What happens around 60?

randzman

Rookie
My nutritionist, age 64, says that I should expect my body to undergo a significant slowing down in my early 60's. (I am 56.)

Is this right?
 

sovertennis

Professional
I'm 62 and have been very fit, active and athletic for my adult life. Although I have noticed some slowing down, it has not been significant, at least not yet. I have made some accommodations, for example I try to play on clay almost exclusively (unfortunately, I coach on almost exclusively hard courts) and seldom play on consecutive days. When I play with younger (eg in their 30s) guys, I'm aware that I cannot move side to side as quickly as I could just a few years ago.

I do a lot of cycling (approx 175 mi/wk) and am able to track my fitness via a power meter. I am able to maintain the same wattage as I could five years ago.

I eat sensibly, do a lot of yoga, and get sufficient sleep, drink only moderately-- all in the hope I can ward off the inevitability of age. I've been blessed with really favorable genetics, so I hope I have a few good years left.
 

Dartagnan64

Legend
People drop out of sports at various ages for various reasons, some of which is controllable (weight, fitness, diet) and some of which is uncontrollable (genetics, prior injuries). Your metabolism will certainly slow with age.

I try not to worry about these things too much. Life's destination is pretty unexciting so you need to enjoy the journey as much as possible.
 

SteveI

Legend
People drop out of sports at various ages for various reasons, some of which is controllable (weight, fitness, diet) and some of which is uncontrollable (genetics, prior injuries). Your metabolism will certainly slow with age.

I try not to worry about these things too much. Life's destination is pretty unexciting so you need to enjoy the journey as much as possible.
well said!!
 

Harry_Wild

G.O.A.T.
The more wear that you put you body through in earlier age, the more your body will aged in later years. Think of a car or a pair of shoes.
 

dgold44

G.O.A.T.
In my 40s and the biggest loses

1) I can’t sprint like I used too and lost a race to my brother that has never happened

2) I need 8 hrs of sleep

3) must eat healthy and not drink
 

Cashman

Professional
The more wear that you put you body through in earlier age, the more your body will aged in later years. Think of a car or a pair of shoes.
It is not really that simple. The right amount of physical activity, done with correct technique, can actually have a protective effect - e.g. running is actually good for your knees as it strengthens your bones and helps the joints stay lubricated.

'Wearing your body out' has a lot more to do with overtraining and injuries than it does with the base level of activity you put you put your body through.
 

dgold44

G.O.A.T.
It is not really that simple. The right amount of physical activity, done with correct technique, can actually have a protective effect - e.g. running is actually good for your knees as it strengthens your bones and helps the joints stay lubricated.

'Wearing your body out' has a lot more to do with overtraining and injuries than it does with the base level of activity you put you put your body through.
I am putting heavy wear on my body in my 40s and far more than anytime in my life .
I will cut things back next summer to match my age
 

Harry_Wild

G.O.A.T.
Should I just sit on the couch?

Or maybe better yet, lay on the couch? Don’t want to wear myself out.
Not saying you should not exercise or get in shape. That good for your overall health. I talking about overdoing the exercise stuff like running marathons every two weeks, stuff like that!
 

movdqa

Talk Tennis Guru
The slowdown is in your late 40s and through your 50s. But you can fight it. I'm 60, recovering from cancer treatment and I can say that I'm stronger than I have ever been. I have been in better cardiovascular shape but that's because I can't do a lot of strength-training and cardio until I retire. Stuff deteriorates when you get older unless you work it so that it doesn't deteriorate. If you work hard enough, you can get better at it.

#1 thing: if you are overweight - lose it. It gets harder and harder to lose weight as you get older because some of the things that you do to lose weight can cause injury because of the excess weight. If you lose the weight, a lot of good things happen to your body but - you just feel better. It then makes it easier to improve cardiovascular fitness, balance, flexibility and strength.

If you get all of that done and have more time, do something for your brain. I play chess and do chess puzzles and am studying some mathematics. I have a lot of things that I'd like to study to keep my brain active. Sports also helps with keeping the brain active.
 

HouTex

Rookie
Read Younger Next Year by Chris Crowley and Henry Lodge, MD.
Basically, it's 45 minutes of cardio 5-6 days a week and a few days of weight training. And cutting out or way down on worthless carbs like fries and white rice and basically just eating healthy.

But there has to be a balance. If you cut out every indulgence of tasty food and good booze, at some point, life just isn't worth living.
 

SteveI

Legend
Suppose to keep you young!
USTA claims so.. it depends on how you have played over the years. They are full of it. Real high level players 4.0 plus and over with modern stokes tear their bodies apart. Most players I know that play at a high level have injuries that are related to tennis. Hips.. knees.. ankles.. feet.. shoulders.. wrist.. etc. If you walk around the court with a 110 or larger racketing playing slice and dice tennis.. you can "play" forever.
 

movdqa

Talk Tennis Guru
USTA claims so.. it depends on how you have played over the years. They are full of it. Real high level players 4.0 plus and over with modern stokes tear their bodies apart. Most players I know that play at a high level have injuries that are related to tennis. Hips.. knees.. ankles.. feet.. shoulders.. wrist.. etc. If you walk around the court with a 110 or larger racketing playing slice and dice tennis.. you can "play" forever.
Rod Laver hitting with Roger Federer at the AO is a good example of that.
 

SteveI

Legend
Read Younger Next Year by Chris Crowley and Henry Lodge, MD.
Basically, it's 45 minutes of cardio 5-6 days a week and a few days of weight training. And cutting out or way down on worthless carbs like fries and white rice and basically just eating healthy.

