What’s your string times?

OldManStan

Rookie
On average for a 16x19 synthetic gut/ round poly, I can finish it in about 25 minutes.
16x19 16g shaped poly - 35 minutes
18x20 16g shapes poly - 40 minutes.

PB is 18:58 with a 16x19 BLX Pro Staff 95

All strung on a second hand LO machine.
 
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Karma Tennis

Hall of Fame
Do these times include ...

Cutting String out of old racquet.
Measuring out length of new string.
Mounting racquet on machine.
Actually stringing the racquet.
Removing racquet from stringing machine.
Checking string tension of freshly strung racquet.

From start to end, takes me about 55 minutes to do a 16x19 hybrid on an old LO machine 6 point old style mounting and fixed clamps.

I use a Stringway Cross Stringer Stringing tool to help me with the crosses. If I had to do it manually, it would probably take me an additional 15 to 20 minutes depending on the string used.
 

jim e

Legend
While it may not take a great amount of time actually stringing, but add time for:
Talking to player to get a feel for their game so you can then see if you can help their game by changing strings/ tension, etc. Sometimes I have a long discussion on this,
Then checking the integrity of the racquet for cracks, ( this has saved me over the years, as not too often, but you will find cracks once in a while and will need to notify player before anything is started) .
Check the grommets for cracks before and after strings are cut out. Very important!
Once I got a racquet with strings cut out, and once string tension was applied to one of the end main strings, a cracked grommet opened up the was not all that noticable without strings, and that crack ended up opening up and caused a set of vs gut to snap.Only happened once, but had to restart with another set of strings and replace the single grommet.
Mount racquet and measure string length.
Look up pattern of unfamiliar racquet.
Actually string it.
Straighten strings when finished.
Apply label with information on it.
Record data in log book including serial number.
This time all adds up.
Call up player that racquet is finished
Sometimes I get a player that I have a conversation with on strings and tension that is longer than it actually takes to string. Most of those players are grateful as before hand they had no idea of strings or tension as what it can do for the game.
Even if you are a fast stringer, the additional time adds up on the average. After all that figure what you are actually making per hour if you include all the time actually spent.
 
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Tregix

New User
Around 35 minutes from start to finish on a Stringway ML100 with flying clamps (16X19 round poly).

My son strings his racquet in less 25 minutes (16x19, Solinco Tour bit) on the same machine. He is MUCH faster than me for the crosses...
 

sportmac

Hall of Fame
I would guess average time is 35/45 minutes. I've never been in a hurry so setting/beating records isn't on the agenda. My goal is more to do it the same way every time so when I pull that other racquet out of the bag there are no surprises.

I wonder if the guys stringing at tournaments have to be able to do it consistently within a certain amount of time in order to get the job?
 

am1899

Hall of Fame
When i string at the retail shop, I can usually get 2 racquets done per hour, so long as there aren’t too many interruptions from the phone, customers, or colleagues. That time includes all aspects of the process - inspect, cut out, measure, cut, mount, string, label, and enter for payroll. If I string off hours - when we’re closed - often I can do 3 racquets in an hour.

When I string at home, I’m not always as efficient. But I’m in the comfort of my own home, so I don’t really care.

By the by, Brad Gilbert has said several times on television tennis coverage that tournament stringers can get a racquet done in 12 min. If that refers to the time from the first to the last pull, I can see that. If it includes anything else, using Brad’s vernacular, I’m calling Yahtzee on that.
 
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am1899

Hall of Fame
I wonder if the guys stringing at tournaments have to be able to do it consistently within a certain amount of time in order to get the job?
Speed is something the various stringing teams look for, although I doubt it’s the be all end all. I would guess that team leaders would prioritize consistency over speed. That said, a guy I know of earned a spot on the Wilson stringing team by winning the speed stringing contest at the USRSA symposium.
 
