Useless information thread

Discussion in 'Odds & Ends' started by forzainter, Oct 17, 2007.

  1. Mike Bulgakov

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    CNN just aired a show about the financial dark side of modeling except for the top few. It reminded me of a Swedish woman I dated in the early 1990s. She was recruited by an agency from a small town in Sweden when she was sixteen, and sent to an agency residence in Paris. In her words, they were expected to party with rich guys. I met her when she was eighteen, and she only wanted to go home.
     
  2. Mike Bulgakov

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    The splinter groups from PIRA, largely forgotten in time, are now mostly involved in organized crime. Both sides of the 1960s-1990s sectarian divide have long been involved in crime, such as drug trafficking, but the criminal elements of these groups became protected by intelligence services in exchange for information about the political and terrorist realms of these organizations. This is how the world works all over.
     
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    [​IMG]

    The Origin of the Potato
    The potato was first cultivated in South America between three and seven thousand years ago, though scientists believe they may have grown wild in the region as long as 13,000 years ago. The genetic patterns of potato distribution indicate that the potato probably originated in the mountainous west-central region of the continent. According to Dr. Hector Flores, "the most probable place of origin of potatoes is located between the south of Peru and the northeast of Bolivia. The archaeological remains date from 400bc and have been found on the shores of Lake Titicaca.... There are many expressions of the extended use of the potato in the pre-Inca cultures from the Peruvian Andes, as you can see in the Nazca and Chimu pottery." The crop diffused from Peru to the rest of the Andes and beyond.

    Early Spanish chroniclers — who misused the Indian word batata (sweet potato) as the name for the potato — noted the importance of the tuber to the Incan Empire. The Incas had learned to preserve the potato for storage by dehydrating and mashing potatoes into a substance called chuñu. Chuñu could be stored in a room for up to 10 years, providing excellent insurance against possible crop failures. As well as using the food as a staple crop, the Incas thought potatoes made childbirth easier and used it to treat injuries.

    The Potato's Introduction
    The Spanish conquistadors first encountered the potato when they arrived in Peru in 1532 in search of gold, and noted Inca miners eating chuñu. At the time the Spaniards failed to realize that the potato represented a far more important treasure than either silver or gold, but they did gradually begin to use potatoes as basic rations aboard their ships. After the arrival of the potato in Spain in 1570, a few Spanish farmers began to cultivate them on a small scale, mostly as food for livestock.

    From Spain, potatoes slowly spread to Italy and other European countries during the late 1500s. By 1600, the potato had entered Spain, Italy, Austria, Belgium, Holland, France, Switzerland, England, Germany, Portugal and Ireland. But it did not receive a warm welcome.

    Throughout Europe, potatoes were regarded with suspicion, distaste and fear. Generally considered to be unfit for human consumption, they were used only as animal fodder and sustenance for the starving. In northern Europe, potatoes were primarily grown in botanical gardens as an exotic novelty. Even peasants refused to eat from a plant that produced ugly, misshapen tubers and that had come from a heathen civilization. Some felt that the potato plant's resemblance to plants in the nightshade family hinted that it was the creation of witches or devils.

    Let Them Eat Potatoes
    In most of Europe, the upper classes saw the potato's potential before the more superstitious lower classes, and the encouragement to begin growing potatoes had to come from above.

    In meat-loving England, farmers and urban workers regarded potatoes with extreme distaste. In 1662, the Royal Society recommended the cultivation of the tuber to the English government and the nation, but this recommendation had little impact. Potatoes did not become a staple until, during the food shortages associated with the Revolutionary Wars, the English government began to officially encourage potato cultivation. In 1795, the Board of Agriculture issued a pamphlet entitled "Hints Respecting the Culture and Use of Potatoes"; this was followed shortly by pro-potato editorials and potato recipes in The Times. Gradually, the lower classes began to follow the lead of the upper classes.