But there has to be a balance. If you cut out every indulgence of tasty food and good booze, at some point, life just isn't worth living.

I have read this book many times... they state in the book that tennis is not good for your body... not a healing sport like walking swimming.. etc. Court sports tear you apart limb from limb. Great read. I eat on the 80 20 plan. 80 perfect of the time I eat clean.. the other 20... I do the indulgence thing. Man can not live by veggies alone.. :)..
 

movdqa

Talk Tennis Guru
Read Younger Next Year by Chris Crowley and Henry Lodge, MD.
Basically, it's 45 minutes of cardio 5-6 days a week and a few days of weight training. And cutting out or way down on worthless carbs like fries and white rice and basically just eating healthy.

But there has to be a balance. If you cut out every indulgence of tasty food and good booze, at some point, life just isn't worth living.
What do they consider cardio? Running five miles? Walking five miles?
 

HouTex

Rookie
What do they consider cardio? Running five miles? Walking five miles?
The authors suggest low impact cardio. They are big on spinning. Walking does not get the heart rate high enough. For some, jogging would be OK, but it can be hard on the knees and other body parts. The premise of the book is that you need to continue the cardio and weight training basically until you die or your body falls apart. By doing so you give yourself the best chance to stay healthy and active into your 80's. And they say it's never too late to start.
 

movdqa

Talk Tennis Guru
The authors suggest low impact cardio. They are big on spinning. Walking does not get the heart rate high enough. For some, jogging would be OK, but it can be hard on the knees and other body parts. The premise of the book is that you need to continue the cardio and weight training basically until you die or your body falls apart. By doing so you give yourself the best chance to stay healthy and active into your 80's. And they say it's never too late to start.
That's what my cardio said. I was getting in 200K steps a week but he said increase intensity. I was on chemo at the time though and I had medical equipment attached to my body so there were a lot of limits on what I could do. I've been spending about an hour on Yoga and weights most days lately. I'd like to run more but work gets in the way. Running is fantastic at getting your heartrate up. But I think that doing heavy weights and balance and flexibility work are also required.
 

SteveI

Legend
The authors suggest low impact cardio. They are big on spinning. Walking does not get the heart rate high enough. For some, jogging would be OK, but it can be hard on the knees and other body parts. The premise of the book is that you need to continue the cardio and weight training basically until you die or your body falls apart. By doing so you give yourself the best chance to stay healthy and active into your 80's. And they say it's never too late to start.
HIIT is the key if you have limited time and beat up knees. You can do the HIIT on a bike!! :)
 

esgee48

Legend
As a general statement, it is not true. It is what you put your body thru in life that determines what may or may not happen when you turn 60. You could have the joints and body of a 60 YO when you are 40 if you've abused your body. If you do recreational drugs, that cannot be good for your health.

I still do sprints, not long distance running, on a track. Eat and drink moderately. Keep weight under control. Walk up/down hills in San Francisco is one form of exercise I like to do.
 

GBplayer

Hall of Fame
The authors suggest low impact cardio. They are big on spinning. Walking does not get the heart rate high enough. For some, jogging would be OK, but it can be hard on the knees and other body parts. The premise of the book is that you need to continue the cardio and weight training basically until you die or your body falls apart. By doing so you give yourself the best chance to stay healthy and active into your 80's. And they say it's never too late to start.
Looking in the mirror gets the heart rate up for some, part of the Mediterranean diet :love:
 

SteveI

Legend
What do they consider cardio? Running five miles? Walking five miles?
Read this book a few times. Great read. Real cardio that breaks a sweat. They explain in the book. Based on heart rate.. etc. They also tell you get a heart rate monitor if you are really serious about accurate results. I use... "the can't get a shirt over my head because it is so wet it is stuck to my body method". :)
 

SteveI

Legend
Same here. I like running (but let's be honest, it's really jogging) for cardio but my knees hurt if I do too often. I do it on a dirt/caleche track, not hard concrete and it still hurts.
When I do run.. I try not to use my full gait. Try to run.. jog in the woods on soft surfaces. Now I do HIIT on my outside or inside bike. That does the trick..
 

movdqa

Talk Tennis Guru
When I do run.. I try not to use my full gait. Try to run.. jog in the woods on soft surfaces. Now I do HIIT on my outside or inside bike. That does the trick..
I bought a Garmin Felix 5+ a year ago after a trip to the emergency room for a heart issue. I would have died without some drug they gave me to restart my heart rhythm. It was a real pain checking my heart rate manually ten times a day.

The HRM is fantastic but it also gives me a lot of other data like sleep, stress, steps, stairs and I can track weight. It will also do running dynamics and coaching. And it’s a music player, has maps of North America for hiking or driving and it can do payments if I go running without my wallet and phone.

My tennis club just resurfaced their indoor tennis courts and track and I’m going to give it a try. I have access to another indoor track at another associated club. I usually just run on pavement outside home or office. There are woods that I can run through as well but the idea of driving seven miles to run three or four is distasteful.

When on the treadmill, I leave my phone with the bio data screen on so I can see if I’m in trouble. I should set the HR alarms too. The reports are nice as they show resting and maximum heart rate by day, week, month or year. It’s orett easy to see whether or not you’re hitting your goals.
 

movdqa

Talk Tennis Guru
When I do run.. I try not to use my full gait. Try to run.. jog in the woods on soft surfaces. Now I do HIIT on my outside or inside bike. That does the trick..
I find that good shoes do make a considerable difference. I used to buy cheap shoes and use an aftermarket insole which often cost more than the shoes. Now I buy good quality shoes that are previous years models. I track the miles I put on shoes and replace after 300 to 400.
 
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