I have been using the Head TE - 3300 for years and it is a fantastic machine.
On average I string about 500 racquets per year.
I recently had three Wilson Clash 100 with me.
Strung with full poly string and 4 knots.
On the 3rd racket that was already on the machine, I had already cut the strings to length.
Since I could not really answer the question: "How fast can you string?" I started this attempt.
Then I started the stopwatch and strung this racket without excessive haste but full concentration.
When I took the racket off the machine, I stopped the time and it was 14 minutes to the second.
Some experts always claim that a fast stringer is a "soft" stringer.
I can't subscribe to that because I strung the other two racquets in about 18 minutes and the SBS was exactly the same.
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
Wilson Clash 16x19 Hyper G 17 g 4 knots @50#

Remove old label
Clean and disinfect frame
Remove dampener
Remove strings - Total time 2:59

Turn on machine
Mount frame
Measure 36’ (16 racket lengths) string - Total running time 4:06

String and tie off mains - Total ruining time 10:06

String and tie off crosses - Total running time 22:16

Dismount frame
Double check for misweaves and crossovers
Final straightening of strings
Replace dampener
Label and record job - Total running time 24:03
 
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MAX PLY

Hall of Fame
^^^I am going to guess that Irvin’s times are about average for an experienced stringer on a quality machine who is doing a quality job. I know when I string my personal frames (PS 97), I typically string three of them in about 70-75 minutes (but the strings have already been cut out and the frames cleaned). I suspect a pro tourney stringer is a bit faster on average but can also crank a couple out super quick if asked to.

But for most of us, it’s the end product that matter. . . Not how fast you produced it.
 

Mongolmike

Hall of Fame
15 year old Klipper dropweight, from cut out to last knot on a 16x19, @50 minutes normal speed, about 45 minutes if I'm in a hurry. No speed records, but l want consistency.

Edit: Just strung one as quick as I could. Cut out to tie off, 6:30p to 7:05 - 35 minutes.
 
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LHM

Rookie
for me appx 35-45 mins. This time includes cutting out old strings, checking the frame/grommets, cleaning the frame, measuring the new string out, mounting frame to the machine, stringing (usually 2 piece), removing the frame from the machine, stenciling the strings.
 

uk_skippy

Hall of Fame
By the by, Brad Gilbert has said several times on television tennis coverage that tournament stringers can get a racquet done in 12 min. If that refers to the time from the first to the last pull, I can see that. If it includes anything else, using Brad’s vernacular, I’m calling Yahtzee on that.
For reference, I was stringing for Rafa against Fed in WImby last year and someone timed how long it took for a Rafa on court. From the time it left the (Centre) Court, to the time it returned was 21 mins. The stringing room is on the other side of the site from the court. So timing inc rqt from court, being taken to the stringing room, cutting,mounting, stringing, stencilling, and returning back to the court.

So 12 mins is possible for everything, but only when it is needed; it is not the norm.
 

uk_skippy

Hall of Fame
^^^

TBH, I dont know if he used it.I cant recall what the score was when he sent it off. I would have strung at least 3 during that match for him. He starts with probably 3 new ones, and goes thru those 1st before starting on the racquets that were strung during the match.
 

esm

Hall of Fame
^^^

TBH, I dont know if he used it.I cant recall what the score was when he sent it off. I would have strung at least 3 during that match for him. He starts with probably 3 new ones, and goes thru those 1st before starting on the racquets that were strung during the match.
I am sure this may have been talked about before, but in my mind, this is kinda of cheating if the racquets gets restrung during a match? I do not long how long this has been going on? Since the introduction of poly on the tour or even earlier? (Genuine questions btw)
Although I think it is great to keep the professional strings on the job, but I thought it’d be only fair to prepare and bring what you have and complete the match.

(I will get my coat...)

ps - to get back to the topic, I usually spent between 35 - 45 mins on an eCP, for the stringing time only, in front of the TV and at the comfort of my home. Lol
 

Mongolmike

Hall of Fame
I am sure this may have been talked about before, but in my mind, this is kinda of cheating if the racquets gets restrung during a match? I do not long how long this has been going on? Since the introduction of poly on the tour or even earlier? (Genuine questions btw)
Although I think it is great to keep the professional strings on the job, but I thought it’d be only fair to prepare and bring what you have and complete the match.

