WHAT PISSES YOU OFF ABOUT YOUR DOUBLES PARTNERS?

Today in a pick-up rec match, my "partner" decides for us, with no consultation, that he will serve first, out of the sun of course--and, using MY new can of balls, not even making the pretense of offering to open a can of his own. He commences to not get one first serve in, all going into the net. Needless to say, HE loses his serve.--doesn't he know you should have your team's best server serve first!?
 
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sureshs

Bionic Poster
Today in a pick-up rec match, my "partner" decides for us, with no consultation, that he will serve first, out of the sun of course--and, using MY new can of balls, not even making the pretense of offering to open a can of his. own He commences to not get one first serve in , all going into the net. Needless to say, HE loses his serve.--doesn't he know you should have your team's best server serve first!?
I have been guilty of that. I try to serve first whenever possible, even I am not warmed up and the partner has already played. The reasoning is very simple:

First to serve ends up getting more games to serve in - hence more experence
First to serve has the cold start problem and nervousness - which can be overcome only by serving first a lot
Doubles and doubles partners suck - so it is better to look out for your skills improvement that the good of the team
 

kevrol

Hall of Fame
Today in a pick-up rec match, my "partner" decides for us, with no consultation, that he will serve first, out of the sun of course--and, using MY new can of balls, not even making the pretense of offering to open a can of his. own He commences to not get one first serve in , all going into the net. Needless to say, HE loses his serve.--doesn't he know you should have your team's best server serve first!?
Guess you know what he thinks of your serves now.
 

sureshs

Bionic Poster
Another tip: never feel bad or apologize if you are the weak link on your side. It is your partner's problem. If he was really any good, he would have found better players to partner with.

There are players who get irritated with their partner's level of play and think that by constant talking, they can somehow increase the level of their partner's game. Screw them.
 
I'm returning serve, it's a close one, it hit may have been just long--but, in the spirit of sportsmanship as codified in "THE CODE", I give our opponents the "benefit of the doubt" and played it. My late "partner", after the point ends, asks "Why did I play that long serve?"--I tell him that he has the best view of the service line since he is standing right on it--and that he needs to help me out with that call. He did hook them on the first point of the match, calling a close ball out, that had our opponents giving themselves "the look"--I made up for my "partner's bad eyesight/cheating wys by hitting my next ROS long, into the back fence for an obvious make-up point.
 
Now don't get me wrong and I admire your effort, but 6.0 mph serves don't cut it.
No Sueresh, you got that wrong, it's a USTA 6.0 level serve, (certified so by a long time teaching pro who helped develop the rating system)--the speed of it about 120 MPH--sorry, I wasn't going to brag but you forced my hand.
 

sureshs

Bionic Poster
No Sueresh, you got that wrong, it's a USTA 6.0 level serve, (certified so by a long time teaching pro who helped develop the rating system)--the speed of it about 120 MPH--sorry, I wasn't going to brag but you forced my hand.
I think you misunderstood him. He had measured the sum of the speeds of the first and second serve.
 

Dartagnan64

Legend
Doubles partners that won't position themselves properly is my pet peeve. There's numerous types:

1) Hang back Harry - still thinks doubles is a singles game and he can just hit topspin FH's from 3 feet behind the baseline and dictate play
2) Towering over the net Thomas - Never more than a foot from the net, crushes balls often before they cross the net to his side, spends most of the second set yelling "yours" when lob after lob goes over his head.
3) Midcourt Mary - 3.0 ladies doubles player that is used to taking moonballs out of the air from no man's land to the service line and just hangs out there in mixed getting bludgeoned by dipping topspin at her feet
4) Alley Camper Adrian - stands and the junction of the service line and doubles alley and NEVER moves. Complains of a weak net game while failing repeatedly to salvage ankle high volleys.
5) Poaching Peter - doesn't matter the likelihood of a successful poach or how good (or bad) his partners serve is, he always attacks the middle. Gets passed repeatedly down the line, muttering "lucky shot" after every one. Nets one in two diving backhand volleys. Every 4th try, hammers a winner with a fist pump and "c'mon!!"
 

ShaunS

Semi-Pro
No Sueresh, you got that wrong, it's a USTA 6.0 level serve, (certified so by a long time teaching pro who helped develop the rating system)--the speed of it about 120 MPH--sorry, I wasn't going to brag but you forced my hand.
Post a video of you hitting a 120mph serve in and I'll buy you a pizza and a tennis outfit from Marshalls.

