Volley vid

travlerajm

G.O.A.T.
Backhand volley looks solid!
Forehand volley... well, you're breaking the golden rule of volleying on many of them: Always keep your racquet in front of your body!
Compare your forehand volley take-back (where you sometimes reach behind you) with Venus's in the sequence below. Notice that her hand starts in front of her body, stays in front, and then goes forward from there.
https://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/index.php?threads/the-volley-and-the-open-racket-face.421804/
 
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Shroud

G.O.A.T.
Looks good. Why did your hitting partner hit all but the last one to your forehand?
The vid was really about a continental grip turned a bit to the bh. A poster in that thread had asked how one could hit fh volleys with the grip so I made the vid
 

Shroud

G.O.A.T.
Backhand volley looks solid!
Forehand volley... well, you're breaking the golden rule of volleying on many of them: Always keep your racquet in front of your body!
Compare your forehand volley take-back (where you sometimes reach behind you) with Venus's in the sequence below. Notice that her hand starts in front of her body, stays in front, and then goes forward from there.
https://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/index.php?threads/the-volley-and-the-open-racket-face.421804/
Yikes. How do i stop the take back?
 

Shroud

G.O.A.T.
I see - maybe your regular conti volley is out in front more?
Doubtful. I think the one in the vid is better for hitting further back and may be a bad idea if so. Hit it better but that may be because it masks the flawed takkeback more
 

travlerajm

G.O.A.T.
Yikes. How do i stop the take back?
Doubtful. I think the one in the vid is better for hitting further back and may be a bad idea if so. Hit it better but that may be because it masks the flawed takkeback more
Silver lining is at least that grip is great for your backhand volley. That last bh volley at the end of the vid is textbook step in weight transfer.
 

Shroud

G.O.A.T.
Silver lining is at least that grip is great for your backhand volley. That last bh volley at the end of the vid is textbook step in weight transfer.
Backhand was always better. Could out volley the fh with a clip board i bet. I will try to hit more out in front and see.
 

S&V-not_dead_yet

Talk Tennis Guru
Yikes. How do i stop the take back?
You're bringing the racquet back mostly with your arm as opposed to it coming back naturally as a result of a unit turn. That's how you're able to bring the racquet back so far: if you were doing a unit turn, your torso would not want to rotate that far.

One cue to remind yourself is to keep your off-hand on the throat as you take the racquet back rather than immediately releasing.

Another is to stay on the SL rather than aggressively moving forward and have your partner feed relatively slow balls so reaction time is taken out of the equation.

One more thing I noticed: after contact, you have a fairly aggressive downward, chopping motion as if you are trying to impart heavy backspin, which I think adds to the variability of the volley. I was taught to continue moving the racquet forward in a guiding motion, with the face that you contacted the ball ending up pointing skyward. Give that a try also and see if it helps.
 
C

Chadillac

Guest
Blx blade and seeing your forearms was auto stop :)

31secs to 46, look at where your elbow is upon contact vs the others

you missed last one on face angle, was top of the net, no worries.
 

kramer woodie

Professional
Yikes. How do i stop the take back?
Shroud

As S&V said, manage the take back with your left hand up on the throat near the bottom of the hoop. Use the left hand to limit the take back. With the racquet taken back you should be able to see the racquet head with your right eye and the left hand moves off the racquet forward framing the ball (like a picture with a frame around it) so the ball is centered between the left hand and the racquet head.

Now a tip from the Pros like Mark Knoles, hit the volley with your legs. If you watch film of Knoles or the Bryon brothers you will see that
their front left foot on a forehand volley is about 3 inch off the court as they make contact with the ball and their weight moves forward landing on the front foot which is what moves the racquet through the ball. Then they finish the volley by sliding the racquet head under the ball.

The same holds true for the back hand volley, again use the left hand high on the racquet to move the racquet take back. I would try to
keep the racquet head center of your chest, don't take back further. Too long a take back slow you down getting back in front (too far to travel). Keep the volley stroke short take back and make ball contact in front of your front foot.

Before, you or anyone else gets to excited, yes, there are exceptions to the above recommendations, such as a stabbing volley. It's is
recommended to practice the basic forehand and backhand volleys making contact with the front foot slightly above the court falling forward onto the front foot and finish pushing through with the follow through.

Aloha
 

movdqa

Talk Tennis Guru
It's a bit hard to tell from the angle but it looked like you could hit further out in front. It appears that you like to hit forehand volleys with a mostly open stance. It would have been nice to see a few with a closed stance and the racquet further out in front.
 