    A similar pattern emerged across the English Channel in the Netherlands, Belgium and France. While the potato slowly gained ground in eastern France (where it was often the only crop remaining after marauding soldiers plundered wheat fields and vineyards), it did not achieve widespread acceptance until the late 1700s. The peasants remained suspicious, in spite of a 1771 paper from the Faculté de Paris testifying that the potato was not harmful but beneficial. The people began to overcome their distaste when the plant received the royal seal of approval: Louis XVI began to sport a potato flower in his buttonhole, and Marie-Antoinette wore the purple potato blossom in her hair.

    Frederick the Great of Prussia saw the potato's potential to help feed his nation and lower the price of bread, but faced the challenge of overcoming the people's prejudice against the plant. When he issued a 1774 order for his subjects to grow potatoes as protection against famine, the town of Kolberg replied: "The things have neither smell nor taste, not even the dogs will eat them, so what use are they to us?" Trying a less direct approach to encourage his subjects to begin planting potatoes, Frederick used a bit of reverse psychology: he planted a royal field of potato plants and stationed a heavy guard to protect this field from thieves. Nearby peasants naturally assumed that anything worth guarding was worth stealing, and so snuck into the field and snatched the plants for their home gardens. Of course, this was entirely in line with Frederick's wishes.

    In the Russian Empire, Catherine the Great ordered her subjects to begin cultivating the tuber, but many ignored this order. They were supported in this dissension by the Orthodox Church, which argued that potatoes were suspect because they were not mentioned in the Bible. Potatoes were not widely cultivated in Russia until 1850, when Czar Nicholas I began to enforce Catherine's order.

    Across the Atlantic, the tuber was first introduced to the colonies in the 1620s when the British governor of the Bahamas sent a gift box of Solanum tuberosum to the governor of the colony of Virginia. While they spread throughout the northern colonies in limited quantities, potatoes did not become widely accepted until they received an aristocratic seal of approval from Thomas Jefferson, who served them to guests at the White House. Thereafter, the potato steadily gained in popularity, this popularity being strengthened by a steady stream of Irish immigrants to the new nation.
    http://www.history-magazine.com/potato.html
     
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  4. Mike Bulgakov

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    Understanding Russia's Obsession With Mayonnaise
    Nov. 28 2014 15:36 Last edited 15:36

    By Maeve Shearlaw for the Guardian New East Network

    On a crisp autumn night in central London a group have gathered to discuss an age-old Russian affair: A shared love of mayonnaise.

    The crowd is dominated by Russian expats living in London. The venue is Pushkin House, set up in the 1950s as meeting place for all of those interested in the country's culture.

    So is the ubiquitous condiment really that popular? An emphatic yes from (almost) everyone present.

    Mayonnaise was introduced to imperialist Russia at the turn of the 20th century and it remained a stalwart throughout Soviet times. Mass-produced and durable, it was everywhere — from workers canteens to households that didn't have an abundance of fresh food. Today the average Russian consumes 2.5 kilograms a year, using it as everything from a salad dressing to a bread spread.

    The evening is chaired by Karina Baldry, who says she loves "everything to do with emulsified eggs." Baldry explains that culinary life when she was growing up was all about tins and jars with an occasional bit of salami. You could only get certain foods if you had the right connections. Mayonnaise was only "randomly available in the 1990s, so I bought up all the stock I could find." Did anyone ever make it? No, they really liked the jars, she says.

    Baldry only realized how zealous she was when she married a British man who failed to share her passion — although she insists that her food is never "swimming in it" just "lightly dressed."

    Her co-chair, Jennifer Eremeyeva, is an American who married a Russian while living in Moscow in the 1990s. She say she became interested in food because "it was one of the only things about Russia I could control." She now runs a blog about Russian life, majoring on food and culture.

    Eremeyeva went to Russia in 1978 and witnessed the food scene change after the fall of the Soviet Union. There was excitement about grapefruits and Baskin Robbins. More recently sushi became the rage, now even low-fat products are widely available, she says.

    She's not so sure about the need for mayonnaise with everything.

    "I like it but it has its places, in sandwiches ... not to hide flavors or as a dish lubricant," she says. Egg mayonnaise, tuna sandwiches or potato salad — OK. In soup, on fried eggs, or as a marinade — not OK, she writes on her blog.

