Video Editing tool

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Hall of Fame
Hi All,

I took some video of some tennis play over the weekend and sat down to work on editing it. We recently replaced our desktop (Win7) with a laptop (Win10).

Where did Movie Maker go???:eek:

And how do you use Video Editor??:confused::mad::( All it wants to do is look at my photos from the cloud or something. When I tried to import an actual video, all I got were still images. Is there a tutorial somewhere? I'm so behind the times on current tech...
 

ChaelAZ

Legend
I use Da Vinci Resolve 15. It's free professional software, that might look complex but very intuitive once you get it.
Yeah, huge move when they made it free this year. We have a lot of students that use it, and here is the video I send them for learning basics. Jamie does a good job of breaking it down.

 

2good4U

Professional
I edited an hour of 720hd video with Windows Movie Maker, on an older Windows 7 laptop.

Took about 4 hours, between WMM processing for preview, editing and saving moving.

The original video was well under 2 gigs, the edited 30 minute video was 2.5 gigs!

Definitely going to give this a try! (thanks)

P.S. Did a search for it and another free video editor came up called 'Filmora Video Editor'.

That might be worth a try too.
 
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ChaelAZ

Legend
I edited an hour of 720hd video with Windows Movie Maker, on an older Windows 7 laptop.

Took about 4 hours, between WMM processing for preview, editing and saving moving.

The original video was well under 2 gigs, the edited 30 minute video was 2.5 gigs!

Definitely going to give this a try! (thanks)

P.S. Did a search for it and another free video editor came up called 'Filmora Video Editor'.

That might be worth a try too.
Filmora is kinda kludgy. We have students that use it, but they seem to have to do a lot of troubleshooting. Or more than others.

If anyone is looking to buy something, Premiere or Camtasia are really solid.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Hall of Fame
Win10 can still add Movie Maker

See here
The free version is pretty limited. Supposedly all they allow you to do is trim the beginning and the end. I couldn't even get that to work properly. You gotta pay for the Pro version to do anything more.

I'm just looking for a tool that can cut out all the time picking up balls and DF'ing.
 

ChaelAZ

Legend
The free version is pretty limited. Supposedly all they allow you to do is trim the beginning and the end. I couldn't even get that to work properly. You gotta pay for the Pro version to do anything more.

I'm just looking for a tool that can cut out all the time picking up balls and DF'ing.
Hadn't used it, so good to know it basically sucks now. DaVinci is still probably the best bet. learning curve is a bit steep, but rock solid product that used to be a padi for program.

Actually, if you upload to YouTube the new Studio Beta has a decent cutting tool for the video. Downside is, you have to upload the whole uncut versoin first. But it is an option.
 

dennis

Rookie
I haven't tried DaVinci. Heard good things about Lightworks, not sure it's free though? I use Blender, I can recommend it but I think it requires a lot more effort to get going with than the others, I had to watch a tutorial just to do basic stuff. It's fast to work with once you know the shortcuts and figure out the workspace layout. It was a contrast to Adobe Premiere (and Final Cut Pro) which as far as I remember (it was ten years ago) I could figure out straight away, I don't use them anymore though.
 
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ChaelAZ

Legend
Also forgot, Avid had a free version of their NLE. Just looked and I think, from what I can tell at least, that the MediaComposer First is free. Worht checking. When I strted in the business Avid and Media100 were the shizz.
 

onehandbh

Legend
Also forgot, Avid had a free version of their NLE. Just looked and I think, from what I can tell at least, that the MediaComposer First is free. Worht checking. When I strted in the business Avid and Media100 were the shizz.
I remember when Avid seemed to be by far the most robust and reliable.

Then Final Cut came.

I had a tiny personal project and couldn’t believe how all the annoying hiccups and headaches went away once I went from i think a windows editor to FCP. Nowadays Adobe Preimiere is pretty good and there have even been indie films and a bit bigger budget films edited on it.

If you have a small team and need some special effects a lot of people like Autodesk’s suite of software. A lot of the TV commecials in the US and Asia appear to be using it.
 

ChaelAZ

Legend
I remember when Avid seemed to be by far the most robust and reliable.

Then Final Cut came.

I had a tiny personal project and couldn’t believe how all the annoying hiccups and headaches went away once I went from i think a windows editor to FCP. Nowadays Adobe Preimiere is pretty good and there have even been indie films and a bit bigger budget films edited on it.

If you have a small team and need some special effects a lot of people like Autodesk’s suite of software. A lot of the TV commecials in the US and Asia appear to be using it.


SO DO NOT USE THE AVID PRODUCT. Wow! Thought I would test it since I hadn't played around in Avid for a while, and what a pain in the butt to sign up for an account, download the HUGE file to install it, which installs all kinds of cloud services, which you have to login to again to get the free access, and it runs a bunch of stuff in the background. Worse yet, it didn't even open native mp4 files and was going to convert them. Not worth the time!