I wasn't going to do it, but I really don't believe you. :whistle:


doesn't he know you should have your team's best server serve first!?
I've got a very strong serve for my level, so I almost always serve first in a competitive match. The exception would be if I had a partner who served well but really preferred one side due to something with the conditions (sun, wind). I'd rather have them at their peak. If it's just some pickup match though, I doubt I'll care enough about it to stress over serving order.

On a more general level, double faults from your partner are one of the toughest things to deal with. The only thing that frustrates me more is playing with someone who tries to cheat on line calls. I'm not going to be a party to that.
 
Post a video of you hitting a 120mph serve in and I'll buy you a pizza and a tennis outfit from Marshalls.

I wasn't going to do it, but I really don't believe you. :whistle:
Thanks for being a fan. It'll take a lot more then that for me to hire a film crew to satisfy your fandom--how 'bout a Bugatti Veyron to match my serve--a previously owned one will do.
 

bertrevert

Hall of Fame
Thanks for being a fan. It'll take a lot more then that for me to hire a film crew to satisfy your fandom--how 'bout a Bugatti Veyron to match my serve--a previously owned one will do.
Eh, get your friend to hold your mobile up behind you and voila
 
D

Deleted member 23235

Guest
Doubles partners that won't position themselves properly is my pet peeve. There's numerous types:

1) Hang back Harry - still thinks doubles is a singles game and he can just hit topspin FH's from 3 feet behind the baseline and dictate play
2) Towering over the net Thomas - Never more than a foot from the net, crushes balls often before they cross the net to his side, spends most of the second set yelling "yours" when lob after lob goes over his head.
3) Midcourt Mary - 3.0 ladies doubles player that is used to taking moonballs out of the air from no man's land to the service line and just hangs out there in mixed getting bludgeoned by dipping topspin at her feet
4) Alley Camper Adrian - stands and the junction of the service line and doubles alley and NEVER moves. Complains of a weak net game while failing repeatedly to salvage ankle high volleys.
5) Poaching Peter - doesn't matter the likelihood of a successful poach or how good (or bad) his partners serve is, he always attacks the middle. Gets passed repeatedly down the line, muttering "lucky shot" after every one. Nets one in two diving backhand volleys. Every 4th try, hammers a winner with a fist pump and "c'mon!!"
generally i'll take Poaching Peter any day, all day.

yesterday played dubs.
my partner, Poaching Peter, apologizes for missing 2 volleys... "i'll let those go next time".
i insisted that he remain aggressive, and he'll find his range
i win all my service games pretty easily... often getting 1-2 free ufe points (which i attribute to the returner looking up to see what my net partner is doing).

if my serve is so weak that it's getting pummeled or sent down the alley easily for a winner, i might suggest planned poaches/fakes... so i can get in sync as to when to cover his side.
if partner is missing alot of volleys, i'll suggest that i'm there to back him/her up if they want to let it go... (ie. i will presume every shot is mine,... so they are free to bail out if the ball is too far wide, low, etc...), but i'll still insist they remain aggressive.

most folks don't notice that aggressive net play often leads to unforced errors (but the winners and mistakes are what most folks only remember).
 
generally i'll take Poaching Peter any day, all day.

yesterday played dubs.
my partner, Poaching Peter, apologizes for missing 2 volleys... "i'll let those go next time".
i insisted that he remain aggressive, and he'll find his range
i win all my service games pretty easily... often getting 1-2 free ufe points (which i attribute to the returner looking up to see what my net partner is doing).

if my serve is so weak that it's getting pummeled or sent down the alley easily for a winner, i might suggest planned poaches/fakes... so i can get in sync as to when to cover his side.
if partner is missing alot of volleys, i'll suggest that i'm there to back him/her up if they want to let it go... (ie. i will presume every shot is mine,... so they are free to bail out if the ball is too far wide, low, etc...), but i'll still insist they remain aggressive.
I'm with you on Poaching Peter because when it comes to being too active vs not being active enough, 99% are not active enough. If it really is an issue, IMO it's easier to get someone who is too active to back down rather than someone who is inactive to poach more. You tell them, they nod their head, and they stay frozen, possibly because they were taught getting burned DTL is worth a game rather than a point.

most folks don't notice that aggressive net play often leads to unforced errors (but the winners and mistakes are what most folks only remember).
Most people only factor in what can be seen [we got burned DTL] vs what cannot easily be seen [the receivers made more errors than they would have otherwise because of our pressure in the middle]. What counts is not IF you got burned DTL but what the differential is between middle points won vs DTL points lost. As long as it's positive, I'm happy.

When my partner cuts across in front of me and misses a waist-high poach, I say "that's the right play; keep doing it!". Obviously, if he's volleying around his shoelaces it's a different story. Or if he's just a terrible volleyer.
 