    "Food is great way in to a culture," says Eremeyeva, paying tribute to the "Slavic soul of hospitality." When someone cooks you a dish "it's like someone is inviting you into their house and asking you to put on their slippers," she adds.

    The evening, organized by post-Soviet food enthusiasts Russian Revels, explores many aspects of Russian life — just not politics. The discussion briefly touches on the sanctions imposed by the Kremlin in August in responses to international sanctions over Russia's role in the violence in Ukraine: There is talk of supermarket shelves stocked with "Belarussian mussels" — despite the country being landlocked — and "Siberian mozzarella". Some think sanctions will be the death knell for the foodie culture, others think they will allow Russian producers to come into their own.

    Talk quickly turns to shuba, a Russian speciality otherwise known as "herring under a fur coat" — a layered salad of pickled herring, hard boiled eggs, potatoes, beetroot, carrots and onions with mayonnaise squirted liberally throughout.

    Eremeyeva denounces the dish as "a culinary crime … a metaphor for everything that's wrong with Russia," triggering a round of (lighthearted) boos. "Beets and herring shouldn't go together," she says. But she is very much in the minority.

    This prompts others to share their mayonnaise crimes: Kate Chernyshov, a Brit who lived in Russia in the early 90s, described going to a friend and being served a meal of Brussels sprouts and mayonnaise. Eremeyeva shared her mother-in-law's specialty dish— "French meat"— which involved slathering meat in mayo and baking it for hours.

    But for every crime someone claims a culinary triumph. Alexei Evstafiev, a Russian who has lived in London for eight years, outlines his mother's recipe for spit roasted chicken. The secret? A coating of mayonnaise. Baldry adds it when baking biscuits or chocolate cake; she also puts it in soup. Ukrainian Oksana Dmitriyeva, who has been in living in Britain for 14 years, says she likes to mix mayonnaise with sour cream as a dressing or add to fried liver to soften it up.

    Mayonnaise is not the only fixture of Russian cuisine under discussion. Soup is also a highly protected craft which, according to tradition, should only be blended if the person eating it is ill. And of course there's dill — which Russians seem to love above all else.

    Expats living in Russia have suffered so severely from its overuse that they have set up a Facebook group, DillWatch, which has more than 1,000 members who share pictures of "inappropriate" uses of dill.
    http://www.themoscowtimes.com/article/512011.html
     
  5. stringertom

    stringertom Bionic Poster

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    If you Google search the definition for askew the result is tilted slightly to the right. I am disappoint my Google search for Sureshs was not in any way
    askew.:p
     
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  6. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

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    When I once Google-searched for "suresh", my computer screen emanated a strong methane odour, and i had to kill the browser to stop my laptop from exploding. Google search is THAT good.

    Or maybe Apple laptops just aren't sureshs-proof.
     
  7. Sentinel

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    Cassini Seeks Insights to Life in Plumes of Enceladus, Saturn’s Icy Moon

    http://www.nytimes.com/2015/10/29/s...ns-moon-enceladus-cassini-hunts-for-life.html

    http://graphics8.nytimes.com/video/players/offsite/index.html?videoId=100000004003105

    ....

    But in 2005, shortly after starting an 11-year sojourn at Saturn, Cassini recorded jets of water squirting from cracks known as tiger stripes near the south pole of Enceladus — evidence, scientists say, of an underground ocean kept warm and liquid by tidal flexing of the little moon as it is stretched and squeezed by Saturn.

    And with that, Enceladus leapfrogged to the top of astrobiologists’ list of promising places to look for life. If there is life in its ocean, alien microbes could be riding those geysers out into space where a passing spacecraft could grab them. No need to drill through miles of ice or dig up rocks.

    As Chris McKay, an astrobiologist at NASA’s Ames Research Center, said, it’s as if nature had hung up a sign at Enceladus saying “Free Samples.”
     
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  8. Mike Bulgakov

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    The social obligation in the U.S. to hand out candy to strange kids in costumes on Halloween is annoying.
     