(I will get my coat...)

ps - to get back to the topic, I usually spent between 35 - 45 mins on an eCP, for the stringing time only, in front of the TV and at the comfort of my home. Lol
Slightly different, but I was playing at my club indoors, and a friend broke a string early. He had a backup racquet, but it was completely different. During a change over he ran out to the lobby and asked the kid to restring his racquet and about 30 minutes later the kid brought it back to him on the court. (Sure hope he tipped the kid for the effort.)

That said, I didn't feel it was cheating or even kinda cheating. Just me, but it didn't bother me in the least. If a pro wants a stick restrung to match conditions or his play that day... fine. There are plenty of things that bug me more that they do than that (long bathroom breaks, not being called on the serve clock consistently, and when they had the ball kids bring their towel between every point - yeah covid!.... that stuff bugs me)
 

chic

Professional
When I was using my klipper I averaged 35 minutes for my racquets (volkl vsense 10 tour, 16x19). And for other frames was usually 40-45 minutes since I string them less often. Pumped one out in a rush in under 30, but that was half skill half luck lmao and probably not consistently repeatable.


Now that I have switched to an alpha pioneer DC plus, I'm usually at 50 minutes for my frames and 55 for others. I have had one or two string jobs get down to 45min, so hopefully I'm still speeding up.
 

loosegroove

Hall of Fame
Including cutting out old string, mounting, measuring out new string etc, it usually takes me 35 mins per racket on average with full poly. No rush. Normally drinking a beer
 
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am1899

Hall of Fame
For reference, I was stringing for Rafa against Fed in WImby last year and someone timed how long it took for a Rafa on court. From the time it left the (Centre) Court, to the time it returned was 21 mins. The stringing room is on the other side of the site from the court. So timing inc rqt from court, being taken to the stringing room, cutting,mounting, stringing, stencilling, and returning back to the court.

So 12 mins is possible for everything, but only when it is needed; it is not the norm.
Holy smokes Paul, that is fast. I stand corrected. My apologies to you and Lord Gilbert.
 
I am still relatively new to stringing, but my last string job I did for someone was a 2015 Blade 98 18 x 20 with Volkl Cyclone 16G strings. I had already cut out the strings the night before, but the actual stringing job took probably somewhere around 1 hour (not including setting up my machine and all the small stuff).

I was pretty happy about it as I strung his racquet as soon as I got up in the morning before work (so like 6:00 am) and shaped polys are something I still struggle with weaving in the crosses. Weaving is definitely the part where I can improve my time the most right now.
 

LOBALOT

Professional
I am still relatively new to stringing, but my last string job I did for someone was a 2015 Blade 98 18 x 20 with Volkl Cyclone 16G strings. I had already cut out the strings the night before, but the actual stringing job took probably somewhere around 1 hour (not including setting up my machine and all the small stuff).

I was pretty happy about it as I strung his racquet as soon as I got up in the morning before work (so like 6:00 am) and shaped polys are something I still struggle with weaving in the crosses. Weaving is definitely the part where I can improve my time the most right now.
I used to struggle learning to push weave first. I started pull weaving now and have gotten pretty quick at it so you should give that a shot first instead of learning to push weave first like I tried.

I just start my crosses being sure that I am starting my crosses under the first main vs. over. In this way when you get to the 2nd to last main (which is an under) you can simply grab the string and shove it into the grommet.

That has really helped cut my times. I don't like to race through a racquet but I think just working at a non-rushed pace from end-to-end I am probably at about 40 minutes including entering info in my log and confirming results on RacquetTune.

The weekend before last I had a hard stop and replaced the grommets on a blade 16x19 and restrung it in 45 minutes. I was flying through that racquet.
 
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am1899

Hall of Fame
Might be a stupid question ... Did he end up using that particular racquet during the match?

I imagine he did. But I often wonder whether it is used as a Tactic to confuse the opponent?
^^^

TBH, I dont know if he used it.I cant recall what the score was when he sent it off. I would have strung at least 3 during that match for him. He starts with probably 3 new ones, and goes thru those 1st before starting on the racquets that were strung during the match.
I am sure this may have been talked about before, but in my mind, this is kinda of cheating if the racquets gets restrung during a match? I do not long how long this has been going on? Since the introduction of poly on the tour or even earlier? (Genuine questions btw)
Although I think it is great to keep the professional strings on the job, but I thought it’d be only fair to prepare and bring what you have and complete the match.

