points, he can be yelling and talking as much as he wants after and between. I have played guys like that too many times to mention, and it can get a little testy if you listen. So take it as a learning moment to learn to block outside distractions and focus on your internal motivation. You can also use it to motivate you to play better in each point so you don't have to listen to it as much. Turn those cheers into whining and tears!
 

reedfe

New User
Bro chillax. At the club level most points are won off of unforced errors. He's just happy he outlasted you in a point. Players that do that are typically mentally weak themselves. You start to do it in return and I bet you'll start getting under his skin. GOTTA COMPETE MY BROTHER. Seriously, if you ain't tryna win why are you playing?
 

5sets

Professional
Haha, perhaps he was exactly the same way in the first match but it didn’t bother you as much because you won. After a stinging loss one tends to knit pick every detail as to why and how they lost.


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