Shroud

G.O.A.T.
It's a bit hard to tell from the angle but it looked like you could hit further out in front. It appears that you like to hit forehand volleys with a mostly open stance. It would have been nice to see a few with a closed stance and the racquet further out in front.
Its why my volley is a shadow of its former self. Nothing got by me but now I have been focusing so much on the forehand ground stroke I hit volleys open stance. Maybe I should start a “Myth of the closed volley” thread.
 

movdqa

Talk Tennis Guru
Its why my volley is a shadow of its former self. Nothing got by me but now I have been focusing so much on the forehand ground stroke I hit volleys open stance. Maybe I should start a “Myth of the closed volley” thread.
I think that it's fine to use varying stances when volleying but when you get that creampuff, taking the big step with the left gets you closer to the net and able to cut off angles and provides you with some nice power with the stroke. You may not have enough time on a lot of volleys and an open stance or semiopen stance is fine.
 

Off The Wall

Semi-Pro
Yeah, your bh is far quieter than your fh. You snap your wrist a lot at your fh. My guess is that you are trying to generate underspin? If so, the effects of underpin isn't much compared to the introduction of Miss-hits. Most volleys are hit with an open racquet face, regardless. Accept the amount of underpin the open face gives and also the subtraction of miss-hits.

You and virtually everyone who started playing as an adult try to actively hit volleys. Volleys are touch shots. Start by blocking the ball like a hockey goalie. You'll soon see that you have time to add shoulder turn and then stepping. Volley with a soft touch.

if your grip doesn't slip when going from backhand volley to forehand, you are holding the racquet too tightly.
 

Shroud

G.O.A.T.
Yeah, your bh is far quieter than your fh. You snap your wrist a lot at your fh. My guess is that you are trying to generate underspin? If so, the effects of underpin isn't much compared to the introduction of Miss-hits. Most volleys are hit with an open racquet face, regardless. Accept the amount of underpin the open face gives and also the subtraction of miss-hits.

You and virtually everyone who started playing as an adult try to actively hit volleys. Volleys are touch shots. Start by blocking the ball like a hockey goalie. You'll soon see that you have time to add shoulder turn and then stepping. Volley with a soft touch.

if your grip doesn't slip when going from backhand volley to forehand, you are holding the racquet too tightly.
I can try that I suppose. Though it seems like it will just be drop volleys. I dont exactly get much trampoline from the stringbed and gripping loose will be interesting. Will try
 

coupergear

Professional
Great tips all. I also noticed on your forehand volley you tend to do this follow-through move long after the ball has left the strings. Kind of this slow shadow follow through. While it's a tacked on move that really isn't impacting the ball (it's the unit turn/take back the real issue as diagnosed excellently above) it still shows you have a mental picture of the fh volley as being a longer stroke.
 

Off The Wall

Semi-Pro
I can try that I suppose. Though it seems like it will just be drop volleys. I dont exactly get much trampoline from the stringbed and gripping loose will be interesting. Will try
Yes, drop volleys at first. You'll be holding the racquet strings in front of the ball, waiting. After you learn you can volley without swinging, then you can slowly add bits of power: shoulder turn, racquet movement, stepping. It will depend on the pace of the incoming shot.
The goalie setup will always be useful for reflex volleys. Get your strings in front of the ball and aim them. Slower incoming balls can be hit firmer, with more movement, but don't chop at it. Racquet head open and nudge the ball. As if you were bouncing the ball on the ground with your racquet. Volleys are about placement first to win; then add power to Showboat.

A looser grip adds feel. A tight grip gives the racquet a board-like feeling. Not controllable.
 

maleyoyo

Professional
any tips appreciated

You have a typical issue with most people, "lazy feet syndrome", because you wait for the ball to come to you rather than come meet the ball at your ideal contact zone.
You wait for the ball to drop below the net then have to hit up as a defensive volley whereas if you take half a step forward it can be an offensive volley.
Same with high volley.
 

movdqa

Talk Tennis Guru
You have a typical issue with most people, "lazy feet syndrome", because you wait for the ball to come to you rather than come meet the ball at your ideal contact zone.
You wait for the ball to drop below the net then have to hit up as a defensive volley whereas if you take half a step forward it can be an offensive volley.
Same with high volley.
One thing about practicing volleys with someone at the baseline - you're trying to keep things going so you're hitting back to the other person. Every once in a while you can smash away but the goal of keeping things going means that you may not be as aggressive with your footwork.
 

Shroud

G.O.A.T.
One thing about practicing volleys with someone at the baseline - you're trying to keep things going so you're hitting back to the other person. Every once in a while you can smash away but the goal of keeping things going means that you may not be as aggressive with your footwork.
Its a good point. My volley started getting worse the moment someone told me it wasnt nice to hit winners off the feed...
 

Shroud

G.O.A.T.
Thanks man. I will try that but his instruction drives me crazy. Its like emotions. I get them but damn if they are worth anything. So what, I feel the ball on the strings but its meaningless since the ball is gone. All tht stiff is just more variables to get messed up on. At least for me. And fwiw my string bed feels like a brick mostly.

