[video] 5.5 vs. 4.5 lesson

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I'm speechless - I thought members here offered the best advice on the planet - (the best advice for the money you pay) !

Seriously though, I'm sure NYTA could discern between a good advice and bad one because is an advanced rec player. The bad advice only makes the advice giver look bad (sorry to state the obvious, your advice of not listening to others is definitely not a good one)
Losing weight as you get older and hitting/serving with a bit more pace to not prolong rallies is generic advice that can benefit most of us who are in our mid 40s. I don't see it as being specific to this match.

For this particular match, the only good advice would be to not read much into a game against someone much more skilled AND much younger, just like in the recent Shroud video. Name me one athletic sport where you play someone who is much younger and more skilled in a 1 on 1 match when you are in your mid 40s and gain any valuable lessons for future improvement? I know there is a person on this board who claims he gives high ranked juniors a run for their money, but most of us take that person's posts with a healthy dose of skepticism. If the skill level of the older player is much higher, then there is some chance. Else it is going to be a total mismatch. I've seen nyta's other videos and he looks fabulous when matched up against players close to his own age level.
 
Its hard to explain in words, 5 secs in person. I just move my contact point back 4-5 inches on balls above my shoulder. Little bit of cross over on high balls up the line if your early, they also curve up the middle.

Everyone is different though, worth a 2 shots, will know right away if its for you.
Ok, didn't realise you are talking about a ball above shoulder height.
 
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Chadillac

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Ok, didn't realise you are talking about a ball above shoulder height.
Ny is 5'4. With his knee bend and footwork he will see a lot of balls up there. Thats what made his kick returns so impressive to me.

But now that i think about it, i hit all up the line shots late and xcourts early, same stroke dif timing, makes it easy.

I think he is a great player, no longer discussing mechanics and stuff, all match play now. Just needs to take advantage of a few opportunities, another example is that lob point where he got jammed up on a shot up the middle. Should of won that one.
 
Ny is 5'4. With his knee bend and footwork he will see a lot of balls up there. Thats what made his kick returns so impressive to me.

But now that i think about it, i hit all up the line shots late and xcourts early, same stroke dif timing, makes it easy.

I think he is a great player, no longer discussing mechanics and stuff, all match play now. Just needs to take advantage of a few opportunities, another example is that lob point where he got jammed up on a shot up the middle. Should of won that one.
Your second para is dead on. Yes, the stroke is essentially the same for crosscourt and DTL, just a slightly different contact point. Because the racquet face will be pointing towards the court with a later contact while it will be more towards the diagonally opposite singles alley with an earlier contact.
 
Recently saw an tournament match where a much older and lower level player played a bigger/stronger/taller/younger/ higher level player that had a bigger serve, more spin, more experience against high level competition. He did about as well as he possibly could and got a few games. Not sure what NTRP the better guy is, but he won the tournament without losing a set and he straight-setted a guy who beat a d1 player in an earlier round.

What the older guy did:
  • use heavy, loopy topspin shots aimed at the backhand side
  • slice backhands with as much spin as possible
  • moved back further behind the baseline to give himself time to get a good swing
  • occasionally charged the net off the second serve
  • came into net as much as possible
  • had a great, positive attitude and had fun
  • hit drop shots
  • ran down every shot he could. never gave up on any point
  • moved his feet as much as possible
 
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Pointing out a flaw is almost meaningless.
Not at all. The first time it's pointed out, I might not even be aware I'm doing it. Being aware is the first step towards fixing it. So for me, pointing out a flaw is very meaningful.

As soon as the coach is gone, you will return to your old ways.
Which is why you video yourself doing it incorrectly and correctly so you have a baseline against which to compare.

It takes 20-30 hours of constant supervision and feedback for things to START to become ingrained.
This is the biggest thing people here simply do not get.
People do get it. They just disagree with your claim that it absolutely, positively, 100% has to be under a coach's supervision.

Your mileage may vary, but there is a reason the #1 player in the world has a coach.
There is a reason people train 6 days a week for YEARS, and pay $80k a year to IMG.
It's not for simple tips that can be found on youTube.
Those people have different goals than I do. If I wanted to play high division college ball and possibly even do more after that, sure that expenditure would be justified. But I just want to make it to the next level and am not willing to invest the same amount of time and $ as the above groups [total outliers relative to me].
 
