USTA rating metric?

jlee0408

New User
Does USTA give higher ratings to the players who win playoff matches and districts matches? Or are these post regular season league matches given the same weight as a regular USTA Match?
 

schmke

Hall of Fame
They (playoff/sectionals/nationals matches) carry more weight in the year-end calculations.
 

J_R_B

Hall of Fame
Does USTA give higher ratings to the players who win playoff matches and districts matches? Or are these post regular season league matches given the same weight as a regular USTA Match?
You seem to be asking two different things - do playoff matches generate higher ratings and do playoff matches get higher weight in the calculation? As Schmke said, the playoff matches do get higher weight.

As far as the rating itself, no difference is made in the calculation. It all depends on your rating, your partner's (in doubles), your opponents', and the final score. When you get to the playoffs, it's probably more likely that you'll face higher rated opponents, so, on the whole, I would think that playoff matches would generate higher actual ratings as well, but that's only because of the expected caliber of the competition, not because of any adjustment to the formula to do that. If you happen to run into a team that has low rated players on a court or two, the calculation very well could come out with a low rating, too.
 

CosmosMpower

Hall of Fame
You seem to be asking two different things - do playoff matches generate higher ratings and do playoff matches get higher weight in the calculation? As Schmke said, the playoff matches do get higher weight.

As far as the rating itself, no difference is made in the calculation. It all depends on your rating, your partner's (in doubles), your opponents', and the final score. When you get to the playoffs, it's probably more likely that you'll face higher rated opponents, so, on the whole, I would think that playoff matches would generate higher actual ratings as well, but that's only because of the expected caliber of the competition, not because of any adjustment to the formula to do that. If you happen to run into a team that has low rated players on a court or two, the calculation very well could come out with a low rating, too.
If how the rating is calculated doesn't change how is the higher weighting done?

If you tank in playoffs does that move your NTRP down much faster than tanking in regular season then? I played a guy at sectionals that was a UTR 5 like me and supposedly had a pretty decent record but I crushed him 1 and 0. He was at least 60 and could barely move and hit like a grandpa, honestly probably a 3.0 NTRP or 3.0 UTR I wonder if he was tanking.
 

J_R_B

Hall of Fame
If how the rating is calculated doesn't change how is the higher weighting done?

If you tank in playoffs does that move your NTRP down much faster than tanking in regular season then? I played a guy at sectionals that was a UTR 5 like me and supposedly had a pretty decent record but I crushed him 1 and 0. He was at least 60 and could barely move and hit like a grandpa, honestly probably a 3.0 NTRP or 3.0 UTR I wonder if he was tanking.
Individual match ratings are weighted in the calculation of your DNTRP rating. Just change the weighting of playoff matches.
 

OnTheLine

Hall of Fame
Yeah, I think this helped prevent a bump for me (among a few other individual matches) last year. Me and regular partner had beaten a pair 2X in regular season with scores something like 3s and 4s .... at districts, partner is nursing a twisted ankle and we lose 7-6; 7-5 to the SAME pair we had beaten multiple times. I would love to have that match back.
 

dizzlmcwizzl

Hall of Fame
I don't know if anyone knows what the actual formula is outside of the USTA … but in my mind I always figured that your year end rating was some type of average between your regular season dynamic rating and the ratings based just the results of your playoff matches. I believe the National USTA organization does some tweaking at the end to keep the sections equal as well. This probably is overly simplistic but should give you a idea.

However, for 3 years as a 4.0 I dominated the regular season and had so-so playoffs-stayed as a 4.0. The last year as a 4.0 I played well both in the regular season and the playoffs and then received the bump up. Seems to anecdotally support my premise.
 

ShaunS

Semi-Pro
dizzl, that's my basic understanding too.

However, for 3 years as a 4.0 I dominated the regular season and had so-so playoffs-stayed as a 4.0.
I suspect part of the confusion is because people don't know their opponents ratings. When you advance to playoffs, it's probably reasonable to assume that the player ratings are going to be on the higher end in a tighter grouping than normal league play. This would theoretically result in less deviation from the predicted results, and may also be part of the reason the USTA weights them more to make sure it's "impactful".

I came across a document a while ago (I think it's actually from 2008) that helped me get a much better picture of the whole rating system.

http://assets.usta.com/assets/558/Microsites/dps/usta_master/usta/doc/content/doc_90_106.pdf

It was prepared by a league coordinator. However, it is quite old and specific to a particular section. The general descriptions were helpful for me though.

And yeah, I don't think that anyone is sitting on the "formula" nor do I think it's simply enough to be represented in a paragraph. There's likely a relatively simple system for predicting outcomes for a single match, but when you get into the business of weighting, "smoothing" ratings across geographies, and all that stuff it's going to be much more complicated.

If someone wants to distract schmke, we could try to steal his notes... :D
 
Shaun, thank you for the link.
That document is one of the clearest attempts at educating the masses and not holding onto USTA secrets.
I fear the author was soon after fired for unwelcome transparency.
 
Top