It was funny. I hit an amazing touch shot (drop volley off the return). I lost it and started talking to the forum from the court. Something like “touch shots need ball pocketing my *** mofos”. My friends were wondering what my deal was...

Anyhow i will try it since it looks like it works. Though dinky volleys are in the future I bet
 

Shroud

G.O.A.T.
You have a typical issue with most people, "lazy feet syndrome", because you wait for the ball to come to you rather than come meet the ball at your ideal contact zone.
You wait for the ball to drop below the net then have to hit up as a defensive volley whereas if you take half a step forward it can be an offensive volley.
Same with high volley.
Ugh. My natural inclination is to close and get on top of the net. But I have been aboiding that because I get lobbed to death.

Its like I am screwed either way.
 

J011yroger

Talk Tennis Guru
One thing about practicing volleys with someone at the baseline - you're trying to keep things going so you're hitting back to the other person. Every once in a while you can smash away but the goal of keeping things going means that you may not be as aggressive with your footwork.
That's just to keep your feel. Real volley practice is very different.

J
 

Shroud

G.O.A.T.
Yes, drop volleys at first. You'll be holding the racquet strings in front of the ball, waiting. After you learn you can volley without swinging, then you can slowly add bits of power: shoulder turn, racquet movement, stepping. It will depend on the pace of the incoming shot.
The goalie setup will always be useful for reflex volleys. Get your strings in front of the ball and aim them. Slower incoming balls can be hit firmer, with more movement, but don't chop at it. Racquet head open and nudge the ball. As if you were bouncing the ball on the ground with your racquet. Volleys are about placement first to win; then add power to Showboat.

A looser grip adds feel. A tight grip gives the racquet a board-like feeling. Not controllable.
I can try. I dont the feel thing though. Sure I understand the ball sinking into the strings but the ball is gone by then so what. And fwiw I think i do grip loose. Def not a death grip
 
D

Deleted member 23235

Guest
One thing about practicing volleys with someone at the baseline - you're trying to keep things going so you're hitting back to the other person. Every once in a while you can smash away but the goal of keeping things going means that you may not be as aggressive with your footwork.
you should always be aggressive with your footwork... how hard you hit the ball back depends on your feel (ie. letting the ball win the collision).
 
D

Deleted member 23235

Guest
Its a good point. My volley started getting worse the moment someone told me it wasnt nice to hit winners off the feed...
when volleying i like to think i'm using a butterfly net, and i'm just trying to catch the ball
 

coupergear

Professional
Its a good point. My volley started getting worse the moment someone told me it wasnt nice to hit winners off the feed...
IMO this is wrong thinking and keeps players swinging away and increasing their errors. That someone was right!! The intermediate wants to close the net so he's right on top and can swing away and the ball will still go in. He thinks every volley should end the point. He's masking crap technique by crowding the net. See it all the time, esp. in warmups Not saying you have crap technique, but you're fighting the "smash away" mentality a bit I feel. Indeed you should be able to pop your volley deep to your baseline partner every d*mn time, even as he keeps cranking up the pace. Have him blast rockets right at you. Pop them right back. In a live ball situation, provided you've made a good approach the fact that you're at net means you just need to control the ball back with placement, not pace, you've already robbed them of time, and you win or take control of the point.
 

coupergear

Professional
Another tip. Volley against a wall. Try to maintain the ball "in play", with no or few bounces. It forces you to stay out front with your racket, minimize extraneous motion, you have no time for the big takeback. Currently your fh contact point is always too far back and to your side, rarely out front. Also if you swing and smack it hard against the wall you'll hit a winner on yourself won't maintain the ball in play. Also helps with half- volley feel, as inevitably a volley falls short and you one-hop it back into play.
 
D

Deleted member 23235

Guest
Another tip. Volley against a wall. Try to maintain the ball "in play", with no or few bounces. It forces you to stay out front with your racket, minimize extraneous motion, you have no time for the big takeback. Currently your fh contact point is always too far back and to your side, rarely out front. Also if you swing and smack it hard against the wall you'll hit a winner on yourself won't maintain the ball in play. Also helps with half- volley feel, as inevitably a volley falls short and you one-hop it back into play.
+1 wall forces you to take no backswing
 

maleyoyo

Professional
One thing about practicing volleys with someone at the baseline - you're trying to keep things going so you're hitting back to the other person. Every once in a while you can smash away but the goal of keeping things going means that you may not be as aggressive with your footwork.
Aggressive footwork just means you get into an ideal position earlier where the ball is as high as possible so that you have more control of your placement and pace which would make it a higher percentage shot. If anything your volley is going to be crisp and keeps the rally longer and nothing prevents you to take a step back to a more neutral position if that's you prefer.
In fact at times we practice volleys starting from the baseline and keep moving up. This way you have more area to cover which requires more aggressive footwork.
What you don't want is to be a pusher at net. The only defensive volley should be the first volley, and best way to deal with that...aggressive footwork.
I see people practice like the OP all the time but not sure how well it translates to match play.
 