This is the typical questionable advice this place is littered with, no offense.

Let's look at that point again starting at 2:50
1) 2:48 Kicker that goes over his head. He takes a full BH cut at it. Killer return that lands deep and forces a slice.
2) 2:52 Out of screen defensive BH that lands short (service line). Now, coach is in control. Slices it to corner on other side of court.
3) 2:55 Running FH that is driven high and deep. Great shot that puts opponent on the run, and forces a slice from the baseline. Short ball generated. NYTA is now in command. You're insane if you're calling this a bad FH.
4) 2:59 Angles it away. Coach is waiting for the CC FH. Coach runs it down. What are you going to do? CRUSH the ball here like a 3.5 spazz? No. Maybe drop shot, knowing coach is fast.
5) 3:04 lob return. When tired. Hits it deep and forces another slice.
6) 3:07 running FH. Since the ball arced up, he overruns and jams himself and hits it short. Point over. Of course his FH will suck here. This is not his real FH. He's totally jammed and too close.

So, which FH are you even talking about? 3? 4? 6?
None taken. What advice isn't questionable? I believe that was OPs point, it helps to question.

You're analyzing the flow of the point, I'm analyzing his mechanics. You're looking at current state, I'm looking at future state. In this particular rally he hits several clean forehands to look at. He hits effective shots with his current forehand, and in that point he hits two, I completely agree. Doesn't mean his mechanics are unimpeachable. I feel like his FH backswing could have more loop, start kinetic chain earlier, create more "whip", he can take that or leave it. IMO he still has a lot of arm in his FH. The jammed FH that breaks down illustrates this most vividly, under duress mechanical flaws are magnified. I think his super abbreviated takeback and mostly forward motion is going to impede developing more pace and/or spin, (as his coach is asking), because he can't build enough RHS in that compact of a motion.

Coach is a great player, but "brush up" is a remedial mantra, usually for beginning players learning the concept of topspin. Overly simplistic IMO, and I'm not sure how this gets NYTAs FH to 5.0, but maybe thinking "brush up" and practicing his current mechanics is that path. Totally possible. IMO usually smaller refinements and tweaks are required to breakthrough plateaus in technique. These are tough to identify, and tougher to change.
 
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Chadillac

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Coach is a great player, but "brush up" is a remedial mantra, usually for beginning players learning the concept of topspin. Overly simplistic IMO, and I'm not sure how this gets NYTAs FH to 5.0, but maybe thinking "brush up" and practicing his current mechanics is that path. Totally possible.
The coach just graduated from college and probably hasnt been teaching long.

The slice fh and drop shot are very disrespectful as a pro (unless asked for forward movement). You dont want your lesson to lose, you want them to hit great shots and win, not hack them up.

No one Ny faces is going to use a chip forehand as weapon unless its a serve return, found it to be unprofessional.

Hitting a tweener vs someone who is paying you? What is your goal here?
 
The coach just graduated from college and probably hasnt been teaching long.

The slice fh and drop shot are very disrespectful as a pro (unless asked for forward movement). You dont want your lesson to lose, you want them to hit great shots and win, not hack them up.

No one Ny faces is going to use a chip forehand as weapon unless its a serve return, found it to be unprofessional.

Hitting a tweener vs someone who is paying you? What is your goal here?
Idk, most of my coaches can and have hit tweeners as well as forehand slices. Depends on the student's goals, right? It's not a bad approach for training somebody to expect the unexpected in matchplay.
 
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Deleted member 23235

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The coach just graduated from college and probably hasnt been teaching long.

The slice fh and drop shot are very disrespectful as a pro (unless asked for forward movement). You dont want your lesson to lose, you want them to hit great shots and win, not hack them up.

No one Ny faces is going to use a chip forehand as weapon unless its a serve return, found it to be unprofessional.

