USTA National Junior Comment

Tom C

Rookie
Nathan Pasha said the following, "The one thing that I really notice about the Spanish system is that they really put more of an emphasis on movement, body position, shot selection and consistency. I feel like I’m starting to get a better sense of the way tennis should be played, and how the professionals play the game." Nathan has been with the USTA for a time but he didn't have a sense of the way tennis should be played nor did he know how the professional game is played. What is the USTA doing with these juniors? And, what is the USTA emphasizing during practice?
 

ChiefAce

Semi-Pro
Jose Higueras recently took over, I would imagine this is his influence. He has a huge emphasis on footwork and the spanish style of constructing points.
 

Tom C

Rookie
I'm sure, but Pasha and a # of other juniors are in Spain training and preparing for some professional tournaments. Higureas may have set up the trip but are we doing the wrong training in the states? Pasha's comments seem to indicate that.
 

tenniscp

Semi-Pro
I'm sure, but Pasha and a # of other juniors are in Spain training and preparing for some professional tournaments. Higureas may have set up the trip but are we doing the wrong training in the states? Pasha's comments seem to indicate that.

I think, Pasha was probably commenting on the fact that point construction on a clay court is a bit different from that of the hard court. Since most of our juniors, even on that level, spend 70=80% of their time playing and competing on hard courts, it takes some time to get used to the mentality and the physicality of staying and playing or constructing points on clay.

I am pretty sure our boys are very talented and have a lot to offer, but let's face it, the Spaniards and Argentines or other Latin Americans are far better on dirt than we are. I do not know what is wrong or not with training in US, but why not learn from the best and keep an open mind. Is not that the reason why those boys were chosen to go to Europe and grow through this experience.
 
K

kctennis1005

Guest
I think, Pasha was probably commenting on the fact that point construction on a clay court is a bit different from that of the hard court. Since most of our juniors, even on that level, spend 70=80% of their time playing and competing on hard courts, it takes some time to get used to the mentality and the physicality of staying and playing or constructing points on clay.

I am pretty sure our boys are very talented and have a lot to offer, but let's face it, the Spaniards and Argentines or other Latin Americans are far better on dirt than we are. I do not know what is wrong or not with training in US, but why not learn from the best and keep an open mind. Is not that the reason why those boys were chosen to go to Europe and grow through this experience.

pasha won 16s clay courts this yr
 

Tom C

Rookie
I understand that clay is the new trend/fad but if the USTA knows this wouldn't the USTA have the kids play on clay more often and if they do why hasn't Pasha had this type of revelation/reaction beforehand? Doesn't anybody find it a lil strange (or sad or typical) that within 5 hours of being on the courts in Spain, Pasha makes these comments? Pasha has been with The USTA for 7+ months and now he feels "a better sense of the way tennis should be played, and how the professionals play the game."
 
I understand that clay is the new trend/fad but if the USTA knows this wouldn't the USTA have the kids play on clay more often and if they do why hasn't Pasha had this type of revelation/reaction beforehand? Doesn't anybody find it a lil strange (or sad or typical) that within 5 hours of being on the courts in Spain, Pasha makes these comments? Pasha has been with The USTA for 7+ months and now he feels "a better sense of the way tennis should be played, and how the professionals play the game."

this is the same ole story we have alot of guys coaching who played the game but nontheless dont understand how to teach it or understand the dynamics of it..like I said before I'll always trust a rocket scientist to guide me on how to fix a rocket rather than an astronaut. Mr Tom this is why we are very careful with our kid on whos coaching him.
 

LSStringing

Rookie
I think some people are taking Nathan's words a little TOO seriously. I think he was excited to be there, with the USTA coaches, training in Spain. He was trying to let everyone know that this was going to be a good learning experience for the whole team.

It is true that the Americans do not spend enough time on clay, BUT Jose is going to change that. His job is to catch US up to the South American dirt ballers...because we are currently behind. JH is a good choice for the USTA.

Nathan sent me an email on his second day there and he is the kind of kid that does a really good job giving someone detail about his daily excursions. I think that maybe you guys are taking his words out of context. He is incredibly smart on clay, but he is learning more every day on the dirt.
 
I think some people are taking Nathan's words a little TOO seriously. I think he was excited to be there, with the USTA coaches, training in Spain. He was trying to let everyone know that this was going to be a good learning experience for the whole team.

It is true that the Americans do not spend enough time on clay, BUT Jose is going to change that. His job is to catch US up to the South American dirt ballers...because we are currently behind. JH is a good choice for the USTA.

Nathan sent me an email on his second day there and he is the kind of kid that does a really good job giving someone detail about his daily excursions. I think that maybe you guys are taking his words out of context. He is incredibly smart on clay, but he is learning more every day on the dirt.

LSS ive lived across the street from the HP in Carson for a few years and always had trouble trying to get any of the coaches to put my son on the dirt on a regular basis but with Jose there im hoping that will change will see!!
 

