What are some of the saddest and most depressing movies you've watched?

Sabrina

Hall of Fame
This one. Not a movie, it's an anime series but still.

28c8a5c249e178409493e02be37eeaca.jpg
 

Sysyphus

Talk Tennis Guru
Love a good bleak or melancholy movie every now and then. It can serve a kind of cathartic effect in a sense.

The French have a knack for creating poignant tristesse.

Such as Amour (2012), the story of an elderly pair whose existence is rocked when the wife suffers a stroke. The ending will kill you. It is a beautiful and harrowing picture, all too real.


Or some of Robert Bresson's films. Au hasard Balthazar (1966) chronicles indignities suffered by a donkey who is passed on from owner to owner, and the pitiful fates of those around him as well. Mouchette (1967) likewise lays out the sad life of a girl in the French countryside suffering similar debasement and iniquity.



Then you have all the Holocaust movies – such as The Pianist, Schindler's List and La vita e bella – which quite invariably are very sad. Because, you know, the Holocaust is—well, 'sad' doesn't really begin to do it justice.
 

Shaolin

G.O.A.T.
The movie Watership Down made me super sad as a young boy. I just remember rabbits fighting and it made me really upset. To this day there is no way I'd watch it.
 

NonP

Legend
"Depressing" or even "sad" is not the word I'd use to describe my picks, but I nominate two towering Japanese masterworks: Mizoguchi's Sansho the Bailiff and Kurosawa's Ran.

Before I get to the former I should fess up to one thing: to this day I can't recall being more irritated by another film of a comparable caliber than I was when encountering The Story of the Last Chrysanthemums and The Life of Oharu for the first time. Even to this viewer who spent much of his early life in the (Far) East both films felt at times to traffic and wallow in female sacrifice rather than rue and extol it at once, and for a long time I'd believed and maintained that Mizoguchi's great heroines were as enriched as they were limited by his lower-middle-class background (due to declining fortunes his family was forced to sell off his older sister Suzuko as a geisha, a profoundly traumatic experience which stayed with him all his life).

So it wasn't until my second viewing of Sansho that I gained my full appreciation of the eldest of the four preeminent Japanese sensei (the widely acknowledged trinity of Mizoguchi, Ozu and Kurosawa plus Naruse). Now Mizoguchi's greatest feature (its only serious rival is Last Chrysanthemums) manages to bypass his wronged-woman syndrome by - spoiler alert - killing off the hero's sister fairly early, but Anju turns out to be Sonya to Zushiō's Raskolnikov even in death which remains unbeknownst to him until after he comes full circle as Governor of Tango and abolishes slavery into which he and his sister were sold as children. In fact Anju's noble self-sacrifice which begins well before her suicide is the turning point of Zushiō's transformation, which is completed by his tearful reunion with his nearly blind mother and his heartfelt admission that he's been true to his father's credo of mercy.

It is that lofty treatment of female subjugation which gives this film ostensibly about a male hero's spiritual pilgrimage its richness and depth. And no other filmmaker has explored the myriad dimensions of death more fully or movingly. If this isn't the very greatest film ever made, it's close:


I've been a keen admirer of Kurosawa's loose adaptation of King Lear for a long time, and this most nihilistic of all plays struck a deep chord with the the aging master who proceeded to direct, according to Kael, "perhaps the biggest piece of conceptual art ever made." Throne of Blood, Kurosawa's other extraordinary Shakespeare adaptation (based on Macbeth), took a decidedly unsentimental tack by running the risk of canceling out human sentiment altogether. Thankfully he keeps himself from conflating nihilism with fatalism in his second go-round, and the result is magnificent, intimate, vibrant and static all at once, if perhaps still easier to admire than to love. Lady Kaede (Harada Mieko - as usual I'm putting the Japanese surname first) as goddess of vengeance is one of the most terrifying villains in all cinema, and the final shot of the blind Tsurumaru (Nomura Mansai) overlooking the ruins, now deprived of his sole talisman and accompanied only by Takemitsu's Mahleresque score, is one of utter and unforgettable devastation.

If there was one elephantine film Manny Farber could approve of it would be Kurosawa's greatest epic. An absolute essential:


And some more candidates:

Million Dollar Baby - really bleak in parts.

