What is a ratchet for???

ricardo

Hall of Fame
I am currently using a Gamma X-2 (the cheapest Gamma stringing machine).
It has what they call a 'ratchet'.

For poly, I never use the ratchet at all because the string does not stretch that much.

However, for other strings, I use the ratchet.

I strung an Ashaway Monogut ZX ( a very stretchy string) once and I use the ratchet about 10 times.
The bar always go down past horizontal so I have to ratchet 10 times.

Using the ratchet is very simple.
Hold the gripper/ratchet and lift the bar past horizontal.

Question:

Why is the Klippermate not using a ratchet?
If you are using a very stretchy string like Ashaway monogut ZX, how do you tension it using Klippermate, which does not have a ratchet?

I am just curious.
 

beernutz

Hall of Fame
I am currently using a Gamma X-2 (the cheapest Gamma stringing machine).
It has what they call a 'ratchet'.

For poly, I never use the ratchet at all because the string does not stretch that much.

However, for other strings, I use the ratchet.

I strung an Ashaway Monogut ZX ( a very stretchy string) once and I use the ratchet about 10 times.
The bar always go down past horizontal so I have to ratchet 10 times.

Using the ratchet is very simple.
Hold the gripper/ratchet and lift the bar past horizontal.

Question:

Why is the Klippermate not using a ratchet?
If you are using a very stretchy string like Ashaway monogut ZX, how do you tension it using Klippermate, which does not have a ratchet?

I am just curious.

On a Klippermate you simply change the position of the string in the gripper if the bar is not horizontal or very close to it and then drop the bar again. It doesn't take long to do this and once you have pulled a few of the same type string you get an idea of where to grip the string so that the bar ends up horizontal.

I did over a hundred string jobs with my Klippermate during the 5 years I owned it and the lack of a ratchet did not bother me at all.

As far as why Klippermate does not include a ratchet on their stringer you'd have to ask them for a definitive answer but my guess would be that they don't think it is an essential component of their drop weight mechanism.
 

ricardo

Hall of Fame
On a Klippermate you simply change the position of the string in the gripper if the bar is not horizontal or very close to it and then drop the bar again. It doesn't take long to do this and once you have pulled a few of the same type string you get an idea of where to grip the string so that the bar ends up horizontal.

I did over a hundred string jobs with my Klippermate during the 5 years I owned it and the lack of a ratchet did not bother me at all.

As far as why Klippermate does not include a ratchet on their stringer you'd have to ask them for a definitive answer but my guess would be that they don't think it is an essential component of their drop weight mechanism.

On a Klippermate you simply change the position of the string in the gripper if the bar is not horizontal or very close to it and then drop the bar again.

I fully agree with this statement if you are stringing poly or other strings that don't stretch that much. I do this too, BTW.

However, there are strings that stretch a lot (i.e Ashaway monogut ZX stretched by 3.5 ft our of 20ft).

I tried manually to pull the string to the correct gripper position but I guess I am not strong enough to do it. I rely on the ratchet to pull the string to the correct reference tension.

I think with Klippermate, you only have one bar drop per try. If the bar drops below horizontal (under tension), you have to ungrip and then manually pull the string, grip it again and try again. With a very stretchy string, you have to do this several times until the bar becomes horizontal or until you can no longer pull manually because the more you manually pull the harder it is to pull the string manually.

I am still confused on how Klippermate users string a very stretchy string like Ashaway Monogut ZX that can stretch up to 4 ft (20 ft long).
 

seekay

Semi-Pro
I think with Klippermate, you only have one bar drop per try. If the bar drops below horizontal (under tension), you have to ungrip and then manually pull the string, grip it again and try again. With a very stretchy string, you have to do this several times until the bar becomes horizontal or until you can no longer pull manually because the more you manually pull the harder it is to pull the string manually.

I am still confused on how Klippermate users string a very stretchy string like Ashaway Monogut ZX that can stretch up to 4 ft (20 ft long).

You're not missing anything. If the string stretches enough, a Klippermate user will have to lift up the bar, reposition the string, and ease the bar down again. I never got good at it, but others develop the muscle memory to perform that action nearly as quickly as a ratchet user can.
 

ricardo

Hall of Fame
You're not missing anything. If the string stretches enough, a Klippermate user will have to lift up the bar, reposition the string, and ease the bar down again. I never got good at it, but others develop the muscle memory to perform that action nearly as quickly as a ratchet user can.

I am still confused.

I have a problem conceptualizing this.

I don't think it is about muscle memory but about muscle strenght.

reposition the string

Everytime you have to reposition the string, you have to ungrip the string from the gripper. Correct?

Repositioning the string by 1 to maybe 3 inches is no problem. I think I am strong enough to manually stretch a string by up to 3 inches. However, I am not strong enough to stretch a string up to 3 feet when repositioning it.

When I string poly, I don't usually use the ratchet. I just manually reposition the poly string because it only takes about 1/4 to 1/2 inches repositioning.

However, when stringing stretchy strings, I have to reposition not by inches but by feet and I am not strong enough to do this without a ratchet.
 

seekay

Semi-Pro
Keep in mind that you're only tensioning about two feet at a time (not 40), so the string's elongation will be measured in inches, not feet. If you're wrapping feet of string around your X-2's gripper, odds are that something is off somewhere else.

There's no need to pull it tight by hand; the gripper should be able to pull the few inches that the string will stretch. I've strung Zyex, and I don't think even it stretches enough that the gripper can't be set correctly.

That said, if you find a string that stretches more than the gripper can take, then you lift the bar up and the section of string you've tensioned is now pre-stretched. It won't stretch as far next time, so it's just a matter of repositioning the gripper correctly on the loose string and letting the machine pull.
 

ricardo

Hall of Fame
Keep in mind that you're only tensioning about two feet at a time (not 40), so the string's elongation will be measured in inches, not feet. If you're wrapping feet of string around your X-2's gripper, odds are that something is off somewhere else.

There's no need to pull it tight by hand; the gripper should be able to pull the few inches that the string will stretch. I've strung Zyex, and I don't think even it stretches enough that the gripper can't be set correctly.

That said, if you find a string that stretches more than the gripper can take, then you lift the bar up and the section of string you've tensioned is now pre-stretched. It won't stretch as far next time, so it's just a matter of repositioning the gripper correctly on the loose string and letting the machine pull.

Thanks seekay.

I think that is all I need to know.

I was just curious...
 
Or you can use a starting clamp to hold the tensioned string against the outside frame before lifting the tension arm. Then re-position the string in the gripper.

Been doing that for extreme stretchy strings. Strung over a thousand rackets in the last 30 months with a Klippermate... I'm mad :twisted:
 

ricardo

Hall of Fame
Or you can use a starting clamp to hold the tensioned string against the outside frame before lifting the tension arm. Then re-position the string in the gripper.

Been doing that for extreme stretchy strings. Strung over a thousand rackets in the last 30 months with a Klippermate... I'm mad :twisted:

Yes.....

Now I got it.

For some extremely stretchy strings, you built a home-made ratcher (starting clamp).

Good man....
 

beernutz

Hall of Fame
I could not agree more.

A ratcheting mechanism makes stringing much more convenient and efficient.

Your X-2 not having fixed clamps does not make it a bad stringing machine.

The Klippermate not having a ratcheting mechanism does not make it a bad stringing machine.

I have used both and the Klippermate clamps are much better than those with the X-2, but that doesn't make the X-2 a bad stringer either.

This topic has been done to death on the forum. Perhaps rather than regurgitating it for the umpteenth time a forum search would be preferable?
 
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