  9. Mike Bulgakov

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    [​IMG]
    THE IRISH COFFEE STORY

    The historic venture started on the night of November the 10th in 1952. Jack Koeppler, then-owner of the Buena Vista, challenged international travel writer Stanton Delaplane to help re-create a highly touted "Irish Coffee" served at Shannon Airport in Ireland. Intrigued, Stan Accepted Jack’s invitation, and the pair began to experiment immediately.

    Throughout the night the two of them stirred and sipped judiciously and eventually acknowledged two recurring problems. The taste was "not quite right," and the cream would not float. Stan’s hopes sank like the cream, but Jack was undaunted. The restaurateur pursued the elusive elixir with religious fervor, even making a pilgrimage overseas to Shannon Airport.

    Upon Jack’s return, the experimentation continued. Finally, the perfect-tasting Irish whiskey was selected. Then the problem of the bottom-bent cream was taken to San Francisco’s mayor, a prominent dairy owner. It was discovered that when the cream was aged for 48 hours and frothed to a precise consistency, it would float as delicately as a swan on the surface of Jack’s and Stan’s special nectar.

    Success was theirs! With the recipe now mastered, a sparkling clear, six-ounce, heat-treated goblet was chosen as a suitable chalice.

    Soon the fame of the Buena Vista’s Irish Coffee spread throughout the land. Today, it’s still the same delicious mixture, and it’s still the same clamorous, cosmopolitan Buena Vista. Both…delightful experiences.
    http://www.thebuenavista.com/home/irishcoffee.html
    [​IMG]
     
  10. Mike Bulgakov

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    The lure of the Honey Trap
    Gabrielle Monaghan on how the powerful, including a British minister, can fall for an ancient bait

    Gabrielle Monaghan
    PUBLISHED
    02/10/2014 | 02:30

    Brooks Newmark, the British minister who resigned at the weekend after sending lewd photographs to a fictional Tory PR girl who flirted with him on Twitter, is the latest in a long line of men to risk their status, power or wealth to a carefully bated honey trap.

    In the era of social media, the honey trap doesn't even have to be real. Indeed, "Sophie Wittams", the young woman who flattered Newmark on Twitter, was the creation of a male freelance reporter working for the Sunday Mirror.

    The reporter had used a photograph of a Swedish model called Malin Sahlén to lure in the Conservative minister, without Sahlén's knowledge. Wittams convinced the 56-year-old to swap numbers and share explicit photos of himself.

    During his resignation on Saturday, ahead of the Sunday Mirror's revelations from its sting operation, Newmark said: "I have been a complete fool. I have no one to blame but myself."

    Newmark is not the first man to fall for a honey trap and won't be the last. Exploiting a male weakness for beautiful women is as old as human relations itself, from Cleopatra luring Julius Caesar to solidify her grip on the throne to biblical figure Delilah betraying Samson by allowing the Philistines to cut off his hair as he slept.

    Femme fatales have been a key feature of espionage for centuries. Here are some of the most famous.

    Anna Chapman

    The redhead was one of 10 Russian sleeper agents deported from America in 2010 after being arrested and accused of spying for the SVR, Russia's foreign intelligence agency.

    A series of Facebook photos of Chapman released after her arrest transformed the beauty into a celebrity. She and the other spies were exchanged, Cold War-style, on the runway of Vienna airport for four individuals convicted in Russia for espionage. The story served as an inspiration for The Americans, the television show about Soviet sleeper agents in the 1980s.

    Chapman was greeted back in Russia by Vladimir Putin, given state honours, and became a household name. She dabbled in Russian politics, posed for mens' magazines and set up her own fashion brand.

    In 2012, Frank Figliuzzi, the FBI's assistant director of counter-intelligence, said Chapman's handlers at the SVR had intended her to be a "honeytrap" and that she had got "closer and closer to higher and higher ranking leadership". He said one of the main reasons the FBI swooped on the Russian agents was a fear that Chapman would ensnare a member of the Obama administration.

    Christine Keeler

    Britain's MI5 intelligence service successfully dangled the British showgirl in front of the Russian naval attaché Yevgeni Ivanov in 1961. But Keeler was also having an affair with John Profumo, the British secretary of war, who spotted her at a summer party while she was swimming naked in a pool.