Hitting a tweener vs someone who is paying you? What is your goal here?
i asked to play a "real set".
first set i got his B game, glympse of A
second set i got his C game

coach did say that playing sets against him is not going to help my game,...
but i still needed to see what it was like playing someone of his level.

what was not recorded was playing points where he was feeding me specific shots i was missing, and showing me how to handle them better
 
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None taken. What advice isn't questionable? I believe that was OPs point, it helps to question.

You're analyzing the flow of the point, I'm analyzing his mechanics. You're looking at current state, I'm looking at future state. In this particular rally he hits several clean forehands to look at. He hits effective shots with his current forehand, and in that point he hits two, I completely agree. Doesn't mean his mechanics are unimpeachable. I feel like his FH backswing could have more loop, start kinetic chain earlier, create more "whip", he can take that or leave it. IMO he still has a lot of arm in his FH. The jammed FH that breaks down illustrates this most vividly, under duress mechanical flaws are magnified. I think his super abbreviated takeback and mostly forward motion is going to impede developing more pace and/or spin, (as his coach is asking), because he can't build enough RHS in that compact of a motion.

Coach is a great player, but "brush up" is a remedial mantra, usually for beginning players learning the concept of topspin. Overly simplistic IMO, and I'm not sure how this gets NYTAs FH to 5.0, but maybe thinking "brush up" and practicing his current mechanics is that path. Totally possible. IMO usually smaller refinements and tweaks are required to breakthrough plateaus in technique. These are tough to identify, and tougher to change.
the "brush up" mantra was a reminder to me to focus on more "lag and snap", which i wasn't doing (enough) on both my fh and bh (especially)... so i disagree that it's a beginner concept (well unless you're saying i'm a beginner,... then i agree :p)

when i get tight i tend to have "stiff wrists" not allowing the racquet to lag back and snap forward.

bh side just feels awkward to exaggerate the lag and snap, but when i do, i get a ton more topspin, where i can now aim much higher over the net without fear of going long.

it also becomes a bit harder to time shots, which makes footwork that much more important, because in need to be driving/extending through the contact more with my body weight to maximize the chance of solid contact.

just to reiterate this was not your beginner "brush up" tip.

there was another thread about active or passive wrists... in a way it's about making the wrists passive enough so it will lag when you swing forward, but active at the right moment to "snap" (i know terrible word),... maybe "active release" is better,... forward to get more topspin. when i do it right/frequently, i get calluses on the outside base of my index fingers on both fh/bh side (see where nadal tapes)
 

atp2015

Hall of Fame
The coach just graduated from college and probably hasnt been teaching long.

The slice fh and drop shot are very disrespectful as a pro (unless asked for forward movement). You dont want your lesson to lose, you want them to hit great shots and win, not hack them up.

No one Ny faces is going to use a chip forehand as weapon unless its a serve return, found it to be unprofessional.

Hitting a tweener vs someone who is paying you? What is your goal here?
I agree, he looked a bit uncomfortable at times and had a quirky smile after hitting touch shots.

The other thing I couldn't fully understand is the choice of shots from NYTA - he was hitting CC or DTL when I was expecting he would do the opposite. The very first point on the video is an example - the first forehand DTL should have been CC for him to gain the positional advantage, but hits DTL and gets exposed on the BH side. He manages to run over to get deep BH, but hits another DTL and gives up an open court. I was expecting CC on both. The only explanation I think of is that NYTA was tired out at that point??
 
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I agree, he looked a bit uncomfortable at times and had a quirky smile after hitting touch shots.

The other thing I couldn't fully understand is the choice of shots from NYTA - he was hitting CC or DTL when I was expecting he would do the opposite. The very first point on the video is an example - the first forehand DTL should have been CC for him to gain the positional advantage, but hits DTL and gets exposed on the BH side. He manages to run over to get deep BH, but hits another DTL and gives up an open court. I was expecting CC on both. The only explanation I think of is that NYTA was tired out at that point??
Probably got too close to the ball and couldn't find the width to unload the cross court.
 
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I agree, he looked a bit uncomfortable at times and had a quirky smile after hitting touch shots.