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maleyoyo

Professional
Ugh. My natural inclination is to close and get on top of the net. But I have been aboiding that because I get lobbed to death.

Its like I am screwed either way.
If you get lobbed often then more reason to be more offensive at net to rob them time and keep them off balance. It should be 1,2,3...if you let them have a fourth shot you are toast.
 

coupergear

Professional
Aggressive footwork just means you get into an ideal position earlier where the ball is as high as possible so that you have more control of your placement and pace which would make it a higher percentage shot. If anything your volley is going to be crisp and keeps the rally longer and nothing prevents you to take a step back to a more neutral position if that's you prefer.
In fact at times we practice volleys starting from the baseline and keep moving up. This way you have more area to cover which requires more aggressive footwork.
What you don't want is to be a pusher at net. The only defensive volley should be the first volley, and best way to deal with that...aggressive footwork.
I see people practice like the OP all the time but not sure how well it translates to match play.
Imo don't get hung up on footwork. If you're volleying correctly the footwork will follow. As the pace increases on the incoming ball, often there is no time for any footwork, it's all racket work. Too often I see players lunging into a closed stance because they've been told this is the correct footwork, yet they aren't volleying a ball they need to move to. So they're trying to do all this stepping and crossing and they have no time for that. It's akin to swinging at the volley, extraneous motion that takes too long and results in being late. Wall volleying helps reduce unnecessary footwork too.
 

S&V-not_dead_yet

Talk Tennis Guru
Imo don't get hung up on footwork. If you're volleying correctly the footwork will follow. As the pace increases on the incoming ball, often there is no time for any footwork, it's all racket work. Too often I see players lunging into a closed stance because they've been told this is the correct footwork, yet they aren't volleying a ball they need to move to. So they're trying to do all this stepping and crossing and they have no time for that. It's akin to swinging at the volley, extraneous motion that takes too long and results in being late. Wall volleying helps reduce unnecessary footwork too.
Disagree; as one user's signature states, "you volley with your feet". Good footwork allows the possibility of good volleying [although it doesn't guarantee it]. Bad footwork makes good volleying very difficult unless you have great hands like JMac and even then, you'd be volleying well in spite of your footwork, not because of it.

I agree that fast incomings make turning impossible. But one shouldn't start with fast incomings: start with slow balls so the proper technique can be learned and then adapted for higher speeds.

The wall has its place: it's great to practice fast exchanges like in doubles. It's not necessarily the best way to practice singles volleys. Maybe alternate with a GS then a volley rather than all volleys.
 

Shroud

G.O.A.T.
IMO this is wrong thinking and keeps players swinging away and increasing their errors. That someone was right!! The intermediate wants to close the net so he's right on top and can swing away and the ball will still go in. He thinks every volley should end the point. He's masking crap technique by crowding the net. See it all the time, esp. in warmups Not saying you have crap technique, but you're fighting the "smash away" mentality a bit I feel. Indeed you should be able to pop your volley deep to your baseline partner every d*mn time, even as he keeps cranking up the pace. Have him blast rockets right at you. Pop them right back. In a live ball situation, provided you've made a good approach the fact that you're at net means you just need to control the ball back with placement, not pace, you've already robbed them of time, and you win or take control of the point.
That's exactly my point. The placement you talk about in a live ball situation is never" deep to your baseline partner". It is usually an angle into the open court. So hitting deep to the baseline down the middle shot after shot is training the wrong thing. Maybe it's good for doubles but my volley started sucking because I was hitting it deep down the middle in practice and then in matches. Never was hitting angles.
 

S&V-not_dead_yet

Talk Tennis Guru
That's exactly my point. The placement you talk about in a live ball situation is never" deep to your baseline partner". It is usually an angle into the open court. So hitting deep to the baseline down the middle shot after shot is training the wrong thing. Maybe it's good for doubles but my volley started sucking because I was hitting it deep down the middle in practice and then in matches. Never was hitting angles.
No one said you have to do only one or the other; practice both.

The deep, DTM volley is great for a first volley in singles after the serve: it's high %, cuts down opponent angles, the puts the pressure squarely on his shoulders to pass you.

It's also a good defensive volley when you're stretched out wide and just want to reset the play.

The angled volley is great for shots after the first volley.
 

J011yroger

Talk Tennis Guru
That's exactly my point. The placement you talk about in a live ball situation is never" deep to your baseline partner". It is usually an angle into the open court. So hitting deep to the baseline down the middle shot after shot is training the wrong thing. Maybe it's good for doubles but my volley started sucking because I was hitting it deep down the middle in practice and then in matches. Never was hitting angles.
Does rallying up the middle ruin your groundstrokes in matches?

J
 
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