(I will get my coat...)

ps - to get back to the topic, I usually spent between 35 - 45 mins on an eCP, for the stringing time only, in front of the TV and at the comfort of my home. Lol
Heh. My far less interesting story goes like this. I was visiting with one of my good friends, who helps run a men’s futures/ITF in my hometown. There was 1 match left on court, and they split sets. One of the players suddenly breaks 2 strings, and is apparently down to his last racquet. He gives 2 racquets to the chair to have them restrung. At that moment my friend was just about to leave. But him being the only guy on staff still on site who could string, he realized he had to stay. He was not a happy guy. So I decided to offer to string one of the racquets to hopefully cut his time in half - fortunately, their pro shop has 2 machines. We both finished a shade under 20 min - 16x19 strike FB adrenaline.

Just as my friend started walking the finished frames back to the court, we see one of the players walk toward us, into the clubhouse. The match was over. LOL, good thing we rushed!

@esm i don’t think it’s cheating, and it’s been going on for as long as I can remember. Having a freshly strung racquet, right off the machine, is not necessarily an advantage - especially if the player is accustomed to letting freshly strung racquets sit for some period of time before playing with them.

I wonder if “on courts” have even reduced a bit in recent years - with the prevalence of polyester, and players not breaking as often. Then again, there are guys like Nishikori who spend the whole match fiddling with tension. And I suppose the men in particular don’t play with 1 stick nearly as long as they used to....so of their match gets extended, possible they would need some “on courts.” So maybe it’s a wash.
 
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I used to struggle learning to push weave first. I started pull weaving now and have gotten pretty quick at it so you should give that a shot first instead of learning to push weave first like I tried.

I just start my mains being sure that I am starting my crosses under the first main vs. over. In this way when you get to the 2nd to last main (which is an under) you can simply grab the string and shove it into the grommet.

That has really helped cut my times. I don't like to race through a racquet but I think just working at a non-rushed pace from end-to-end I am probably at about 40 minutes including entering info in my log and confirming results on RacquetTune.

The weekend before last I had a hard stop and replaced the grommets on a blade 16x19 and restrung it in 45 minutes. I was flying though that racquet.
Yeah, I probably should look up different pull weaving techniques. I sort of alternate pushing and pulling right now and I don't think that is helping me.

In regards to starting over the mains or under the mains, I still don't really understand that. I usually just start with whatever and work off that. It has definitely bit me in the ass before though because the Blade 18x20 has a cross grommet really close to the main and I spent probably 3 or 4 minutes just trying to get the goddamn string in the hole.

I think my record right now is around 45 minutes racquet on to racquet off using really slick strings that are easier to cross. And I record the tension using an app TennisTension for Android, but honestly, I only use it to track tension decay because the numbers are so wildly off.
 

am1899

Hall of Fame
Probably the best advice I was ever given with regard to push weaving was (assuming top down cross stringing):

1. Weave one ahead
2. Weave an angle, in a “V pattern” - first half of the cross toward the throat, second half back up toward the grommet you’re going to feed through.

All of that said, push weaving isn’t necessarily for everyone, nor is it suitable for every occasion IME. Whatever does the job.
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
In regards to starting over the mains or under the mains, I still don't really understand that. I usually just start with whatever and work off that. It has definitely bit me before because the Blade 18x20 has a cross grommet really close to the main and I spent probably 3 or 4 minutes just trying to get the string in the hole.
The Blade 18x20 can pose some problems because the 19th and 18th crosses are both pretty close to the mains. For the 19th cross there is no issue going into the grommet for the 19th cross but going into the grommet after string the 19 cross I like to get the string on top with a point to get it in the grommet. You need to tie off on the 18th cross (12T) so I prefer to have the 18th cross (even numbered cross) on top of the intersecting main. I generally Pre-weave the top three crosses and I start with 3rd cross (odd numbered cross) by going under the outer main so my anchor string end up on top.

if I’m string a 16x19 frame where the bottom cross 19th or odd number ties off on the 6th Main I want the 6th main on top I start weaving the 3rd main going under the even numbered mains. If there is no tie off where I see I’m not going to have an issue I start by going under the outer so after pre-weaving the top three I always start crosses going over Because I find it easier more often than not.
 
