USTA Level ratings videos...

ChaelAZ

Legend
So I self rated myself at 3.0. I never played high school or in a league before. I just joined a flex league. The league is suppose to be a 3.5-4. Can you watch my video and rate me please. Honestly is the best!! I want to join league but I wanna be with the people in my proper group. Please and thank you!!

Hey Tito, thanks for posting. I think 3.0 is approriate. In AZ I jsut finished what was a high 3.5/4.0 Flex league and honestly most the guys would have won against you, BUTTTTT...don't let that stop you from the experience of the matches. Playing the better players will help you see where you need to improve.

Good thing is you have a dcent looking serve, which will keep you competitive with many 3.0/3.5 guys.

Have fun and good luck!
 
Hey Tito, thanks for posting. I think 3.0 is approriate. In AZ I jsut finished what was a high 3.5/4.0 Flex league and honestly most the guys would have won against you, BUTTTTT...don't let that stop you from the experience of the matches. Playing the better players will help you see where you need to improve.

Good thing is you have a dcent looking serve, which will keep you competitive with many 3.0/3.5 guys.

Have fun and good luck!

Thanks for your honest thoughts!! I like playing better players. Even tho they beat me I get to learn something from each match. I really need to fix my footwork
 

pastashop42

New User
IMO, which is worth exactly what you paid for it, if you played in college (D2-D1), you won’t drop below 5.0 even in old age. 5.5-6.0 most likely. If you were on varsity in high school and are still fast / fit, probably 4.5-5.0. Around here, a lot of dudes who used to be HS varsity are now in their 50s with a solid (busy) job, kids, and a bit of a belly, but can still hit a 100 mph serve and blast a return. They can’t run down every ball like the youngsters, so they play 4.0-4.5 level. They tend to play doubles most of the time, because... running hurts. And if you started playing after 15 or maaaybe 25 with lots of lessons, unless you’re a gifted natural athlete, it’s going to be awfully hard to go beyond 4.0 — a lot of motor / hand-eye stuff gets baked in before or around the time puberty hits.

But whatever! Play whatever level you want until you start winning more than 70% of the time, then move up. You should end up at around 50/50 win/lose. Otherwise, what’s the point?
 

ChaelAZ

Legend
The high schools around you must be insane...

Send them my way! I can provide free cheese wiz and Axe body spray, to sweeten the pot for transfering! I get the pay to play kids that never touched a racquet and only have ever skateboarded on a court!
 

pastashop42

New User
When I lived in CA 20 yrs ago, high school tennis was darn good. In some towns on the east coast and *******, the scene is surprisingly good... maybe 3 high schools out of 6-7 around town here have v. good teams that are competitive state-wide. And it’s a big college town, with 5-6 tennis clubs (!), so there are a lot of folks and coaches at all ages. Plus old duffers that used to be good, took time off to make something of themselves in life, now coming back to the game. So, there’s a range.

The interesting thing about tennis is that it’s actually difficult to play well regardless of the level of the player on the other side of the net. Most people play up or down with the “quality” of tennis coming from the other side. It’s mostly very composed and solid players that can maintain their style and level of play regardless.
 

navigator

Hall of Fame
IMO, which is worth exactly what you paid for it, if you played in college (D2-D1), you won’t drop below 5.0 even in old age. 5.5-6.0 most likely.
I think this depends on what level of college tennis you played within the division. I could play on a team in the bottom decile of D1 tennis today (because they suck); not a chance for a team in the top decile of D3 tennis. Most 50-ish guys who played fairly competitive college tennis and aren't too beat up are 4.5/5.0, but there are a ton of older former college players that are 4.5 and much below. There are very few over-50 5.5 level players period... pretty much only guys who made it to the ATP top-200 and avoided injury, which is a very small group.
 

Hmgraphite1

Hall of Fame
I think this depends on what level of college tennis you played within the division. I could play on a team in the bottom decile of D1 tennis today (because they suck); not a chance for a team in the top decile of D3 tennis. Most 50-ish guys who played fairly competitive college tennis and aren't too beat up are 4.5/5.0, but there are a ton of older former college players that are 4.5 and much below. There are very few over-50 5.5 level players period... pretty much only guys who made it to the ATP top-200 and avoided injury, which is a very small group.
Hey if you get to wNY next summer we'll play a match and video for ttw
 

FiReFTW

Legend
And if you started playing after 15 or maaaybe 25 with lots of lessons, unless you’re a gifted natural athlete, it’s going to be awfully hard to go beyond 4.0 — a lot of motor / hand-eye stuff gets baked in before or around the time puberty hits.
lol poor 12 year old kid from the other thread, looks like his time is running out, hes never going to reach utr13, based on this he will probably max out at utr8 in his lifetime lol
 
The 3.5 and 4.5 guys are on staff at National. I believe the 4.0 woman is too.

The 4.5 guy is in fact a computer rated 4.0 player.

Instead of showing people hitting drills or perhaps in addition there should be 5 minute videos of match play. And yes, the 3.5 woman makes far too many adjustment steps at the baseline to pass as a 3.5.
 
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J011yroger

Talk Tennis Guru
The 3.5 and 4.5 guys are on staff at National. I believe the 4.0 woman is too.

The 4.5 guy is in fact a computer rated 4.0 player.

Instead of showing people hitting drill or perhaps in addition there should be 5 minute videos of match play. And yes, the 3.5 woman makes far too many adjustment steps at the baseline to pass as a 3.5.
Idiots.

J
 
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