The other thing I couldn't fully understand is the choice of shots from NYTA - he was hitting CC or DTL when I was expecting he would do the opposite. The very first point on the video is an example - the first forehand DTL should have been CC for him to gain the positional advantage, but hits DTL and gets exposed on the BH side. He manages to run over to get deep BH, but hits another DTL and gives up an open court. I was expecting CC on both. The only explanation I think of is that NYTA was tired out at that point??
first point...
*in the 1st set, he was *killing* me with his fh... basically anything fh, got me on the run (or outright winner dtl)... so i was going out of my way to hit to his bh (which was still very good, but not as good as his fh)... i didn't have enough depth pace to neutralize him.
*2nd bh dtl,... i was thinking approach shot... but didn't get it good enough

and yes, was definitely tired... so technique aside, probably not thinking straight either... but when i am, i usually follow wardlaws unless there's a clear weaker wing (that i think i can dominate - eg. bh)
 
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atp2015

Hall of Fame
Probably got too close to the ball and couldn't find the width to unload the cross court.
My first choice there (hitting forehand with opponent near deep ad court) would have been really short angle CC - would be a winner against a fellow 4/4.5.
IMO, the best thing when playing with someone at higher level is to stick to the conventional strategy based on your strength and not opponent's strength. BH is always going to be weaker relatively speaking, but is enough to do the damage if the court positioning principles are not followed. If you don't follow the 'rules', you will run side to side and still lose the point. If you follow the positioning 'rules', you may still lose because he has better shots but at least you will avoid side to side exasperated running. At 4.0 level, I have had success hitting CC (even if forehand) when the 'rules' dictate than going DTL when not appropriate. If not great passing shot, guys are good enough to pull off a biting, low slice.
 
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Not sure what NTRP the better guy is, but he won the tournament without losing a set and he straight-setted a guy who beat a d1 player in an earlier round.
Apparently the younger guy (35yo) had an ATP singles rank #613 in 2006 and is an ex-Davis Cup player for Indonesia 2003-2009.
 
N"brush up" is a remedial mantra, usually for beginning players learning the concept of topspin. Overly simplistic IMO, and I'm not sure how this gets NYTAs FH to 5.0, but maybe thinking "brush up" and practicing his current mechanics is that path.
Actually, "overly simplistic" is sort of the point.
The better I get, the more I see that TT is a place to miss the forest for the trees.

Coach's point was that he wants NYTA to hit a higher ball, more topspin, and land it deeper.

That's all.

Let's make this simple:
BAD: Low bullet. Clears net by inches. Often hits net. Lands in service box. Bounces to waist height.
GOOD: Higher arc. Clears net by several feet. Huge topspin. Never hits net. Lands in well past service box. Never bounces to waist height.

However you get there doesn't matter. Brushing up will get you there.

Also, this coach did not get to Top 1000 or whatever by posting on a forum, using protractors, and watching slo-mo videos of Sampras.
In an overly simplistic way, he got there by playing tennis, and seeing what worked. (See GOOD vs. BAD above) That's all.
 
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Exactly what about his prep is long and complicated. Looks to me like he drops his racket down and then swings for the most part. There isn't even a loop leading up the racket drop. So I'm not quite sure what the issue is here.
just to add, i actually went out of my way to eliminate a big loop because i'm usually playing with big hitters (bigger than me anyway) on never-been-resurfaced-courts (ie i'm a counter puncher, and try to use/absorb the incoming pace)
 
Your take back is still pretty long. From the center, your racquet was taken back to an angle of at least 120 degree, maybe even more.
I also had that long take back. But when I play good players, they don't give me time and space to do that long prep. When I shorten my swing, focus on hitting a clean ball with top spin and decent racquet head speed, the result is very positive.
Now I am doing only about 90 degree take back :) .
I think unconsciously we all have that long take back from watching tennis on TV. The thing is with that long take back, its hard to get good racquet head speed and clean hitting.
I am no coach so I don't know how you can simplify your stroke. But you can still do whatever you are doing now with only 90 degree take back, focus on good racquet speed, clean hitting and top spin.
A bonus with short take back is that you can get the power from your core easier, so extra power.
Everything applies to the backhand side too.
 