    Profumo broke off the affair under the instruction of MI5. After he emphatically denied the liaison in parliament, Keeler decided to sell his love letters to the Express newspaper. Profumo resigned, and Harold Macmillan's Conservative government crumbled.

    Cheryl Ben-Tov

    Born Cheryl Hanin in Florida, she moved to Israel as a teenager to study. After joining the army, she became an agent for the Mossad, the country's intelligence unit.

    In 1986, posing as an American tourist called "Cindy", she seduced former Israeli nuclear technician Mordechai Vanunu, who had decided to reveal details of the country's nuclear weapons programme to The Sunday Times.

    She convinced Vanunu to go with her to Rome, where other agents drugged and transported him to Israel to stand trial. He was sentenced to 18 years in prison, spending nearly 12 of them in solitary confinement.

    Mata Hari

    The Dutch exotic dancer and courtesan was executed by firing squad in France after being convicted of spying for Germany during World War I and causing the deaths of up to 50,000 French soldiers.

    She was said to have had relationships with high-ranking officials and politicians. As a neutral Dutch national, she could travel freely across a Europe at war. She was accused of passing secrets from Allied officers and officials to the Germans, but, after the war, French and British intelligence admitted they had no real case against her.

    The Cold War's male honey traps

    Honey traps are not just set by women seeking to exploit male admirers.

    During the Cold War, the Stasi perfected the male equivalent. "Romeo" agents were dispatched by the East German intelligence service to pick up female secretaries working for powerful men in West Germany in organisations such as Nato.

    After World War Two, there were far more women than men in West Germany. The "Romeo" spies would ingratiate themselves with single secretaries and, in some cases, escalate the relationship by proposing marriage. After tying the knot, the "Romeo" would admit to his wife that he was a spy for a friendly country.

    The final touch was for the Romeo to tell his wife that he would be recalled by his government and the only thing that could save their relationship was for his wife to divulge information about her employer, thereby keeping his boss happy.

    By 1980, Nato had started compiling and monitoring a registry of single female secretaries to make sure they were not marrying East German spies.

    Irish Independent
    http://www.independent.ie/life/the-lure-of-the-honey-trap-30627840.html
     
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  11. Mike Bulgakov

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    It would be undignified to be found passed out on a stranger's lawn, in an unfamiliar part of the city the morning after Halloween, still drunk and dressed as Dracula.
     
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  12. Sentinel

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  13. stringertom

    stringertom Bionic Poster

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  14. Rock Strongo

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    I inadvertently made a very good drink to a patron at the bar today. She wanted a drink with Passõa but without any juice in it. 40ml of Passõa, 20ml of vodka and up to half of the glass with sour mix/lemon juice. Shake and then fill up the rest with Sprite/7-Up.
     
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  15. Sentinel

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    That goes without saying. The astronomers are just trying to be a little appreciative of lesser planets, of course no one can rival sUranus' double crescent :D
     
  16. SoBad

    SoBad G.O.A.T.

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    With most women, you just need to make it fruity and sweet, give them some male attention, and they’re good to go.

    And good job sneaking in lemon juice despite her request for no juice!:D
     
  17. SoBad

    SoBad G.O.A.T.

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    Interesting -- would have never guessed that potatoes were introduced this recently (mere centuries) into the major civilizations.
     
  18. SoBad

    SoBad G.O.A.T.

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    Can you not claim exemption from this obligation by refraining from putting a lit pumpkin by the door?
     
  19. SoBad

    SoBad G.O.A.T.

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    This pathetic CIA mouthpiece can’t even run a food op-ed without injecting some anti-Putin hysteria (“international” sanctions?:rolleyes:). Or perhaps that was the main purpose of this article.

    Amazing how this garbage yellow tabloid continues to operate with impunity under all the alleged freedom of press crackdowns.
     
  20. SoBad

    SoBad G.O.A.T.

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    The basic instincts are the most powerful, aren’t they. As for clandestine operations that the public gets to read about, I find those reports a bit dubious. Just how clandestine could they have possibly been?
     
