Update on my Game!

#1
Hey guys! I have posted some videos for the past couple of months and have received a bunch of feedback which I tried to implement into my game. Basically I have gotten lower on my groundies and also brought more intensity during my practices. (Also needed to shed some weight as i was told) lol. I was fixing my technique a while back and just started to slack off on putting more work while I’m on that court. The first vid is New and how I’m hitting now and the second is the old one just for you guys to compare a bit.


Try to skim through the first few minutes as I start off a bit slow and relaxed. I go for more towards the last 3 minutes of the vid.

EDIT: the girl is a 4.5 doubles player and the guy in the second vid is also 4.5 I believe




let me know what you guys think!
 
#3
Forehand and backhand look pretty solid. I think the forehand preparation might be more consistent, and mechanics look more repeatable from stroke to stroke. I would need to really slow it down to see more. Maybe later.
 
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#5
Forehand and backhand look pretty solid. I think the forehand preparation might be more consistent, and mechanics look more repeatable from stroke to stroke. I would need to really slow it down to see more. Maybe later.
My forehand is definitely more dependable. I have been working on the backhand lately — figuring it out more each time I step on court. The main problem is I can’t seem to get the consistent contact point on it (my footwork gets lost very often). I guess I just need more reps on that side.
 
#8
Hey guys! I have posted some videos for the past couple of months and have received a bunch of feedback which I tried to implement into my game. Basically I have gotten lower on my groundies and also brought more intensity during my practices. (Also needed to shed some weight as i was told) lol. I was fixing my technique a while back and just started to slack off on putting more work while I’m on that court. The first vid is New and how I’m hitting now and the second is the old one just for you guys to compare a bit.


Try to skim through the first few minutes as I start off a bit slow and relaxed. I go for more towards the last 3 minutes of the vid.

EDIT: the girl is a 4.5 doubles player and the guy in the second vid is also 4.5 I believe




let me know what you guys think!
At 7:19 you hit a cross-court topspin approach shot, and got passed. NEVER hit cross-court topspin approach shots! Hit slice down the line!
 
#15
My forehand is definitely more dependable. I have been working on the backhand lately — figuring it out more each time I step on court. The main problem is I can’t seem to get the consistent contact point on it (my footwork gets lost very often). I guess I just need more reps on that side.
I looked at it a bit more. The forehand looks more fluid more often. Just a consistently better overall kinetic chain, better position and timing from the ground up. Maybe trying to get lower and more intense improved your overall footwork and timing.

As for your backhand, there are some things you can do to as far as the swing to make it stronger, but that really doesn't do much for you if you are not in good position. When I was first taking tennis more serious, my hiting partner would get frustrated. he couldn't understand how I could hit at certain level, but then start missing easy balls, or whatever. Basically, I found I was just having problems judging the ball. I remember my stringer, who coaches, was talking about pros vs. rec. After throwing out a few things, he said, well the pros just see the ball better anyway. I would say a majority of my mishits are misjudging the ball and bad positioning. For pros to copy, I would check out Agassi, Safin, Djokovic Nalbandian, Malisse and Vince Spadea. All those guys had weapons backhands. I know some might say Spadea wasn't a damaging as the rest, but I never really saw anyone hit through Spadea's backhand.
 
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#17
Forehand Separation Angle. There have been many posts discussing separation. Imagine a line between the two shoulders. Imagine a line between the two hips. In general, the line between the shoulders should rotate back farther than the line between the two hips. Imaging viewing these lines from above and the angle that they would form. The line between the shoulders should turn back farther than the line between the hips. In the forward stroke, the hips line should lead the shoulders line. Djokovic is very flexible and shows separation and its timing more than most ATP players.

Note that the hips rotate plus the trunk twists above the hips. Both these turn the uppermost body.

Look at the white lines on your shorts at the waist. Look at your hitting shoulder above it. They seem to move together, not much separation. Compare to the turn back and forward separation angle vs time of Djokovic.

Separation and its timing on the forehand.

Separation adds more trunk twist by increasing the angle for the trunk rotation and stretching muscles. Twisting your trunk/spine may be too stressful for your spine. Djokovic has more flexibility than most ATP player.
 
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#19
Thank you! I have been told that I don’t move enough haha.

I’m curios, Why would you pick that approach out of the rest?
Haha purely because I did not watch all of it. I skipped ahead a few minutes, watch some, then skip some again. That approach happened to fall into what I watched. I'll watch more when I have more time at home.