Million_Dollar_Baby_poster.jpg

Eastwood's movies have always carried an ounce of determinism, probably none more than this one. That's probably my biggest misgiving about MDB, but I'm also a consistent pro-lifer (philosophically at any rate) and don't care for Eastwood's defense of his film with a disingenuous analogy between his Harry Callahan persona and his Frankie Dunn character. I hate to agree with Michael Medved on anything but he was absolutely right to object to the movie's misleading marketing.

MDB is still in some ways his most mature outing to date (though I prefer Letters from Iwo Jima among his more recent efforts) and I will defend it against charges of being pro-euthanasia. I just wish its director and male protagonist spoke with the same voice.

Really saddest and most depressing since we are now living it :(

Soderbergh still gets to indulge misanthropy and the world is saved by a handful of heroes standing as a bulwark against the unruly masses. Hardly depressing.

City Lights (1931)
Love that movie. The ending was really solid!

Only "solid"? It's arguably the greatest ending ever! In fact the only concluding close-ups that can challenge it are those of Naruse's When a Woman Ascends the Stairs and Yearning.
 

TheGhostOfAgassi

Talk Tennis Guru
Requiem for a Dream

Sent from my SM-G965W using Tapatalk
I watched this in the cinema.
Makeup not a good idea.


Juliette Binoche playing a journalist reporting from Afghanistan. Seeing how kids become suicide bombers in jihad, to really take that in, it’s actually happening. Left a sadness and hopelessness lasting for days. If thinking about that movie too long, can still cry a bit.
 

TheGhostOfAgassi

Talk Tennis Guru
"Depressing" or even "sad" is not the word I'd use to describe my picks, but I nominate two towering Japanese masterworks: Mizoguchi's Sansho the Bailiff and Kurosawa's Ran.

Before I get to the former I should fess up to one thing: to this day I can't recall being more irritated by another film of a comparable caliber than I was when encountering The Story of the Last Chrysanthemums and The Life of Oharu for the first time. Even to this viewer who spent much of his early life in the (Far) East both films felt at times to traffic and wallow in female sacrifice rather than rue and extol it at once, and for a long time I'd believed and maintained that Mizoguchi's great heroines were as enriched as they were limited by his lower-middle-class background (due to declining fortunes his family was forced to sell off his older sister Suzuko as a geisha, a profoundly traumatic experience which stayed with him all his life).

So it wasn't until my second viewing of Sansho that I gained my full appreciation of the eldest of the four preeminent Japanese sensei (the widely acknowledged trinity of Mizoguchi, Ozu and Kurosawa plus Naruse). Now Mizoguchi's greatest feature (its only serious rival is Last Chrysanthemums) manages to bypass his wronged-woman syndrome by - spoiler alert - killing off the hero's sister fairly early, but Anju turns out to be Sonya to Zushiō's Raskolnikov even in death which remains unbeknownst to him until after he comes full circle as Governor of Tango and abolishes slavery into which he and his sister were sold as children. In fact Anju's noble self-sacrifice which begins well before her suicide is the turning point of Zushiō's transformation, which is completed by his tearful reunion with his nearly blind mother and his heartfelt admission that he's been true to his father's credo of mercy.

It is that lofty treatment of female subjugation which gives this film ostensibly about a male hero's spiritual pilgrimage its richness and depth. And no other filmmaker has explored the myriad dimensions of death more fully or movingly. If this isn't the very greatest film ever made, it's close:


I've been a keen admirer of Kurosawa's loose adaptation of King Lear for a long time, and this most nihilistic of all plays struck a deep chord with the the aging master who proceeded to direct, according to Kael, "perhaps the biggest piece of conceptual art ever made." Throne of Blood, Kurosawa's other extraordinary Shakespeare adaptation (based on Macbeth), took a decidedly unsentimental tack by running the risk of canceling out human sentiment altogether. Thankfully he keeps himself from conflating nihilism with fatalism in his second go-round, and the result is magnificent, intimate, vibrant and static all at once, if perhaps still easier to admire than to love. Lady Kaede (Harada Mieko - as usual I'm putting the Japanese surname first) as goddess of vengeance is one of the most terrifying villains in all cinema, and the final shot of the blind Tsurumaru (Nomura Mansai) overlooking the ruins, now deprived of his sole talisman and accompanied only by Takemitsu's Mahleresque score, is one of utter and unforgettable devastation.