Stick with the others mentioned above. DaVinci Resolve is still my recommendation for power and simplicity.
 

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I just want to trim the beginning, maybe add a title, then just trim the time picking up balls on the court, and add clips to the file since GoPro cuts up the video into 20min chunks.
 

movdqa

Talk Tennis Guru
I've been using iMovie for years but I went Mac back in 2008. I have a Windows 7 Virtual Machine on my Mac though, so I guess I could still use Movie Maker. We have 7 on a few old laptops which are likely in a closet somewhere but it would be nice to use the faster systems for something as demanding as video editing.
 

ChaelAZ

Legend
For my Win machines I liked Movie Maker. I haven't used it on any of our Win10 machines though. Like @movdqa I am a Mac guy and the free iMovie on my phone or desktop is free and excellent, but I virtualize Win7 as well and still ahve Movie Maker on it. I may have to upgrade to Win10 and test the new MM and a few others.

But glad you found a solution! Let's see that video now.
 

SoZ

New User
I just started my own low cost tennis editing shop. if you have a fame on TT and I can edit your video for free.
 
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onehandbh

Legend
I edited an hour of 720hd video with Windows Movie Maker, on an older Windows 7 laptop.

Took about 4 hours, between WMM processing for preview, editing and saving moving.

The original video was well under 2 gigs, the edited 30 minute video was 2.5 gigs!

Definitely going to give this a try! (thanks)

P.S. Did a search for it and another free video editor came up called 'Filmora Video Editor'.

That might be worth a try too.
Compression and bitrate reduction is your friend.

Try reducing the bitrate when encoding your output files. You can have a 30 minute video well under 1 gig with decent quality.
 

SoZ

New User
Microsoft Movie was my favorite but it took too long to save the edit video and also after hours fingers on hot keys and I got finger burns :). In the end I decided to use machine learning to let machine do the editing work and wrote some code during the Covid time to automatically processing the video. It is still working in progress and need users feedback. So feel free to send me some videos if you don't want edit your own videos and I can edit yours for free. Just check out my primitive website (Yes, the website is ugly :C https://tennisvideocutting.square.site/ ) or shot me a message here.
 

ChaelAZ

Legend
I've heard some some good things about Edius, but have never used it before.

For now I use Adobe Premiere. May switch to Davinci Resolve if I switch to PC or get a new desk top computer.

Wow, flash back! When I had my TV show I used EDIUS products for the hardware acceleration and real-time effects, and the editor itself was good. Didn't even know they were still in business.
 

onehandbh

Legend
Wow, flash back! When I had my TV show I used EDIUS products for the hardware acceleration and real-time effects, and the editor itself was good. Didn't even know they were still in business.
Are you going to be an early adopter of the new apple silicon computers? or will you stay with the current intel-based ones until things get more stable and more 3rd party software support emerges?
 

DeeeFoo

Rookie
There's a lot of powerful free video-editing software out there now. Hitfilm Express and DaVinci Resolve are probably the two biggest ones.
 

Chas Tennis

G.O.A.T.
A big problem with high speed video of tennis strokes is the dead time between strokes and editing those out. For example, say that you video backhands for 2 minutes at 240 fps and record 20 backhands.

I have looked for the editing software capability where you view strips of many frames, that seems best for editing out the dead time. Anyone use that kind of editor? Could you quickly apply edit instructions to 20 backhands and then rewrite just once? Does the editor work on your camera's SD card?
 
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If you only need to remove ball-picking and chat time, lossless-cut is ideal. It can't zoom, add text, overlay, transition, picture-in-picture, no nothing. A 1.5 hour recording consistently remains 25-35 mins after edit.
 

Chas Tennis

G.O.A.T.
A big problem with high speed video of tennis strokes is the dead time between strokes and editing those out. For example, say that you video backhands for 2 minutes at 240 fps and record 20 backhands.

I have looked for the editing software capability where you view strips of many frames, that seems best for editing out the dead time. Anyone use that kind of editor? Could you quickly apply edit instructions to 20 backhands and then rewrite just once? Does the editor work on your camera's SD card?

If you only need to remove ball-picking and chat time, lossless-cut is ideal. It can't zoom, add text, overlay, transition, picture-in-picture, no nothing. A 1.5 hour recording consistently remains 25-35 mins after edit.
"Lossless-cut" looks interesting for my application of cutting dead wood. Will it work on an SD card in the computer?

Version in Mar 2020 Youtube.
 
"Lossless-cut" looks interesting for my application of cutting dead wood. Will it work on an SD card in the computer?
Yes, it just see files, whether in the computer or in an SD card mounted to the computer.

It is fast because it does not transcode. What it does is: your source is from frame 1 to frame 10,000, now merge frame 23 to 101, 143 to 238, ... into one file.
 

