What book are you reading?

Bagumbawalla

Hall of Fame
Well, lately, being more/less locked in/down,
have been reading 2 or 3 books a week...

A Terrible Splendor- Marshall Jon Fisher: about the famous Davis Cup match between von Cramm and Budge.
Lots of information about world events and personalities. Worth reading.

A Handful of Summers- Gordon Forbes: about his life from childhood and as touring player.
Had some amusing anecdotes, but, for some reason, I found him irritating as a person.

Crocodile on the Sandbank- a "mystery" by Elizabeth Peters: was recommended by someone who knew I
read mysteries. It was dull, trivial, and, basically, stupid.

The Anatomy of Human Destructiveness- Erich Fromm: an overview of the psychological, sociological, anthropological and historical factors that help mans aggression and how it differs from other animals. Worth reading.
 

Bagumbawalla

Hall of Fame
Almost forgot-
Currently reading
The World of Jeeves
a collection of stories by P G wodehouse.

One of the best writers ever.
Not necessarily profound, but amusing enough
to compensate for its lack of depth.
 

Vcore89

G.O.A.T.
What do you think of that one? I'm interested in how everyday objects work
An amalgam of mechanical objects, its inner workings elucidated: how they're made, operate and the myriad iterations through the ages presented with stunning photography.
 

Bagumbawalla

Hall of Fame
Just started Death and the Maiden
a mystery novel from the 1940s
by Gladys Mitchell.
The "detective" is Beatrice Bradley a psychoanalyst
and amateur sleuth.
I almost gave up on it after a few pages- the situations
were silly and improbable and the interactions seemed unnatural.
However, I am still reading it. There is just something good natured about
it (so far) that I am hoping for an interesting outcome???

Just finished The World of Jeeves by P G Wodhouse- over 650 pages
of stories about the same characters, but the writing is so excellent
it never get tiring. Possibly the best stylist ever.

Read Dune (Frank Herbert) a while back- liked it- especially the fact that it was not over-explained
and left room for mystery and wonder. So, I bought the next volume in the series, Dune Messiah.
Right off the bat, it started explaining things away. I stopped reading after 50 pages and may
never go back.

After the Jeeves book, I read Alfred Bester's The Stars My Destination.
Written in the mid 1950s, it is still one of the best scifi novels ever- well crafted,
interesting characters, marvelously inventive. Maybe a bit "preachy" toward the end.

And, just before that- read a book called Brilliant Blunderes
by Mario Livio (found it at a thrift store) It looks at varios scientists, Darwin, Lord Kelvin, Linus Pauling,
Fred Hoyle, and Einstein (I may have forgotten a few)- and looks, not so much at their
success, as at their mistakes and blind spots- was an interesting way to learn
about some major ideas in science history.
 

Bagumbawalla

Hall of Fame
Just found (at a thrift store) a copy of Cortina's Spanish Conversational Guide.
The first publication date was 1928, revised in 1942, and it contains a lot
of handy phrases, model conversations in various situations and lists of words and idioms
that might be handy to a traveler of that period. Do people still say, "to care not a fig"? The book says,
"no importarle a uno bledo". I'm sure I will forget that by tomorrow- but I care not a fig!
 

Devtennis01

Hall of Fame
So, what do you think? I barely made it through Swan's Way,
Yet he is considered among the best. What do you think?
I prefer it to the previous one, The Guermantes way. That one was a real slog towards the end. This one has a quicker start with an intriguing story concerning M. de Charlus. I've only got to page 50.
I highly recommend book 2. You could even just read a summary of book 1 and then go to book 2.
 

Bagumbawalla

Hall of Fame
Just finished Death and the Maiden
by Gladys Mitchell

She was once considered one of the "big three"
mystery writers of England, during her time, and this was considered
one of her best novels.

Though it had some interesting observations, and I kept expecting
a clever ending, it was, basically, a waste of time- mostly silly.