That approach has the front foot skipping step that I'm trying to do too to varying degree of success. I guess it comes naturally once you have more practices on it?
 
#21
Haha purely because I did not watch all of it. I skipped ahead a few minutes, watch some, then skip some again. That approach happened to fall into what I watched. I'll watch more when I have more time at home.

That approach has the front foot skipping step that I'm trying to do too to varying degree of success. I guess it comes naturally once you have more practices on it?
Yup! It just happens naturally now. I try not to think too much when making adjustments. Just let it happen naturally bc hesitating is not a good thing haha
 
#22
could be, most of his backhands are just off camera it seems
Yeah it’s semi-western for both. Just this past week I was adjusting my backhand a bit. I shifted it slightly more to the Eastern side and I felt a lot more connected to the ball. A subtle adjustment that will change my entire game. Man, I love how complicated tennis is sometimes
 
#23
Forehand Separation Angle. There have been many posts discussing separation. Imagine a line between the two shoulders. Imagine a line between the two hips. In general, the line between the shoulders should rotate back farther than the line between the two hips. Imaging viewing these lines from above and the angle that they would form. The line between the shoulders should turn back farther than the line between the hips. In the forward stroke, the hips line should lead the shoulders line. Djokovic is very flexible and shows separation and its timing more than most ATP players.

Note that the hips rotate plus the trunk twists above the hips. Both these turn the uppermost body.

Look at the white lines on your shorts at the waist. Look at your hitting shoulder above it. They seem to move together, not much separation. Compare to the turn back and forward separation angle vs time of Djokovic.

Separation and its timing on the forehand.

Separation adds more trunk twist by increasing the angle for the trunk rotation and stretching muscles. Twisting your trunk/spine may be too stressful for your spine. Djokovic has more flexibility than most ATP player.
Noted. I actually really believe in this separation concept because it helps a lot with early preparation and maintaining balance. Ofcourse sometimes you have to make adjustment steps so this separation differs from time to time but I think it definitely Is an improvement to anyone’s game. That’s why offcourt training — improving fitness and flexibility is important because you increase your potential do these types of stuff.
 
#24
Yeah it’s semi-western for both. Just this past week I was adjusting my backhand a bit. I shifted it slightly more to the Eastern side and I felt a lot more connected to the ball. A subtle adjustment that will change my entire game. Man, I love how complicated tennis is sometimes
As you probably know Venus uses double Eastern which is weird but good enough to win slams with :)....I just wonder if yours would be better if you slid your bottom hand to continental and leave the top hand as is. I made this change it's so much easier to swing through the ball.
 
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#29
Yeah it’s semi-western for both. Just this past week I was adjusting my backhand a bit. I shifted it slightly more to the Eastern side and I felt a lot more connected to the ball. A subtle adjustment that will change my entire game. Man, I love how complicated tennis is sometimes
You mean sw for left hand right. What is your right hand grip ... looks continental. What I have found is as long as I'm still holding right hand (I am right handed) ... changing left hand from east to sw is a minor tweak. But if I change dom hand from cont ... say eastern .... MAJOR change. I think we set our racquet face on 2hbh mainly with dom hand .. and then both hands work together in stroke. My brief experimenting with left hand sw didn't see any significant aid in topspin, and I prefer left hand eastern for driving ball, so for me cont/eastern is the way to go.
 
#31
Hey guys! I have posted some videos for the past couple of months and have received a bunch of feedback which I tried to implement into my game. Basically I have gotten lower on my groundies and also brought more intensity during my practices. (Also needed to shed some weight as i was told) lol. I was fixing my technique a while back and just started to slack off on putting more work while I’m on that court. The first vid is New and how I’m hitting now and the second is the old one just for you guys to compare a bit.


Try to skim through the first few minutes as I start off a bit slow and relaxed. I go for more towards the last 3 minutes of the vid.

EDIT: the girl is a 4.5 doubles player and the guy in the second vid is also 4.5 I believe




let me know what you guys think!
That's a very nice FH: smooth, using the kinetic chain, reproducible under various conditions. I also noticed you kept your eyes locked on the contact point even after the ball had left your strings.

In the first video at 1:42, I noticed that you don't get as much rotation with your BH as with your FH.

On your FH, your chest is pointing towards the side prior to contact and mostly towards the net at contact. But on your BH, you were pointing to the side prior to contact and moved only about 45-60 degrees at contact.

Well done on the hitting!
 