LSStringing

Rookie
We all know that the USTA has made some poor decisions regarding High Performance Juniors in the past...they have also made some good decisions. That is why we have 22 Americans in the top 250 on the ATP and 18 Americans in the top 250 on the WTA.
I personally think that Jose was a GREAT decision.
 

eeytennis

Semi-Pro
We all know that the USTA has made some poor decisions regarding High Performance Juniors in the past...they have also made some good decisions. That is why we have 22 Americans in the top 250 on the ATP and 18 Americans in the top 250 on the WTA.
I personally think that Jose was a GREAT decision.

Sure 22 Americans in the top 250...but when you really look at the rankings you have Roddick, Blake, Fish, and Querrey in the top 50...the first three only have a few years left...they are of an "older" tennis generation...Querrey is good but has some serious work to do (especially on his footwork) if he ever wants to crack the top 20. Most of the other guys in the top 250 are players who are likely to never make it into the top 50. Donald Young...simply not good enough or he's is burnt out...Scoville Jenkins...if he was going to make it he would have made it by now...there are also so many players ranked between 100 and 250 that are well past their prime...American tennis is looking bleak. Same on the WTA...once the Williams sisters leave who will we have?

American tennis is suffering and I think it's largely in part due to the fact that in the USA tennis is predominantly a middle-upper class sport. There are exceptions but most of the top juniors nowaday already come from money...who else is going to fund their travels, equipment, etc. Whereas in places like Serbia...you get three top 10 players coming from a worn torn and poor country and it makes me wonder if they just want it more? They have more incentive to get themselves out.
 

LSStringing

Rookie
I think that every year we do the same song and dance,
"What are we going to do when Mac and Jimbo are done?"
"What are we going to do when Pete and Andre retire?"
"What will happen to American tennis when Andy and James can no longer compete?"
Tennis becomes more international every day. We have to understand that. We will never dominate the way we once did...ask Australia about that.

On the girls side of tennis, we are going to be in a lot of trouble when the William's sisters stop playing.

Back to the original thread, I think that Jose is the right man for the job. We all know that Spain is throwing kids on the tour left and right. So where does he send our kids? Spain. Good call, Jose. Maybe they should spend a couple of weeks in France, too. They don't seem to be doing so bad...
 

SoCal10s

Hall of Fame
clay court bandwagon

ok let's everybody jump on the clay court bandwagon.. just because Rafa is the world's #1 ,clay court style tennis is now the IN thing. let's all train our kids to do what Nadal does because it must work..Yes? --- I don't buy it... clay court tennis works on clay and this is why Nadal took so long to be able to finally win a hard court slam... I"ve seen the USTA take over and train some excellent players,send them to Florida and practice on clay and now their winning game formula has disappeared ..High Performance Juniors will all get clay court training ,so what? how many clay court tournament are there? Is it always good to hit loopy topspin shots? if so then why is Nadal trying more to flattening out his shots.. maybe we're another few steps behind...
 

LSStringing

Rookie
I am not a fan of Rafa. I don't like the way he plays...BUT I am definitely aboard the clay court bandwagon. Jose, who has worked with Chang, Courier and Sampras (how many grand slams do we have here?) says that clay courts do this:
teaches players to think, create ad tactically respond to each point and match.
enhances the development of players' footwork, balance and dexterity.
develops skills necessary to succeed on a variety of surfaces.
strengthens muscles, limits injuries ad lengthens careers.
champions the core values of hard work, patience, strategy and endurance.

I was born and raised a serve and volleyer (my coach was South African). He never made me play the dirt. My first Futures event was in Manzanillo, Mexico. A kid 5 years younger than I beat the crap (0,1) out of me on the dirt. The kid had everything that Jose mentioned up above. If I had spent half my time on the dirt, I might still be playing. Bad knees and a hip that kills won't cut it anymore.
 

SoCal10s

Hall of Fame
I am not a fan of Rafa. I don't like the way he plays...BUT I am definitely aboard the clay court bandwagon. Jose, who has worked with Chang, Courier and Sampras (how many grand slams do we have here?) says that clay courts do this:
teaches players to think, create ad tactically respond to each point and match.
enhances the development of players' footwork, balance and dexterity.
develops skills necessary to succeed on a variety of surfaces.
strengthens muscles, limits injuries ad lengthens careers.
champions the core values of hard work, patience, strategy and endurance.

I was born and raised a serve and volleyer (my coach was South African). He never made me play the dirt. My first Futures event was in Manzanillo, Mexico. A kid 5 years younger than I beat the crap (0,1) out of me on the dirt. The kid had everything that Jose mentioned up above. If I had spent half my time on the dirt, I might still be playing. Bad knees and a hip that kills won't cut it anymore.

all the stuff you said about how clay court teaches ::
players to think, create ad tactically respond to each point and match.
enhances the development of players' footwork, balance and dexterity.
develops skills necessary to succeed on a variety of surfaces.
strengthens muscles, limits injuries ad lengthens careers.
champions the core values of hard work, patience, strategy and endurance"" I totally agree with that but a lot of the players I've seen come back with a loopy topspin shot that are killing them in advanced play..
and what you said about how a guy beat you on clay o,1 ,, I bet that you'll kill him on hard court with the serve and volley style... .
 
Top