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Chadillac

Guest
suggestions on how to simplify?
He is probably looking at your lack of pause between the back and fore swing (step 1 step 2 stuff to simplify, i use this method). You take the racket back, then a little bit more, like a ballet.

The pause is good for people who are erratic, yours is fine. Flat, top or slice your timing was there (except the mis hit xcourt fh off his slice, you just came up to steep, this tip wouldnt help)

I had lazy prep, so put a focus on giving my self more time.

Edit. I think they call it a buggy whip fh (old schoolers can correct), Ferrer hits very similar. A better example to pattern after than russel, not sure why i didnt think of him. You guys are similar (like hewitt once said :) )
 
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Your take back is still pretty long. From the center, your racquet was taken back to an angle of at least 120 degree, maybe even more.
I also had that long take back. But when I play good players, they don't give me time and space to do that long prep. When I shorten my swing, focus on hitting a clean ball with top spin and decent racquet head speed, the result is very positive.
Now I am doing only about 90 degree take back :) .
I think unconsciously we all have that long take back from watching tennis on TV. The thing is with that long take back, its hard to get good racquet head speed and clean hitting.
I am no coach so I don't know how you can simplify your stroke. But you can still do whatever you are doing now with only 90 degree take back, focus on good racquet speed, clean hitting and top spin.
A bonus with short take back is that you can get the power from your core easier, so extra power.
Everything applies to the backhand side too.
got a vid of your or pro showing that (short) takeback?
 
Mine is probably hideous, but check this one out:
www.youtube.com/watch?v=ztGHyLJ9UGw
Looks like Tomic take back is even shorter than yours.
From the video, I can tell you and I play very similar style. Do you realize in 5 minute video of your hitting, you didn't hit a single DTL, FH or BH. You probably prefer to hit crosscourt. Having a long prep makes it harder to DTL.
 
Your take back is still pretty long. From the center, your racquet was taken back to an angle of at least 120 degree, maybe even more.
I also had that long take back. But when I play good players, they don't give me time and space to do that long prep. When I shorten my swing, focus on hitting a clean ball with top spin and decent racquet head speed, the result is very positive.
Now I am doing only about 90 degree take back :) .
I think unconsciously we all have that long take back from watching tennis on TV. The thing is with that long take back, its hard to get good racquet head speed and clean hitting.
I am no coach so I don't know how you can simplify your stroke. But you can still do whatever you are doing now with only 90 degree take back, focus on good racquet speed, clean hitting and top spin.
A bonus with short take back is that you can get the power from your core easier, so extra power.
Everything applies to the backhand side too.
Sorry I have to disagree, 90 degrees from ready position is not enough. It would roughly get the racquet parallel to the baseline and ideally you want it kinda pointing to the right corner of the back fence. Yes, against good players, you need early preparation so do it. With the backhand, I have to draw it even further back. Of course mine is one handed but the point is a decent amount of take back gives you more power. Also, rather than making a one size fits all change to the take back, you have to learn to adjust it situationally. Like on the return you need a more compact stroke. If you don't have time you need to be able to make a shot with limited prep. But that doesn't mean you should change your stroke as a whole. If you have time, by all means draw the racquet back.
 
Mine is probably hideous, but check this one out:
www.youtube.com/watch?v=ztGHyLJ9UGw
Looks like Tomic take back is even shorter than yours.
From the video, I can tell you and I play very similar style. Do you realize in 5 minute video of your hitting, you didn't hit a single DTL, FH or BH. You probably prefer to hit crosscourt. Having a long prep makes it harder to DTL.
He did hit a DTL FH albeit down the middle. It was short and the coach whacked a winner off it.
 
