What is exactly the effect of lead at 7" from the buttcap?

Pitti

Rookie
Hi. I'm experimenting and learning how to customize my racquets.

I've been playing for a while with an Ultra Tour. Following suggestions of members from this forum, I put a very little bit of lead at 10 and 2 and counterbalanced it with the same amount at 7" from the buttcap. I've enjoyed this setup to the point I've played with it for almost a full year. Still, I lack a little bit of power and plowthrough. So I have some questions that I want to ask you so that I learn a bit more:

- What would happen if I maintain the lead I have at 10 and 2, but increase the amount I have at 7" from the buttcap?
- What would happen if I increase the amount of lead I have in both places?
- What would happen if I take the lead at 10 and 2 and put it at 12 while maintaining lead at 7"?

- And the most important question: what's the exact effect of adding lead at around 7" from the buttcap? Why add it there instead of the trapdoor? Why does it "work"? (as I said, I liked it).

Thank you.
 
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dave t

Rookie
Best not to ask questions round these parts. It does work. And that's all that matters! To answer your question about the three setups:

1. whippier, faster feel. Not much change in plowthrough, though any time you add weight, you can expect it to feel a little more solid/a little more power. Will not change swing weight or balance too much.
2. More power/plow but your weight, balance and swing weight are all going to change. Not sure this is desirable.
3. Probably where I would start. Might increase swing weight/balance a touch, but not too much (hard to use definite amounts as I don't know the amounts of lead). Lead at 12 gives the most power/plow out of any set up.

Other than that, the ultra tour isn't really know for its power or plow through and generally needs a decent amount of lead to bring these out. If you really want these things, try a blade.
 

Pitti

Rookie
Thank you.

When I said "very little bit of lead" I was just referring to a gram in total at the head and another gram in total at 7" from the buttcap. I started there because it was the first time I leaded up a racket and I was afraid of using too much weight. I also use an overgrip. Since the lead seemed to raise a little bit the sweetspot while keeping everything comfortable, I left it like that. But I'm now thinking of increasing weight a little bit more, and I'm curious about the 7" lead location and want to learn more about that.

I may raise lead to a gram at 10 and a gram at 2 with 2 grams at 7". Or just put the gram of the head at 12. I haven't still decided what to do...
 

Pitti

Rookie
Also, and hypothetically: would taking a light racquet (one of those 'lite' racquets) and adding a substantial amount of weight at around 7" make that racquet stable? Why/why not? Thank you.
 

blablavla

Legend
Also, and hypothetically: would taking a light racquet (one of those 'lite' racquets) and adding a substantial amount of weight at around 7" make that racquet stable? Why/why not? Thank you.
probably not.
if you will add a lot of weight at 7" from the buttcap it will make the frame super HL, but not necessarily stable.
I think the common sense on stability is weight added in the hoop at 3/9 and then counterbalanced by weight added in the grip
 

Slowtwitcher

Hall of Fame
I recently customized my racquet to increase SW and maintain balance point and the customization tools from TW University were really helpful.
 

3loudboys

Hall of Fame
probably not.
if you will add a lot of weight at 7" from the buttcap it will make the frame super HL, but not necessarily stable.
I think the common sense on stability is weight added in the hoop at 3/9 and then counterbalanced by weight added in the grip
That's my goto mod with a racket around 295-300.

Sent from my SM-A705FN using Tapatalk
 

fuzz nation

G.O.A.T.
I guess you're referring to lead at 3&9 + grip, right?
That's where I place my lead tape on the hoop when I want to get more stability at contact from one of my frames. It may require only a couple of grams total depending on the racquet, but it might take a little extra.

Once I get the stability feeling right for me, I might need to add weight to the handle (counterbalance). What works for me: step one is to wrap one or two layers of 1/2" lead tape at the flare of the butt cap, but far enough from the bottom edge of the grip so that I can cover it with my overgrip.

If I need more, step two is to run maybe 5"-7" of that lead tape on the handle bevels that are parallel with the edge of the frame, not the ones that are parallel with the string bed. One layer of that tape on those bevels doesn't alter the feel of the grip for me.

Weighting the handle effectively moves the frame's balance point closer to the handle. A middleweight racquet might feel a little sluggish if it doesn't have much head-light balance, but a heavier frame can be more manageable and maneuverable when it has more head-light balance. My 12.5 oz. Volkl C10's have lead added only to their handles. They're stable enough through the ball without needing extra heft added to the hoop, but they swing around more comfortably for me with their balance up around 10-11 pts. head-light.

More head-light balance isn't universally better. A lighter frame can actually get too twitchy and unpredictable if it's too head light. I found this out when I had one or two experiments with leading up lighter racquets go bad on me.
 

3loudboys

Hall of Fame
I guess you're referring to lead at 3&9 + grip, right?
Right, lead in the hoop at 3&9 for stability and plough, counterbalanced in the handle with tac. I recently used silicon in the handle in a pair of PK 7G's and worked a treat.
 

2nd Serve Ace

Hall of Fame
These SW machines that swivel the handle midpoint aren't real world, since any actual player is swinging the whole frame.

Maybe move some of that handle weight to the end.
 

tennisbike

Professional
Experiment yourself is the best way. My suggestions: Start with materials that is available and easy to put on and off. My personal choice: mounting putty, and coins (each nickel about 10 grams, penny a bit less than 10 grams)

Many of my sticks have 2 coins above the hand position. I had as many as 8.. which one was that? I forget. In general, made the racket quicker to come around. Generally easier to play.
 

Shroud

G.O.A.T.
Also, and hypothetically: would taking a light racquet (one of those 'lite' racquets) and adding a substantial amount of weight at around 7" make that racquet stable? Why/why not? Thank you.
I put alot of weight at 7". Like 20-30g sometimes. I use it not for stability but when I have added weight in the hoop (always 10 &2) to make the swing faster. The stability comes from the weight in the hoop.

So I do start with a lite racquet like 250-260g and add about 60 g to the racquet.

Also the best way to mess with the 7" spot IMHO is to get some poster putty and just add it around the racquet. You can use a wall or ball machine and just add little bits until you start feeling the racquet swing to early. Then remove what is on the racquet and weigh. Then put that much lead there.
 
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