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  21. Mike Bulgakov

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    The insulting remarks about dill were deeply hurtful and unnecessary.
     
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  22. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Hall of Fame

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    Obviously, the public only hears about covert and clandestine operations if something goes wrong, or if people reveal the operations later. In the case of East German operations, huge stores of files were revealed and made public after the collapse of the Soviet Union.

    These operations are very common and rarely made public. During the Cold War, people in the know say Russians were far better, and more sophisticated, with these tactics than the Americans. Currently, China is making extensive use of seduction for a variety of reasons.
     
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  23. stringertom

    stringertom Bionic Poster

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  24. Vcore89

    Vcore89 Legend

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    Well Done Rodge, Congratulations!

    Up next, a seventh World Tour Finals.
     
  25. SoBad

    SoBad G.O.A.T.

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    If we are holding an idiocy contest for quotes from the article, forget dill and Putin. I nominate “Beets and herring shouldn't go together” as the runner-up, but the gold medal goes to:

    “Soup is also a highly protected craft which, according to tradition, should only be blended if the person eating it is ill.”
     
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  26. Mike Bulgakov

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    Petra Kvitova often flips off balls she doesn't like.
    [​IMG]
     
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  27. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Hall of Fame

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    Yes, the woman who wrote the article made several daft remarks. Traditionally, mushrooms were avoided by the British, so she likely has an unsophisticated palate.

    I was curious about how mayonnaise became so popular in Russia, especially during Soviet times. That article was near the top of the results when I did a search on Google. Personally, I much prefer sour cream.

    Here is another important article dealing with the issue of mayonnaise in Russia:

    Traditional Russian dishes are not spicy. Why we do not use pepper? And why do we use mayo, sour cream and dill in way too many dishes?
    Why Russian Food Is Not Spicy?

    There are two main reasons:

    a) We live in a cold country. Spicy foods are more typical for tropical countries than for cold northern countries, where there is no need to use antimicrobial properties of spices.

    b) Another reason Russian food is not spicy is that Russia does not grow most spices on its territory, so they always had to be imported. Russia was mainly an agricultural country, peasants did not have access to imported spices and their food was quite simple.

    Food preferences are shaped in the childhood.

    Since most Russians do not like spicy food, most ethnic restaurants in Moscow go light on spices or the waiter will ask you, how spicy you want your dishes to be. I usually opt for spicy, since I like spicy food, but it will still never be too hot. From my personal example – I think that tolerance to spices is something you acquire in your childhood. Food in our house was not spicy when I grew up, but when I was a kid, we lived in Kenya where there was a big Indian population and, as a result, I could enjoy spicy samosas etc. Since I had been exposed to spicy Indian food, now I can eat (and enjoy) even a very spicy Indian dishes, but have lower tolerance to spicy Mexican food .

    What Is The Typical Russian Cuisine?

    Traditional way of cooking food in ancient Russia was to cook dishes in clay oven (which usually was the center of the house and served as a heater). Food was cooked in gorshki (clay pots), main food was a soup (most typical – schi – made of meat and cabbage and grains or potatoes. Pies were also very popular and baked in the oven. Even now, oven-cooking is central for the majority of dishes.

    The most popular condiments used for making food less bland in Russia are salt and black pepper (always used in moderation). Salt is also widely used for conserving food for winter – mushrooms, cucumbers, tomatoes etc. Almost any Russian kitchen will have bay leaf, no soup goes without it. Russians like to use a lot of herbs, most popular one is dill. Dill is part of the salads, dill is on top of boiled potatoes, dill is added to the soups. We love dill and add it to so many dishes, it drives foreigners mad. We also use parsley and cilantro, but not as much.

    Our food is rich on onions and garlic. However, we do not have any traditional recipes, where onion or garlic would be a main ingredient (like French onion soup or Czech garlic soup). Onions are typically minced and fried and added to dishes and garlic is used either diced and raw as part of salads or to enhance a flavor of meat or vegetable stews.

    Why Do Russians Love Sour Cream And Mayo?

