What kind of knot do you use when stretching a string?

I tie one end to a doorknob.
Other end to a racket throat.
I always wonder if there is a correct knot for this application.

Then I just tie some shoelace sorta knot and not give a crap and forget about it.
 

MAX PLY

Hall of Fame
No knot at all (for those very few times I pre-stretch). I wrap it around a pole or a door knob and pull both ends. See 1:19 of the Ron Yu video you posted and you can see how to do it (you cannot see what he is wrapping the string around but there is no knot on the other end).
 

jim e

Legend
No knot used. I clamp string end to fixed clamp of machine, lock turn table walk string back to end (allows me to check string for defects) ,and pull. Heavy machine allows this.Then again I typically pre stretch only Nat gut and only a light one at that to rid of some of the coil memory.
 
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10shoe

Semi-Pro
Haven't manually prestretched in ages but when I did I used a floating clamp on one end to create a loop which I draped over the doodad at the top of a 4 ft high chain link fence post. The other end I think I just used a long nosed plier. The OP's use of a racquet in the process is interesting/inventive. I think I would use the strung end though. Just run the string through the center of the string bed, secure with a good starting clamp and grab both sides of the head like a steering wheel and lean back....with a good mattress behind you of course.
 
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No knot at all (for those very few times I pre-stretch). I wrap it around a pole or a door knob and pull both ends. See 1:19 of the Ron Yu video you posted and you can see how to do it (you cannot see what he is wrapping the string around but there is no knot on the other end).
This is ineffective, since your force is divided by two.
 
No knot used. I clamp string end to fixed clamp of machine, lock turn table walk string back to end (allows me to check string for defects) ,and pull. Heavy machine allows this.Then again I typically pre stretch only Nat gut and only a light one at that to rid of some of the coil memory.
This is ineffective.
You're barely generating any force by just pulling on a string with your fingers.
This would not work at all with ZX.
You need massive force, not a light pull.
 

struggle

Legend
Simple answer. Quit playing with ZX, it's a silly string. The method works supremely for NG.

I don't bother hand pre-stretching any other string.

Again, let your fancy ass machine handle it.
 

jim e

Legend
This is ineffective.
You're barely generating any force by just pulling on a string with your fingers.
This would not work at all with ZX.
You need massive force, not a light pull.
You evidently did not read my post properly. I said I do a light pre stretch to get rid of some of the coil memory of nat. Gut period. I do not want to change the characteristics of the string. That is my pre stretch.
Your OP did not specify the type of pre stretch you wanted. This pre stretch is not inadequate for my purpose. You should make your question more specific and you may get a response you would want, rather than tell me what I do is ineffective.
I guess I should have expected a response from you as such.
 

MAX PLY

Hall of Fame
^^^upon further reflection, I think the OP’s current method (as described in his first post) is perfectly suited to his stringing acumen. Likewise, this thread actually answers a question posted by another recent stringing thread.
 
I tie one end to a doorknob.
Other end to a racket throat.
I always wonder if there is a correct knot for this application.

Then I just tie some shoelace sorta knot and not give a crap and forget about it.
You want a knot that:

A. Has no chance of slipping when you pull up to 100 lbs of tension.

B. Has low risk of breakage at the knot.

C. Has low risk of breakage where it is pulled against the anchor.

D. Doesn’t waste too much string.

I use a loop of 3/16” braided nylon rope.

When I am home, I use a loop of the rope and slip it over the end of my bar countertop as an anchor. Then tie the string to the rope with a triple hitch.

If I was using a doorknob, I’d use two loops of rope. Use the second loop to tightly secure the first loop to the door knob. Then tie the string to the first loop using a triple hitch.

Using the rope ensures that the string doesn’t have to go around any solid objects. And saves wasting string.
 
^^^upon further reflection, I think the OP’s current method (as described in his first post) is perfectly suited to his stringing acumen. Likewise, this thread actually answers a question posted by another recent stringing thread.
LMAO, the guy using the pole method, who does not even get why it's only 50% effective, is mocking me? Classic
 
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You want a knot that:

A. Has no chance of slipping when you pull up to 100 lbs of tension.

B. Has low risk of breakage at the knot.

C. Has low risk of breakage where it is pulled against the anchor.

D. Doesn’t waste too much string.

I use a loop of 3/16” braided nylon rope.

When I am home, I use a loop of the rope and slip it over the end of my bar countertop as an anchor. Then tie the string to the rope with a triple hitch.

If I was using a doorknob, I’d use two loops of rope. Use the second loop to tightly secure the first loop to the door knob. Then tie the string to the first loop using a triple hitch.

Using the rope ensures that the string doesn’t have to go around any solid objects. And saves wasting string.
Excellent.
Someone who gets it.

I like the idea of your triply hitch to an external rope (or other scrap string)
I can't visualize what you mean by hanging the rope over the bar. Not sure what is securing it.
Nor can I visualize how you attach the string to the rope. There are few triple hitch videos online, and they only use one string
 
By triple hitch I just mean do an over-under-through 3 times. A double hitch is probably ok for zx, but won’t hold with some strings like slippery coated nylon. A triple hitch should be always safe.

By bar countertop, I just mean that my kitchen has a countertop behind sink that sticks out at one end. I have a loop of rope big enough to loop over the end of the countertop. I reuse the rope loop, but cut off the string off of it. So my rope loop has many dozens of tennis string knots left behind on it.
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
Drill a hole in a board and stick the string through it and place a starting clamp on both ends on the string. Pull one and let the board hold the other. If you end up dragging the board you’re dumber than we think, and that’s really dumb.

If you want to see what happens when you tie gut in a knot, the next time you pre-stretch gut tie a knot in the center of the string. If it breaks tell your supplier you want you money back
 
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Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
When stringing gut IMO you should do all you can to prevent and kinks in the gut. A knot is probably one of the worst kind of kinks you could possibly get in the string. Doing it on purpose is just flat out ignorant. There’s only one thing I can’t think of that is worse than tying a knot in gut string and that’s tying 2 knots both in the same place. If you tie a knot in gut to pre-stretch it, I would assume you would tie it near the end. How do you insure when you tie the gut off you don’t create a knot in the same place twice?
 
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