Next, I intend to read Arsene Lupin, Gentelman-Burglar
by Maurice Leblanc-
the French answer to Sherlock Holmes. Fingers crossed.
 

Bagumbawalla

Hall of Fame
Also recently read The Demolished Man
by Alfred Bester. A scifi novel about a future where
ESP makes crime/murder nearly impossible.

One of the best in the history of scifi writing.
 

Sudacafan

Talk Tennis Guru
So, what do you think? I barely made it through Swan's Way,
Yet he is considered among the best. What do you think?
I prefer it to the previous one, The Guermantes way. That one was a real slog towards the end. This one has a quicker start with an intriguing story concerning M. de Charlus. I've only got to page 50.
I highly recommend book 2. You could even just read a summary of book 1 and then go to book 2.
It’s worth the task to read the seven volumes.
 

Bagumbawalla

Hall of Fame
While browsing through the books at a thrift store, I found a copy of Hyperspace, by Michio Kaku
who tries to explain that it is easier to comprehend subatomic vibrations and string theory
if we think of them as occuring in ten-dimensional space.

I am about halfway through it and comprehending it less and less, page by page. On hold for the time being.
 

EddieBrock

Professional
Very interesting read. Especially from the perspective of someone who grew up poor in India that had been devastated by effects of socialism. Goes through it's history, comparisons over time, examples of its failure and why people would try to import something with a track record of failure into a successful country.

Haven't finished it yet, but I've learned a lot from it.


 

Bagumbawalla

Hall of Fame
It seems, lately, that I've been picking up random books at thrift stores.
Today I found a copy of The Thousand and One Nights (1909 copyright).
Probably will just read a few stories at a time in between other works.
Also found a copy of In Praise of Idleness and Other Essays, by Bertrand Russell.
It has 15 essays on various social, political and philosophical issues. I may also alternate these essays
between other reading.
Just finished Arsene Lupin Gentelman Burglar, by Maurice Leblanc and, basically, it is just light reading-
sort of like a detective story, but from the vantage point of the criminal- somethng to read before nodding off to sleep.
 

Bagumbawalla

Hall of Fame
Well, I've read about 25 pages or so of each book (see above).
First 1001Nights- What I am finding interesting so far, more than the "stories" themselves,
is the framework of telling stories, within stories, within stories- that and some of the interjected
"words of wisdom" sprinkeled throught the tales. Here is one example (wise) that would apply
to tennis jitters during a close match-

"Tell him who is oppressed with anxiety, that anxiety will not last:
As happiness passeth away, so passeth anxiety".

Of the other book, In Praise of Idleness, Bertrand Russell seems to have a sort of
glib, possibly wry, style as he skips from conclusion to conclusion without
much development- I go from thinking "how stupid" to "how brilliant" to "well
he's just like me" in the space of a couple sentences.

"Leisure is essential to civilization, and in former times leisure for the few
was rendered possible by the labors of the many. But their labors were valuable, not
because work is good, but because leisure is good".
 

Sudacafan

Talk Tennis Guru
Well, I've read about 25 pages or so of each book (see above).
First 1001Nights- What I am finding interesting so far, more than the "stories" themselves,
is the framework of telling stories, within stories, within stories- that and some of the interjected
"words of wisdom" sprinkeled throught the tales. Here is one example (wise) that would apply
to tennis jitters during a close match-

"Tell him who is oppressed with anxiety, that anxiety will not last:
As happiness passeth away, so passeth anxiety".

Of the other book, In Praise of Idleness, Bertrand Russell seems to have a sort of
glib, possibly wry, style as he skips from conclusion to conclusion without
much development- I go from thinking "how stupid" to "how brilliant" to "well
he's just like me" in the space of a couple sentences.

"Leisure is essential to civilization, and in former times leisure for the few
was rendered possible by the labors of the many. But their labors were valuable, not
because work is good, but because leisure is good".
Leisure is good, but I am always wondering if I am making the best use of it.
 
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