What makes a ProKennex "arm-friendly"

sstchur

Hall of Fame
I always hear that ProKennex racquets are very arm friendly. What makes them so? As far as I can tell, the ones that have a reputation for being very arm-friendly, tend to be heavier. I think this makes sense, as I've heard that heavier racquets are, generally speaking, more arm friendly than lighter ones.

So could I not make my current racquet more "arm-friendly" by adding gobs of lead?

How much difference does balance make in terms of arm friendliness? The Redondo for instance, is 12.1oz strung and about 10pts head light.

My current racquet (wth some lead in the handle) is also about 10pts head-light, so could I not just add weight to the throat to get a similar weight and end up with some a lot like the Redondo?

Other than head size (mine is 100sq in) and weight, my racquet is not all the different from the Redondo.

Or is there something else that PK does to make racquets "arm friendly"
 

fuzz nation

G.O.A.T.
Aside from the Kinetic technology in that line of PK racquets, the Redondos are among the more flexible frames around and they also have a little heft to them. That makes them more stable and less likely to send as much jarring shock into the wrist and arm of the player using it.
 

Keifers

Legend
The Kinetic Technology makes them arm friendly. Go to www.prokennex.com to learn more.

Aside from the Kinetic technology in that line of PK racquets, the Redondos are among the more flexible frames around and they also have a little heft to them. That makes them more stable and less likely to send as much jarring shock into the wrist and arm of the player using it.
I agree. PK's Kinetic technology really does work ("Ionic" is the latest refinement).

Also, in terms of learning more about choices and tradeoffs, etc., you should check out racquetresearch dot com -- there's a lot of good information there about the principles and practices of racquet design, especially for arm and shoulder safety.
 
How does the PK 5G compare to PK Copper Ace in terms of arm-friendliness?

probably similar if the flexibility is similar. It's all in the flex (and weight).
Any racket over 11.5 oz and flexible RA of 62 or less should be arm friendly.
I'm just guessing at the RA but are those Pro Kennex rackets in the 60 to 62 range?
 
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Mr. Blond

Professional
I agree with the above poster. The only caveat to stiffness rating is the techniques on how the rating is attained. For example, some racquet companies measure stiffness with grips on, whereas others do not. That sort of variance does sort of skew stiffness ratings by a little.

Just about anything with a stiffness of 63 or lower and head light balance will be arm friendly. Most of PK racquets are at least 6 pts head light and the stiffness well below 63.

Just to reinforce the previous statements....the kinetic material really does work. The ionic line was poo, but the kinetic is very arm friendly.
 

pshulam

Hall of Fame
probably similar if the flexibility is similar. It's all in the flex (and weight).
Any racket over 11.5 oz and flexible RA of 62 or less should be arm friendly.
I'm just guessing at the RA but are those Pro Kennex rackets in the 60 to 62 range?

In terms of flex rating, Copper Ace is much lower (in the 50s). The specs for a Copper Ace are:
40% graphite, 60% fiberglass
head size = 86 sq in
weight = 12.4 oz
beam width = 16 mm
9 points head light
flex = ~53

Does that mean the Copper Ace is more arm friendly? How about playability? I think that they are quite different.
 
I used to use the kinetic 5g. It's the technology that makes it arm friendly. It must absorb a great deal of shock, resulting in less absorption by the elbow.
If you buy one though, you need to be very careful with them. They're very fragile racquest. I broke about three just by hitting. Don't pick up balls off the court by "bouncing" them with your racquet and generally look after them.
Great racquets though.
 

pshulam

Hall of Fame
I used to use the kinetic 5g. It's the technology that makes it arm friendly. It must absorb a great deal of shock, resulting in less absorption by the elbow.
If you buy one though, you need to be very careful with them. They're very fragile racquest. I broke about three just by hitting. Don't pick up balls off the court by "bouncing" them with your racquet and generally look after them.
Great racquets though.
Thanks for the tips of taking care of the 5G.
Which racket(s) do you use now?
 
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