Sorry I have to disagree, 90 degrees from ready position is not enough. It would roughly get the racquet parallel to the baseline and ideally you want it kinda pointing to the right corner of the back fence. Yes, against good players, you need early preparation so do it. With the backhand, I have to draw it even further back. Of course mine is one handed but the point is a decent amount of take back gives you more power. Also, rather than making a one size fits all change to the take back, you have to learn to adjust it situationally. Like on the return you need a more compact stroke. If you don't have time you need to be able to make a shot with limited prep. But that doesn't mean you should change your stroke as a whole. If you have time, by all means draw the racquet back.
I never say 90 degree takeback is enough. My point is a longer take back will sacrifice things such as racquet speed, clean contact, and core action. What you gain from a long take back, AT OUR LEVEL, is not enough to compensate these stuff.
What I suggest is starting from a short compact stroke, get yourself comfortable with all types of pace and spin. When you are more proficient, then you can take back longer.
DTL shots are more about shot placement rather than power, keep your opponent on the move. a DTL down the middle is just an invitation to finish the point off.
 
Mine is probably hideous, but check this one out:
www.youtube.com/watch?v=ztGHyLJ9UGw
Looks like Tomic take back is even shorter than yours.
From the video, I can tell you and I play very similar style. Do you realize in 5 minute video of your hitting, you didn't hit a single DTL, FH or BH. You probably prefer to hit crosscourt. Having a long prep makes it harder to DTL.
Not true. Hitting dtl requires a later contact point. The contact point for the cc forehand is farther in front.

Also the 5.5 player was way faster than ntya so if he hits dtl, he exposes himself to the cc to his bh and he's not fast enough to get over to cover that and still hit something good enough that the 5.5 won't just put away.
 
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I never say 90 degree takeback is enough. My point is a longer take back will sacrifice things such as racquet speed, clean contact, and core action. What you gain from a long take back, AT OUR LEVEL, is not enough to compensate these stuff.
What I suggest is starting from a short compact stroke, get yourself comfortable with all types of pace and spin. When you are more proficient, then you can take back longer.
DTL shots are more about shot placement rather than power, keep your opponent on the move. a DTL down the middle is just an invitation to finish the point off.
I think he is comfortable enough per se, just rushed against a top notch player. The gap in level is too much and not something that can be addressed by a change in take back. I did however advocate keeping the racquet going forward a bit more as pulling across too soon results in a short ball.
 
I think he is comfortable enough per se, just rushed against a top notch player. The gap in level is too much and not something that can be addressed by a change in take back. I did however advocate keeping the racquet going forward a bit more as pulling across too soon results in a short ball.
If i know a way to make 4.5 player beat a 5.5, don't you think I am already rich by now :) .
The coach was not even hitting seriously. He can make tough shots nonchalantly because NYTA did not put him in any tough spot, no pace, no placement. Every shot NYTA made was 2 3 steps around the center with average pace.
My suggestion is shorten his stroke, make it compact and explosive, easier to control the placement. It can be right or wrong for NYTA. Only way to find out is to try.
 

atp2015

Hall of Fame
I think he is comfortable enough per se, just rushed against a top notch player. The gap in level is too much and not something that can be addressed by a change in take back. I did however advocate keeping the racquet going forward a bit more as pulling across too soon results in a short ball.
Agree with everything here. Also, it appears that though the wrist leads the racket head (rh) to start with, the lag closes down too quickly. get more spin when the lag is maintained longer.
 
Agree with everything here. Also, it appears that though the wrist leads the racket head (rh) to start with, the lag closes down too quickly. get more spin when the lag is maintained longer.
I think he is comfortable enough per se, just rushed against a top notch player. The gap in level is too much and not something that can be addressed by a change in take back. I did however advocate keeping the racquet going forward a bit more as pulling across too soon results in a short ball.
Honestly, how do you guys think a person manage to fix the followings:
+ the wrist leads the racket head (rh) to start with, the lag closes down too quickly
+ keeping the racquet going forward a bit more as pulling across too soon
Without serious coaching, how can a person fix such micro things? You guys are pointing out things that you can see in the video, but nothing about why and how you can fix it.
 