If there was one elephantine film Manny Farber could approve of it would be Kurosawa's greatest epic. An absolute essential:


And some more candidates:



Eastwood's movies have always carried an ounce of determinism, probably none more than this one. That's probably my biggest misgiving about MDB, but I'm also a consistent pro-lifer (philosophically at any rate) and don't care for Eastwood's defense of his film with a disingenuous analogy between his Harry Callahan persona and his Frankie Dunn character. I hate to agree with Michael Medved on anything but he was absolutely right to object to the movie's misleading marketing.

MDB is still in some ways his most mature outing to date (though I prefer Letters from Iwo Jima among his more recent efforts) and I will defend it against charges of being pro-euthanasia. I just wish its director and male protagonist spoke with the same voice.



Soderbergh still gets to indulge misanthropy and the world is saved by a handful of heroes standing as a bulwark against the unruly masses. Hardly depressing.




Only "solid"? It's arguably the greatest ending ever! In fact the only concluding close-ups that can challenge it are those of Naruse's When a Woman Ascends the Stairs and Yearning.
Have you seen this?
It’s a German Japanese movie. I was in this movie club at the time so I saw many not so known movies. This is one movie that made the greatest impression in my life. The cinematics (or the filming, not sure what it’s called) it’s really beautiful. It’s a very strong story, extremely touching. Takes patience to watch it as it’s “deep”. I watched in the cinema and this is the movie I cried the most to ever. Just have to let it flow.
Life.... but how to live it?
 

Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
Dancer in the Dark.
That's probably the most depressing Lars von Trier film, but "Breaking the Waves" and "Melancholia" are close. Pretty much all of von Trier's films are depressing, and he suffered from depression himself.
breaking-the-waves-1996.gif


tumblr_o3xgb5qmNz1tmalgmo1_500.gifv

tumblr_msmbhefajM1s89mq8o1_500.gif



From 2007:

Dark days for film-making world as depression lays Von Trier low
Jason Burke
Sat 12 May 2007 19.04 EDT

Film director Lars Von Trier, renowned for dark, psychologically difficult, artistically pioneering films, has been left unable to work following a serious depression and is doubtful about when he would be able to return to filmmaking, it was revealed yesterday.

In an interview published in a Danish newspaper, Von Trier, known for films such as Breaking The Waves and Dogville, which starred Nicole Kidman, said the aftermath of his depression had left him 'like a blank sheet of paper'. 'It's very strange for me, because I've always had at least three projects in my head at one time,' he added.

Von Trier, 51, was admitted to a Danish hospital at the start of the year. He said he had lost focus and took no pleasure in his work. 'You can't make a film and be depressed at the same time,' he was quoted as saying. 'They say that it can take a couple of years to recover after a depression. But let's see.'
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2007/may/13/film.filmnews
 

Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
Two more depressing films:

"Come and See" is a Russian film about the horrors of war. It's like a fevered nightmare.

"Lilya 4-Ever" is a film by Swedish director Lukas Moodysson, who made the popular film "Show Me Love." It's about a young Russian woman coerced into prostitution when her mother abandons her. Her life only gets worse when she moves to Sweden.
 

Vcore89

Talk Tennis Guru
Here's a baker's dozen:

1. Blue Valentine
2. Melancholia
3. Blue is the Warmest Color
4. Marley and Me
5. Toy Story 3
6. Empire of the Sun
7. Leaving Las Vegas
8. Manchester by the Sea
9. The Boy in the Striped Pajamas
10. 12 Years a Slave
11. What's Eating Gilbert Grape
12. Boys Don't Cry
13. The Notebook
 

Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
"My Own Private Idaho" is sad and depressing in its own right, but much more so since River's death two years later on Halloween in 1993, especially considering the nature of his death.

 

rommil

Legend
I am a big Ozu fan. Many of his films deal with loneliness and alienation, especially with elderly characters. His long takes and slow pace have a poetic quality.

I love his work and the way he executes it. Thing is , Tokyo Story was done in 1953 or so but it feels so current and now, without it feeling enforced or contrived to make you feel sad.

A side note , the actor that plays the father is awesome, just an opinion. There’s something with his acting or mannerism that draws me in, and maybe unintentionally light and comical( maybe it’s just my read on it)
 

NonP

Legend
Have you seen this?
It’s a German Japanese movie. I was in this movie club at the time so I saw many not so known movies. This is one movie that made the greatest impression in my life. The cinematics (or the filming, not sure what it’s called) it’s really beautiful. It’s a very strong story, extremely touching. Takes patience to watch it as it’s “deep”. I watched in the cinema and this is the movie I cried the most to ever. Just have to let it flow.
Life.... but how to live it?