    Sour cream was used in Russia since ancient times. Sour cream is a product, made from cream. It is high on fat, but is quite healthy despite that and is easily digested even for lactose intolerant people. Why do we need to add more fats to our dishes? Again, living in a cold country calls for more nutritious food. Sour cream is definitely more healthy than butter. Sour cream is typically used as a sauce for salads, it makes all traditional soups (schi, borsch, okroshka, mushroom soup etc.) taste better, it tastes great with boiled potatoes and million other dishes.

    Do not let this dollop of salad fool you. I recreated the restaurant serving of Russian salad in my kitchen… but the usual portion is several times bigger
    When it comes to Mayo – things get more complicated. Mayonnaise is a sauce that came to Russia from French cuisine. It all makes sense. Our most “Russian” salad was designed by the French Chef Olivier. Fresh mayonnaise is made from olive oil and yolks, it is very high on fat content, but in the French cuisine it was not meant to be eaten in large quantities.

    How Russians Use Mayo?

    Here is where things get scary. Russians use mayo in industrial quantities. Usually this sauce is not prepared at home, people use store-brands. Most typical variety is Mayonnaise Provençal, 67% fat content. Mayo used to be expensive long time ago, then it was part of deficit products during Soviet times, now it is really cheap and widely available.

    People add mayo to most salads, a lot of people use mayo as sauce for all main courses and instead of sour cream for soups.

    But the most scary use is dishes baked under the coat of mayo. Meat, fish, chicken, veggies – all gets more tasty under the thick coat of mayo (even if the ingredients are of sub-par quality). One of the most popular main courses of the 90s is “Meat French style” – meat, baked under the coat of mayo AND cheese.

    There are several hugely popular food blogs, devoted to cooking with mayo. Any ingredient that you could think of is represented there. And presentation of the dishes is often very elaborate.

    Fried mayo, no kidding
    But the apotheosis of mayo-related cuisine is… fried mayo! Yes, you can fry that stuff! Just freeze it, make a ball, using ice-cream spoon, coat with breadcrumbs and deep-fry in heated oil!
    http://understandrussia.com/mayo-sour-cream-and-dill/
     
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  28. r2473

    r2473 Legend

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    Interesting
     
  29. stringertom

    stringertom Bionic Poster

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    My "bank" I'll start with tomorrow is $88.!
     
  30. SoBad

    SoBad G.O.A.T.

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    Thanks, this is a nicer write up, although I must say that drawing generalizations about food in the “Soviet times” doesn’t make much sense. We’re talking hundreds of millions of people across a dozen time zones over 7 decades. Surely there must have been some variation.

    Fully agree on:

    “a) We live in a cold country. Spicy foods are more typical for tropical countries than for cold northern countries, where there is no need to use antimicrobial properties of spices.”

    I think I have made a comment to similar effect recently about spices and climates.

    Why did mayo become popular? I would guess the simplicity, practicality, and calorie richness. Cold climate, vast landlocked lands, you have to keep things simple and practical in the countryside.

    Onion, garlic, dill in every form definitely true.

    Sour cream true. The variety of fermented milk products in the country is only surpassed by the range of preserved pork products.

    As for fried mayo, I find the topic controversial.
     
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  31. stringertom

    stringertom Bionic Poster

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    I ate at Subway for the first time in a year or so...it was National Sandwich Day so I got a second sub for free for later on.

    Still prefer Wawa!
     
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  32. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Hall of Fame

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    I often crave smørrebrød.
    [​IMG]
     
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  33. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Hall of Fame

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    I am currently snacking on wasabi edamame. Wasabi is closely related to horseradish, and produces the sensation of heat largely through the nasal passage.
     
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  34. stringertom

    stringertom Bionic Poster

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    I would like to try fried mayo as a condiment for some of the more controversial topics you sometimes discuss. I think it might go well with our talk on why Evgeny constantly underperforms vs his talent and potential.:D
     
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  35. SoBad

    SoBad G.O.A.T.

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    Looks like a very nice and balanced presentation. Economically sound, as well: no overwhelment with exotic seafood there.
     
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  36. SoBad

    SoBad G.O.A.T.