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Agree with everything here. Also, it appears that though the wrist leads the racket head (rh) to start with, the lag closes down too quickly. get more spin when the lag is maintained longer.
can you explain more? not sure what you mean by "lag closes down too quickly"
 
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Honestly, how do you guys think a person manage to fix the followings:
+ the wrist leads the racket head (rh) to start with, the lag closes down too quickly
+ keeping the racquet going forward a bit more as pulling across too soon
Without serious coaching, how can a person fix such micro things? You guys are pointing out things that you can see in the video, but nothing about why and how you can fix it.
regarding "pulling across to quickly" i think the solution is the get into better position sooner.

when i'm in position, i do tend to extend through to target much more...

but like someone else said, when you're getting jerked around by a better player,... i'm doing whatever i can to just get it back (ie hitting late off the back foot, and pulling across to just get it back)

side note oscar wenger fans would advocate pulling across ;). while i like oscars stuff in general i think pros pull across because they are behind (in time)... but i currently don't have the skill to pull across and get the ball deep consistently.
 
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I never say 90 degree takeback is enough. My point is a longer take back will sacrifice things such as racquet speed, clean contact, and core action. What you gain from a long take back, AT OUR LEVEL, is not enough to compensate these stuff.
What I suggest is starting from a short compact stroke, get yourself comfortable with all types of pace and spin. When you are more proficient, then you can take back longer.
DTL shots are more about shot placement rather than power, keep your opponent on the move. a DTL down the middle is just an invitation to finish the point off.
while i appreciate your feedback,...

after watching some ferrer slomo vids, i disagree that my backswing is too big/long....

however i did notice that i do tend to point my strings to the back fence more (vs down to the ground)... making the stoke more wristy (ala sock). i wonder if i've always been doing that or if i started doing that when the coach said to get more topspin (via lag and brush)

i was getting a ton more topspin, but i'll have to decide if it's worth sacrificing simplicity

anywho thx for the feedback,... led me to inspecting further.
 
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He did hit a DTL FH albeit down the middle. It was short and the coach whacked a winner off it.
he wacked a winner off anything that landed near the service line (that wasn't near the sideline)...

truly punished anything wasn't 3-4ft from the baseline (which is what he was trying to get me to do more often in my rally shots)
 
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He is probably looking at your lack of pause between the back and fore swing (step 1 step 2 stuff to simplify, i use this method). You take the racket back, then a little bit more, like a ballet.

The pause is good for people who are erratic, yours is fine. Flat, top or slice your timing was there (except the mis hit xcourt fh off his slice, you just came up to steep, this tip wouldnt help)

I had lazy prep, so put a focus on giving my self more time.

Edit. I think they call it a buggy whip fh (old schoolers can correct), Ferrer hits very similar. A better example to pattern after than russel, not sure why i didnt think of him. You guys are similar (like hewitt once said :) )
thx for the comments

regarding the pause between takeback and forward swing... i put a lot of time trying to eliminate that pause :)

pausing imo robs me of power (and harder to sync). sometimes i have to pause, because incoming pace, spin is beyond my skill,.. but in general i want to have one continuous backswing to forward swing.

oscar wenger (who i got it from) promoted this as well. call it "just in time" prep to stay in sync with the ball...
 
Watching Ferrer slow mo video is not gonna help you. He has one of the best pair of wheels on tour. He was trained with a coach since he was a kid. Of course, your backswing doesn't look long / big compared to his.
 
Watch your video, forward to :38, and go slow motion from there.
This is a fairly neutral rally. The shot your coach made was not an outright winner, it was deep, but not baseline deep, at least 4 5 feet from the baseline, with average pace. But you failed to put the ball back.
Look at your take back, it was very far back. Then you realize that you did not have enough time to hit the ball when its in front of you. Then you rushed your stroke through. The whole mechanic was a mess because you did not have enough time to complete a swing, the contact was not clean.
 
Honestly, how do you guys think a person manage to fix the followings:
+ the wrist leads the racket head (rh) to start with, the lag closes down too quickly
+ keeping the racquet going forward a bit more as pulling across too soon
Without serious coaching, how can a person fix such micro things? You guys are pointing out things that you can see in the video, but nothing about why and how you can fix it.
Actually I just said it. Just try to keep the racquet going forward, try to drive. As you might do on your backhand. Allow your body to propel the stroke. The problem with the FH is in trying to really whack it, we swing the racquet all the way across and it doesn't create a deep ball. Instead of always going for maximum RHS, try to make contact in front of you and, as I said, drive the stroke a little (not too much, which will just result in the ball going long).
 
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