Afraid I'm not acquainted with Doris Dörrie at all and will check this out.

Also from the looks of it I think you'll appreciate Naruse's When a Woman Ascends the Stairs and Yearning:

(no clip with English subs, alas)

They're my all-time favorite movies, and the only reason why I've yet to undertake an in-depth analysis of both is because Naruse isn't a household name outside his native Japan - largely due to his clinical stoicism as opposed to Ozu's more generous humanism and to the lower-middle-class status of most of his characters - and I want to do this neglected master full justice. So kinda in your wheelhouse! (I'd like to add both films are exquisite tearjerkers, but while they certainly won't cheer you up cathartic release isn't what Naruse is interested in.)

"Come and See" is a Russian film about the horrors of war. It's like a fevered nightmare.

Moose saw the 4k restoration earlier this year and raved (in a PM) about it. Told him I'd long thought of Klimov as something of a Pierre Curie, LOL. Really should check this out one of these days.

"My Own Private Idaho" is sad and depressing in its own right, but much more so since River's death two years later on Halloween in 1993, especially considering the nature of his death.

Probably Van Sant's best feature, but my fave ending of his has gotta be this:


Safe to say no more powerful setting of Desmond Dekker's evergreen "Israelites" exists in cinema. I'd love to see this Van Sant again.

I am a big Ozu fan. Many of his films deal with loneliness and alienation, especially with elderly characters. His long takes and slow pace have a poetic quality.

Not all Ozu! Many of his silents including the sublime I Was Born, But . . . could hardly be pigeonholed as "slow," and how about Dragnet Girl, a gangster film(!) that puts its more celebrated peers to shame:


I love his work and the way he executes it. Thing is , Tokyo Story was done in 1953 or so but it feels so current and now, without it feeling enforced or contrived to make you feel sad.

A side note , the actor that plays the father is awesome, just an opinion. There’s something with his acting or mannerism that draws me in, and maybe unintentionally light and comical( maybe it’s just my read on it)

You probably have already seen this, but if not make sure to catch McCarey's incomparable tearjerker (and his own favorite of his works) Make Way for Tomorrow, which along with the Ozu is the greatest film exploration of the cruelties society inflicts upon the elderly:


I'm basically going through all my personal faves, LOL. Maybe I should just quote the whole thing:

I was going to sort my picks by my fave directors but I like your approach even better. Here it is, my top 10-ish (see below) followed by a close second/third in its respective genre:

Comedy - City Lights (Chaplin) / Sylvia Scarlett (Cukor) / I Was Born, But . . . (Ozu)
Drama, Contemporary - When a Woman Ascends the Stairs (Naruse) / Yearning (Naruse) / Make Way for Tomorrow (McCarey)
Drama, Period - Gertrud (Dreyer) / The Magnificent Ambersons (Welles)
Epic - Sansho the Bailiff (Mizoguchi) / The Leopard (Visconti)
Horror - Kuroneko (Shindo) / Vampyr (Dreyer)
Literary Adaptation - Ran (Kurosawa) / Great Expectations (Lean) / The Best Years of Our Lives (Wyler - yes I understand it's based on a novella written specifically for the picture)
Musical - The Young Girls of Rochefort (Demy) / A Star Is Born (Cukor) / The Band Wagon (Minnelli)
Romance - Children of Paradise (Carné) / The Earrings of Madame de . . . (Ophüls)
Science Fiction - Stalker (Tarkovsky) / A.I. Artificial Intelligence (Spielberg/Kubrick)
Thriller - M (Lang) / The Night of the Hunter (Laughton)

Obviously some of the categories overlap but these are more or less what I'd come up with even if I didn't have to restrict myself to each genre. And as you can see I gave moi allowance for one more entry in four of the categories as it proved too painful to leave them out. A best-films list without an Ozu simply felt wrong, while McCarey's unsung masterpiece remains, with the only arguable exception of Ozu's better-known Tokyo Story, the single greatest on-screen depiction of the cruelties society inflicts upon the elderly. (The director himself considered it his best film, and indeed when he accepted his Oscar for Best Director for The Awful Truth which was also released in 1937 he quipped, "Thanks, but you gave it to me for the wrong picture.") I've expressed my love for Wyler's almost equally unheralded picture (though I doubt that's the case anymore) in another thread, and the Minnelli classic deserves a shout-out for all time for this sexiest/coolest of all sequences in cinema:


Kael once groused about the Cyd Charisse character's balletic pretensions before adding that all is forgiven once she flaunts those perfectly sculpted legs. No argument from me!!!