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    Nothing controversial about the Safin-Donskoy debacle, as I see it. Coach owes player duty of care, simple as that.

    Heavy cooking, on the other hand, can be a tool, in the hand of an unscrupulous cook, to disguise ingredients of subpar quality. Fried mayo often raises a number of trust, morality, and cold storage issues.
     
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  37. SoBad

    SoBad G.O.A.T.

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    I’ve noticed that wasabi/mustard/ginger/ginseng type condiments, as well as garlic, lemon, alcohol, green tea, and high-mineral content carbonated water all help keep nose clear. I sometimes think of breathing as an important element of a healthy lifestyle.
     
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  38. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Hall of Fame

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  39. Vcore89

    Vcore89 Legend

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  40. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Hall of Fame

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    I had never heard of this, despite spending a lot of time in Denmark and trying pretty much every Carlsberg product, so I checked out the Carlsberg site. This product seems pretty funny, more a fashion accessory than a real beer. I wouldn't recommend ordering this at a Skagen biker bar.

    Copenhagen – A Danish beer with International appeal

    Carlsberg is ready to launch a beer with an international face. The Danes will be the first to taste Copenhagen, but the rest of the Carlsberg world will get its chance next year
    Copenhagen is the name of Carlsberg’s new beer and the first innovative offering for the new generation of beer drinkers who delight in the full package of design, taste and quality.

    The beer has a light, refreshing taste, while the design is rooted in Copenhagen as an international city of fashion and design. Copenhagen is intended for modern women and men, who appreciate a refreshing taste delivered in a stylish design.

    “We can see that there are a number of consumers, especially women, who are very aware of design when they choose beverage products. There may be situations where they are standing in a bar and want their drinks to match their style. In this case, they may well reject a beer if the design does not appeal to them," says Jeanette Elgaard Carlsson, International Innovation Director at Carlsberg. "The consumer surveys that we have conducted in Denmark show that 98% of the target group finds Copenhagen exciting."

    Carlsberg has sharpened its focus on innovation and the development of new products that can be sold throughout the world. Copenhagen is the first example of a new beer brand that is being rolled out globally. The beer, brand and design have all been developed by Carlsberg’s International Innovation Department in Copenhagen in collaboration with the Carlsberg Research Center.

    Copenhagen will first be launched in Denmark, and according to Kirsten Ægidius, VP Marketing, the Danish business is increasingly encountering consumers who are seeking alternatives to ordinary beer.

    "Many young people aren’t keen on the bitter aftertaste of beer. Here our surveys show that with Copenhagen we have created a highly drinkable beer with a balanced taste – a real alternative to white wine and champagne," she says.
    http://www.carlsberggroup.com/media...hagen–ADanishbeerwithInternationalappeal.aspx
     
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  41. Rusty Shackleford

    Rusty Shackleford Legend

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    Will be the rage among metroalcoholics.
     
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  42. Mike Bulgakov

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    People often don't understand the difference between covert and clandestine intelligence activities.
     
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  43. Mike Bulgakov

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    I prefer Reno to Las Vegas.
     
  44. Mike Bulgakov

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    The Gallagher brothers of Oasis were not very tall at all, and neither was Kate Moss for a supermodel. Have they grown since their 1990s daze?
     
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  45. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

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    I googled sureshs talk tennis and what did i get ...

    [​IMG]
     
  46. stringertom

    stringertom Bionic Poster

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    I googled Poobartoli and got my poast from the "Stan's Ugly Shorts" thread.
     
  47. Vcore89

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    Yet to see sureshs in pink and white chequered shorts!
     
  48. Mike Bulgakov

    Mike Bulgakov Hall of Fame

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    Poland has some nice exports.
    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
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  49. Firstservingman

    Firstservingman G.O.A.T.

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    Iridium in [IrO4]+ has an oxidation state of +9. :eek:

    I didn't even know that was possible.
     
  50. stringertom

    stringertom Bionic Poster

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    I just prayed for three people who hopped on a pedicab driven by an idiot who put a passenger in the hospital in an easily avoidable accident.:(
     

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