The Blade 18x20 can pose some problems because the 19th and 18th crosses are both pretty close to the mains. For the 19th cross there is no issue going into the grommet for the 19th cross but going into the grommet after string the 19 cross I like to get the string on top with a point to get it in the grommet. You need to tie off on the 18th cross (12T) so I prefer to have the 18th cross (even numbered cross) on top of the intersecting main. I generally Pre-weave the top three crosses and I start with 3rd cross (odd numbered cross) by going under the outer main so my anchor string end up on top.
Not going to lie, I have never tied off on 12T for my 18x20 Blade. I have always tied off on 9 for my mains and 7 for my crosses...
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
Not going to lie, I have never tied off on 12T for my 18x20 Blade. I have always tied off on 9 for my mains and 7 for my crosses...
it doesn’t matter, start crosses going under the outer main with the 3rd cross so your anchor string (7th main) is on of the bottom Intersecting cross (19th cross.) that way you can tie your knot on the 7th main between the 19th and 18th crosses and when you cinch up the knot it slides right up to the grommet.
 

First Serve

New User
Clean and disinfect frame
Remove dampener
Remove strings - Total time 2:59
@Irvin
Can you describe the clean and disinfect frame process? Cleaning because of environmental grime and player's sweat and oils? My local shop doesnt do that, but I can see this would be added value and care.

Disinfecting, because of COVID? I have not heard of this being done at local shops. Interesting.

To OP, I am slow and take my time. Start to finish over 1 hour but under 2 hours.
 

OldManStan

Rookie
Not going to lie, I have never tied off on 12T for my 18x20 Blade. I have always tied off on 9 for my mains and 7 for my crosses...
Funny enough, I just strung a 18x20 blade and I thought it looked odd when it said to tie off at 7T and 12T for mains and crosses respectively.
 

OldManStan

Rookie
@Irvin
Can you describe the clean and disinfect frame process? Cleaning because of environmental grime and player's sweat and oils? My local shop doesnt do that, but I can see this would be added value and care.

Disinfecting, because of COVID? I have not heard of this being done at local shops. Interesting.

To OP, I am slow and take my time. Start to finish over 1 hour but under 2 hours.
Not Irvin, but for racquets that I've done this year, I use blue shop towels with some 70% isopropyl alcohol and do a quick wipe down.
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
@Irvin
Can you describe the clean and disinfect frame process? Cleaning because of environmental grime and player's sweat and oils? My local shop doesnt do that, but I can see this would be added value and care.

Disinfecting, because of COVID? I have not heard of this being done at local shops. Interesting.

To OP, I am slow and take my time. Start to finish over 1 hour but under 2 hours.
I mixed my own at first with bleach, dish soap, and water. Then found Clorox Clean-Up


 

esm

Hall of Fame
I mixed my own at first with bleach, dish soap, and water. Then found Clorox Clean-Up


Good one. I am lazy so I just use the already made antibacterial wipes. Lol
 
Funny enough, I just strung a 18x20 blade and I thought it looked odd when it said to tie off at 7T and 12T for mains and crosses respectively.
Yeah, I was looking at the stringing pattern online and it didn't seem nice to me. I took a look at a blade that was done by 2 different experienced stringers who I trust and respect, and they tied off at 9T and 7T so I followed suit.

Maybe I'll try the Wilson recommended stringing pattern, but honestly, I don't see the point considering I have never had problems with the way I do it now and I hate tying off on that grommet. I also thought the general advice was to always tie off on mains, but then again, maybe I am just making that up.
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
Yeah, I was looking at the stringing pattern online and it didn't seem nice to me. I took a look at a blade that was done by 2 different experienced stringers who I trust and respect, and they tied off at 9T and 7T so I followed suit.