The last shot of The Breaking Point(1950) is one of the saddest things I’ve ever seen.

You prefer it to Hawks' To Have and Have Not?!!!
 

van_Loederen

Professional
When watching The Road, I found it to be very depressing. Out of all the post apocalyptic movies I've seen, this one felt the most real.
in the described postapocal world, i would believe that in all the bigger cities societies emerged. humans won't get that lost.
raiders may be present on the roads indeed,
but people wouldn't need to expose their children to dangers like depicted in that movie, i think.

in a postapo world, imo raiders wouldn't have opportunities like in those movies. they didn't have them in pre-industrial times and won't get them back.
raiders may very well become a problem on the roads, but even without petrol there might exist relatively established and secure traveling methods.

i totally doubt that in a postapo world everyone would be alone and the societies would get lost like in MadMax or so.
even in prehistoric times, societies were bigger than road raiders.
(i understand that this idea is not interesting for filmmakers.)
 

Midaso240

Legend
I think the answer depends on the person and their life experiences,I have seen most of the titles mentioned in here and some left me with a smile on my face more than anything else. I would say 2 of the first ones that come to mind are both female directed: Kimberly Peirce's Boys Don't Cry (1999) and Lynne Ramsay's masterful We Need To Talk About Kevin (2011). Both leave me with an uneasy feeling that takes days to pass. I could list hundreds more,but I'll leave it for now. I've had depression most of my life,so these types of movies are definitely the ones that have the biggest impact on me...
 
Night, Mother from 1986, starring Sissy Spacek and Anne Bancroft, was a pretty dark movie that made quite an impression on me. Below is the synopsis from IMDb. The acting was truly terrific.
https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0090556/plotsummary?ref_=tt_ov_pl

Jessie Cates, an unemployed epileptic with a failed marriage and a deeply troubled son, tells her mother, Thelma, that she plans to kill herself before the night is over. Thelma tries to convince her daughter life is worth living, but Jessie remains resolute.

Directed by Tom Moore, this gripping film was adapted from the Pulitzer Prize-winning play by Marsha Norman.

A dark, tear-jerking drama, this film stars Anne Bancroft (Thelma), who was nominated for Best Actress in a Motion Picture (Drama) for "'night, Mother".
 
You probably have already seen this, but if not make sure to catch McCarey's incomparable tearjerker (and his own favorite of his works) Make Way for Tomorrow, which along with the Ozu is the greatest film exploration of the cruelties society inflicts upon the elderly:


That sounds like a total heartbreaker!
 

Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
Afraid I'm not acquainted with Doris Dörrie at all and will check this out.

Also from the looks of it I think you'll appreciate Naruse's When a Woman Ascends the Stairs and Yearning:

(no clip with English subs, alas)

They're my all-time favorite movies, and the only reason why I've yet to undertake an in-depth analysis of both is because Naruse isn't a household name outside his native Japan - largely due to his clinical stoicism as opposed to Ozu's more generous humanism and to the lower-middle-class status of most of his characters - and I want to do this neglected master full justice. So kinda in your wheelhouse! (I'd like to add both films are exquisite tearjerkers, but while they certainly won't cheer you up cathartic release isn't what Naruse is interested in.)



Moose saw the 4k restoration earlier this year and raved (in a PM) about it. Told him I'd long thought of Klimov as something of a Pierre Curie, LOL. Really should check this out one of these days.



Probably Van Sant's best feature, but my fave ending of his has gotta be this:


Safe to say no more powerful setting of Desmond Dekker's evergreen "Israelites" exists in cinema. I'd love to see this Van Sant again.



Not all Ozu! Many of his silents including the sublime I Was Born, But . . . could hardly be pigeonholed as "slow," and how about Dragnet Girl, a gangster film(!) that puts its more celebrated peers to shame:




You probably have already seen this, but if not make sure to catch McCarey's incomparable tearjerker (and his own favorite of his works) Make Way for Tomorrow, which along with the Ozu is the greatest film exploration of the cruelties society inflicts upon the elderly:


I'm basically going through all my personal faves, LOL. Maybe I should just quote the whole thing:





You prefer it to Hawks' To Have and Have Not?!!!
Ozu often began scenes with the camera on an empty room before his characters entered, and would linger on the empty space after they left. This was to express the transient nature of his characters; the people left, but the space endures. The passage of time was a constant theme in his films. Plots were not as important as contemplation, which could make his films feel slow.