#32
At 7:19 you hit a cross-court topspin approach shot, and got passed. NEVER hit cross-court topspin approach shots! Hit slice down the line!
That's too dogmatic for me. If I took my opponent out wide and he hits DTL, going CC makes a lot of sense.

Whether I hit slice or TS is also situation-dependent: if I'm trying to stretch him out, TS is better. If he's already in position and I'm going to approach anyway, I prefer slice.
 
#33
That's too dogmatic for me. If I took my opponent out wide and he hits DTL, going CC makes a lot of sense.

Whether I hit slice or TS is also situation-dependent: if I'm trying to stretch him out, TS is better. If he's already in position and I'm going to approach anyway, I prefer slice.
Too dogmatic and too boring. Hit sharp cc to someone's FH, and approach with slice cc ALL DAY LONG. I am generally a approach dtl ... but that is a standard play to open up the backhand on someone that is good at hiding their bh (maybe good at running around).
 
#34
That's a very nice FH: smooth, using the kinetic chain, reproducible under various conditions. I also noticed you kept your eyes locked on the contact point even after the ball had left your strings.

In the first video at 1:42, I noticed that you don't get as much rotation with your BH as with your FH.

On your FH, your chest is pointing towards the side prior to contact and mostly towards the net at contact. But on your BH, you were pointing to the side prior to contact and moved only about 45-60 degrees at contact.

Well done on the hitting!
Not following you on the 2hbh contact position ... we are suppose to end up "left net postish" ... maybe a little more sideline for dtl. ???
 
#36
I was thinking he might get more rotation and therefore more power from his BH if he rotated more for the CC shots [although it's hard to tell on the ones I was watching where exactly he was aiming].
My video review of atp 2hbh and 1hbh seemed to show "left net post...ish" was the norm, even cc.

First Djoker 2hbh in video below was closed stance cc ... and at contact left net post. At 00:30 ... semi open cc ... still left net post. Another check would be fully open ... maybe 2hbh ros.

Note: you have to advance frames and freeze at contact, because it happens so fast looks like chest toward net at contact real-time.

 
#37
I was thinking he might get more rotation and therefore more power from his BH if he rotated more for the CC shots [although it's hard to tell on the ones I was watching where exactly he was aiming].
2hbh power/pace:

I am starting to see occasional 2hbh pace that brings a smile to my face. I have never hit big pace on any groundstroke ... although I have made decent progress with fh as a senior (go figure). But when everything clicks just right on 2hbh, I would at least call it semi-big pace 8-B. I am talking fairly flat drives.

Here are the elements that are required for me ... pretty much in order:

- my max unit turn, show some back to the net, feel the stretch behind right shoulder and in back
- as always, 2hbh has to be relaxed from unit turn through follow through
- closed stance ... I hit a lot more semi open stance 2hbhs now then when I started with 2hbh, and my game is better for it. BUT ... for my max 2hbh ... closed stance
- timing of jumping on swing with left arm is critical. Since closed, drop/loop happens while stepping, and left arm fired with full weight on right leg ... fire too early ... weak tea, too late ... weak tea
- snapping wrists ... both hands working together to really snap the racquet lag to contact. I know ... active relaxed hands ... we are suppose to be passive. Don't shoot the messenger ... just saying what brings out the screamer 2hbh for me. One other thing ... I always though the lag and racquet head drop was only for topspin. I saw what the pros were doing early (Nishikori extreme example) and said ... no ... I have bigger issues to become low 2hbh UE. Which was true ... but I have now revisited and added it. 2hbh lag is not just for topspin, easy pace booster timed correctly. Not saying it's a wise choice for a rec player ... Hewitt was pretty good :p without 2hbh lag.

Now ... if they would just go in. :eek:
 
#38
@Richboi where are you from? Just curious. I'm in SF if nearby let's hit!

I am practicing both 2hbh and 1hbh, the principle is similar. I believe depends on how you usually grip your backhand, I'm a lefty so I need to mirror my grip to fit yours.

To have a steady contact and pace, based on what I saw so far and my experience, maybe you are already doing all of the points below
1. make sure you don't grip it loosely, grip it so both of your palms feels your racquet handles feels most of your palm.
2. make sure you move forward when swinging, not moving backwards
3. you have chicken wing when you swing your backhand, that means you are not griping it tight or maybe another word is "optimally", therefore you don't feel the need to straighten up your arm when you hit. Straightening up will also be natural if you grip it optimally. This helps with plowthrough and consistency.

Hope it helps.
 
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