Digital Atheist

Professional
Lossless-cut can be good, but it has been very crash happy on this particular machine. For straight cutting/editing/joining/exporting I've had much better results using Avidemux despite the fact the interface is kinda ugly. However, you need slightly more.

+1 for Resolve; the install file is large, requires decent hardware, but it has many many features and if you plan on doing any level of serious editing then this is probably the best bet imo. Start as you plan on finishing. There's a learning curve, but that's the case with most video editors anyway. Shotcut is lighter, simpler, and has less features but you can still do most things adequately and it is on par with Hitfilm Express.

I would start by playing with Resolve and if it seems like overkill then try out Shotcut or Hitfilm Express.
 

Chas Tennis

G.O.A.T.
Yes, it just see files, whether in the computer or in an SD card mounted to the computer.

It is fast because it does not transcode. What it does is: your source is from frame 1 to frame 10,000, now merge frame 23 to 101, 143 to 238, ... into one file.
Thanks for the information.

Suppose I had a video recorded at 240 fps with 20 backhands
Each backhand stroke I wanted to save was 1 second long and recorded at 240 fps = 240 frames
Dead time between each backhand, 6 seconds recorded at 240 fps = 1440 frames

Could I go through once and view all 20 backhands and identify all the frames to discard and then do one rewrite to save all? Or would I rewrite to edit out each backhand?

Do you notice any quality issues?

A review say that they expected it to edit to one frame exactly and it didn't quite do that. I don't think that is important to me for getting rid of dead wood, but I'd like to know if you do. There is a comment in the review about stopping on the exact frame or stopping at each reference frame (not exact quote). Reference frame - I assume - of a compression that was used in the original camera compression. ? Notice anything like that vs exact frame.

About what is the cost?

(My understanding of video compression is that the camera picks reference frames and then compresses by recording the difference between the reference frame and the next several frames and that makes the video file much smaller.)
 
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movdqa

Talk Tennis Guru
(My understanding of video compression is that the camera picks reference frames and then compresses by recording the difference between the reference frame and then next several frames and that makes the video much shorter.)
Yup. That's correct. So software has to reconstruct frames and hold them in a buffer.
 
Suppose I had a video recorded at 240 fps with 20 backhands
Each backhand stroke I wanted to save was 1 second long and recorded at 240 fps = 240 frames
Dead time between each backhand, 6 seconds recorded at 240 fps = 1440 frames

Could I go through once and view all 20 backhands and identify all the frames to discard and then do one rewrite to save all? Or would I rewrite to edit out each backhand?
You can fast forward up to I don't know how much. I've seen 300%. And you can move forward frame by frame. Pause at the frame you want to cut, put a marker (keyframe). Actually you can put a keyframe during replay if you have quick reaction. Repeat till the end. Now you have like 40 keyframes in your stripe, each stroke having a start and an end. Run once to merge all into one file.

Do you notice any quality issues?
Most likely no quality difference, but it depends on your source format.

A review say that they expected it to edit to one frame exactly and it didn't quite do that. I don't think that is important to me for getting rid of dead wood, but I'd like to know if you do. There is a comment in the review about stopping on the exact frame or stopping at each reference frame (not exact quote). Reference frame - I assume - of a compression that was used in the original camera compression. ? Notice anything like that vs exact frame.
For my need I don't care at all about the accuracy of the exact frame. I just need to remove a few seconds between two points in a match.

About what is the cost?
Free
 
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user92626

G.O.A.T.
Anyone using Note8 (or any Note or Samsung) to record slow motion clips?

How do you guys get the files into Windows and they're still slow motion? They become regular speed clips for me. Strange.
 

ChaelAZ

Legend
Are you going to be an early adopter of the new apple silicon computers? or will you stay with the current intel-based ones until things get more stable and more 3rd party software support emerges?

Back when I had my TV show and production company I would definitely be an early adopter. Now that I have to fund everything out of my own pocket...I use my iMacs for years before replacing. I went 8 years on the last one, and my current one is a year old now.
 

ChaelAZ

Legend
A big problem with high speed video of tennis strokes is the dead time between strokes and editing those out. For example, say that you video backhands for 2 minutes at 240 fps and record 20 backhands.

I have looked for the editing software capability where you view strips of many frames, that seems best for editing out the dead time. Anyone use that kind of editor? Could you quickly apply edit instructions to 20 backhands and then rewrite just once? Does the editor work on your camera's SD card?

I dunno. I just scrub the timeline and then use keyboard shotcuts to slice at the timeline and remove dead spots. I can do a full match pretty quick. I usually go through and do that first, then start going through to see what clips to include in the final edit. For slow motion video, I edit at normal speed then apply the slomo where needed.

I use iMove or Final Cut Pro mostly, but also have Camtasia. All have that zoom feature @TypeRx
 
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