He had some idiosyncrasies that gave his films a stagnant feel, like almost always shooting with a 50mm lens, and shooting at a low angle, with the camera at the eye level of someone sitting on a tatami mat. He would also often break the 180-degree rule, which is usually followed to help the audience orient the characters in space.

An interesting piece of trivia is that Ozu liked to drink large quantities of sake with his collaborators while working on screenplays, and would mark the progress with empty bottles. You may have noticed that characters are often drinking in his films.
 

DSH

Talk Tennis Guru
Nicola and Matteo Carati are two brothers of Rome, who live the years from 1966 to 2000 and all the events which have signed this period. They begin their adventure, helping Giorgia, a young girl confined in an asylum. Then, after the flood of Florence, Nicola meets Giulia a talented piano player with a dangerous sympathy for the BR. Matteo, a rebel spirit entered in the police, will find the optimistic photographer Mirella. These four characters and many others will cross the years of terrorism and Tangentopoli.

 

Azure

G.O.A.T.
This.
This movie breaks you apart and you won't be able to collect yourself back for sometime.

I also found all Kieslowski movies to be sad and heartbreaking. @Azure would agree.
Yes. Kieslowski is a master at this too. I think one of the Dekalog stories - the father's search for his boy falling into the ice water is very poignant.
 

Azure

G.O.A.T.
Nicola and Matteo Carati are two brothers of Rome, who live the years from 1966 to 2000 and all the events which have signed this period. They begin their adventure, helping Giorgia, a young girl confined in an asylum. Then, after the flood of Florence, Nicola meets Giulia a talented piano player with a dangerous sympathy for the BR. Matteo, a rebel spirit entered in the police, will find the optimistic photographer Mirella. These four characters and many others will cross the years of terrorism and Tangentopoli.

This is a beautiful movie but not really sad except in the mid portion with the tragedy with Matteo. The ending was liberating and gave a big closure to what was a long movie :)
 

zipplock

Hall of Fame
This.
This movie breaks you apart and you won't be able to collect yourself back for sometime.

I also found all Kieslowski movies to be sad and heartbreaking. @Azure would agree.
Kieslowski was a genius. One of my favorite movies of all time is The Double Life of Veronique. The soundtrack fit the film so well I bought it. To this day it's the only film soundtrack I've purchased.

If you like this style there's another amazing film called Before the Rain, a Macedonian film.
 

donquijote

G.O.A.T.
Kieslowski was a genius. One of my favorite movies of all time is The Double Life of Veronique. The soundtrack fit the film so well I bought it. To this day it's the only film soundtrack I've purchased.

If you like this style there's another amazing film called Before the Rain, a Macedonian film.
Yep, that's a great film.
 

Azure

G.O.A.T.
Since this thread gives me a chance to post some works from other industries - some extremely moving films

1. Moondram Pirai (Sadma) - the ending can haunt you for days (Tamil)
2. Pather Panchali - piece of art (Bengali)
3. Sahib Bibi aur Ghulam - beautiful movie, tragic story (Hindi)
4. Anjali (Tamil)
5. Paradesi - depressing enough not to dare you to watch again. (Tamil)
6. Thaniavarthanam (Malayalam)
7. Pyaasa (Hindi)


Will repopulate this list as and when I recall more*
 

onehandbh

G.O.A.T.
All Dogs Go to Heaven

Hiroshima Mon Amour
The Road
Life is Beautiful


Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy
(sad bc I loved the book and hated the movie)
 

mightyrick

Legend
This list isn't complete. But off the top of my head, in no particular order:

Sophie's Choice
Schindler's List
Brokeback Mountain
Traffic
The Pianist
 

Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
Aki Kaurismäki's "The Match Factory Girl" is a very dark, bleak, despairing, depressing, minimalist film that I really enjoyed.

 

r2473

G.O.A.T.
Shoah


Over a decade in the making, Claude Lanzmann’s nine-hour-plus opus is a monumental investigation of the unthinkable: the murder of more than six million Jews by the Nazis. Using no archival footage, Lanzmann instead focuses on first-person testimonies (of survivors and former Nazis, as well as other witnesses), employing a circular, free-associative method in assembling them. The intellectual yet emotionally overwhelming Shoah is not a film about excavating the past but an intensive portrait of the ways in which the past is always present, and it is inarguably one of the most important cinematic works of all time.
 
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