Maybe I'll try the Wilson recommended stringing pattern, but honestly, I don't see the point considering I have never had problems with the way I do it now and I hate tying off on that grommet. I also thought the general advice was to always tie off on mains, but then again, maybe I am just making that up.
I don’t think you will have an issue either way. The only question is do you want to tie off the bottom cross on a main @7T or a cross at 12T. 6 of one or a half dozen of the other. But I would not go out of the way to tie off the mains on different grommets, increase the length of untensioned string on the outside, and create triple strings in the grommet channels on the outside of the frame. Those triple strings running side by side is a good way to manufacturer crossovers.
 

zaskar1

Semi-Pro
since i string mainly for myself and my wife, who seldom breaks strings( two times a year)
she plays 4-5 times a week.
around 50-55 min
any faster, and i misweaved and have to take it apart and start over again
i do shaped and round poly, and multi filament (for the wife)
tying the knots is the most difficult part of the process, especially the poly
if i do anything for friends, it takes additional time to adjust the LO machine
z
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
Yeah, I probably should look up different pull weaving techniques. I sort of alternate pushing and pulling right now and I don't think that is helping me.

In regards to starting over the mains or under the mains, I still don't really understand that. I usually just start with whatever and work off that. It has definitely bit me in the ass before though because the Blade 18x20 has a cross grommet really close to the main and I spent probably 3 or 4 minutes just trying to get the goddamn string in the hole.

I think my record right now is around 45 minutes racquet on to racquet off using really slick strings that are easier to cross. And I record the tension using an app TennisTension for Android, but honestly, I only use it to track tension decay because the numbers are so wildly off.
Here is what I was talking about the other day. I just strung a Wilson PS 97L 18x16. In the first photo you can see the 14th cross goes underr the 9th main but it is easy to insert the cross into the grommet from the top. The 15th cross goes under the 8th (anchor string) so I can easily tie my knot between the 14th and 15th crosses if needed.

On the opposite side the 15th cross again goes over the main close to the grommet so I can easily get the string in the grommet from above.

After cinching up the bottom knot on the 8th main because the anchor string was on top the knot easily slides right up to the grommet.

The mains were tied off on the 7th mains so there is no issue with space to tie off and the top cross was tied off on the 5th main so again a non issue.


Many stringers would consider this a ‘natural 1 piece but I prefer to string them as 2 piece to balance tension on the outer mains. 2 extra knots is not a big time difference. The string was Forten nylon 15L at 56#

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 
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zipplock

Hall of Fame
Had to string 2 rackets today, so I thought i'd time myself. Cut out both rackets strings, clean and disinfected the racket, strung both, and adjusted some of the strings. Total time 44 mins
That's fast. I was 40 minutes on my Klipper, am 30 minutes on my Gamma X-ELS.
 

jhupper

Rookie
Don't usually pay much attention but last night had 2 APDs arrive. Were received strung. Exactly an hour later doorbell rang to pick back up and the second was just getting the final straighten so 30 minutes all in.
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
Babolat Pure Strike 18x20 Lux ALU Power 125 @59#

Remove old label
Clean and disinfect frame
Remove strings - Total time 3:12

Turn on machine
Mount frame
Measure 37’ (16 racket lengths + 1 foot) string - Total running time 4:20

String and tie off mains - Total ruining time 12:20

String and tie off crosses - Total running time 27:18

Dismount frame
Double check for misweaves and crossovers
Final straightening of strings
Label and record job - Total running time 28:00

It takes me longer to weave in a rubber band than it does to weave a cross. This client used to tie in a #64 rubber band until I started weaving it in for him.

 
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struggle

Legend
Not sure. I don't rush for time and it's unimportant as I'm not in the stringing room at the US Open.

Likely 30 minutes if i cruise but i usually i take longer.
 

jhupper

Rookie
Babolat Pure Strike 18x20 Lux ALU Power 125 @59#

Remove old label
Clean and disinfect frame
Remove strings - Total time 3:12

Turn on machine
Mount frame
Measure 37’ (16 racket lengths + 1 foot) string - Total running time 4:20

String and tie off mains - Total ruining time 12:20

String and tie off crosses - Total running time 27:18

Dismount frame
Double check for misweaves and crossovers
Final straightening of strings
Label and record job - Total running time 28:00

It takes me longer to weave in a rubber band than it does to weave a cross. This client used to tie in a #64 rubber band until I started weaving it in for him.

I'm shocked you'd partake in such blatantly illegal activities like placing a dampening device there.
 
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