OnTheLine

Hall of Fame
On poaching peter ... I generally agee that I want my partner to be aggressive ... and yes the more active the net person the more pressure you place on opponent.

HOWEVER,

A. If Poaching Peter is a pin-head and goes for low backhand volley poaches ... I will kill him. Let those go ... Do not touch them nice neutral ball for me
B. If Poaching Peter is a pin-head and poaches .. puts in a weak volley and then crosses back ... yeah, dead there too ... if you cross please keep going and don't cross back .. now you have put me in a pickle.
 

Dartagnan64

Legend
generally i'll take Poaching Peter any day, all day.

yesterday played dubs.
my partner, Poaching Peter, apologizes for missing 2 volleys... "i'll let those go next time".
i insisted that he remain aggressive, and he'll find his range
i win all my service games pretty easily... often getting 1-2 free ufe points (which i attribute to the returner looking up to see what my net partner is doing).

if my serve is so weak that it's getting pummeled or sent down the alley easily for a winner, i might suggest planned poaches/fakes... so i can get in sync as to when to cover his side.
if partner is missing alot of volleys, i'll suggest that i'm there to back him/her up if they want to let it go... (ie. i will presume every shot is mine,... so they are free to bail out if the ball is too far wide, low, etc...), but i'll still insist they remain aggressive.

most folks don't notice that aggressive net play often leads to unforced errors (but the winners and mistakes are what most folks only remember).
Agree if Poaching Peter actually does find his range. If Poaching Peter has hands of stone and Serving Susie can't get a weak reply, it's easy pickings DTL every time. People that love Poaching Peter's have good serves by and large. And their Poaching Peter's aren't throwing stabbing BH volleys into the net time and again.

The essence of Poaching Peter is that he sucks at the net but thinks he's awesome. Those guys won't help you win service games.
 

1990's Graphite

Professional
When your partner always plays low percentage points such as hitting it at the guy at the net, always, for easy put aways, and they have a whole court open or lob options, they make 1 out of 10.. winning!
 

ollinger

G.O.A.T.
1) sending an offensive lob over the team at net and then not moving forward
2) lobbing from mid court (usually too long) when a simple drive down the middle will surely win the point
3) aiming wide too often rather than down the middle
4) taking 2 steps toward a ball, then stopping and yelling "yours"
 

am1899

Hall of Fame
The partner that gives me “atta boys” for poaching and cleaning up...but if I miss one tells me to stay on “my side.” :rolleyes:

Partner continues hitting serve returns up the line, in spite of missing frequently, and the opponents aren’t fooled by it. Then, if I miss a return, they tell me, “we need to get more returns in play.” Right. :rolleyes:

Any partner that yells useless words to me during the point: “stay,” and “watch” come to mind.

Partner who can’t get their first serve in, but blames me for missing volleys at the net as returners are taking batting practice on all the second serves. :rolleyes:
 

bertrevert

Hall of Fame
A. If Poaching Peter is a pin-head and goes for low backhand volley poaches ... I will kill him. Let those go ... Do not touch them nice neutral ball for me
B. ....
Would add
C. If Poaching Peter is a pin-head and goes for high backhand volley poaches ... Let those go ... Do not touch them nice swinging/approach volley for me
 

bertrevert

Hall of Fame
When we are receiving and I know I will struggle to get past the net man and my partner... stands too much up at the net almost as if we are doing the serving. Ai vay.

I spend a lot of time asking partners to take a step of two back to be around the T because I know I am not the best returner.

When I return sure the net guy will get a volley, but it won't be an easy one, and I need my guy to be around the T ready for it.

So I have to communicate my expected pattern of play.

Is that my partner's fault or mine!

But just watch prof doubles and the receiving partner is often right near the T while the receiver hits cross-court.

If they are not there then they leave open a corridor for the poacher.
 
Ball Hogs. Not poachers, but ball hogs; you know the totally out-of-control player who chases after every ball like a dog - even if it's hit straight at his partner and not him. They allow themselves to get jerked all over the court by the opposing team who then dumps the ball into the part of the court that ball hog would have been covering if he'd been properly positioned. There is just no way to make up for the mess they create and good luck trying to get them to stop.
 
He misses his first serve. Then, his second serve is exactly the same. Nothing different. Needeless to say, he made many double faults. When I ask him to stop, he squeaks, but I have to PRACTICE.
Dont practice in a tournament next time.
 

bertrevert

Hall of Fame
, he squeaks, but I have to PRACTICE. Dont practice in a tournament next time.
I had partner turn up to comp and say "gee, it would be good if I had of hit a few balls outside of this match during the week".
And I thought gee do you reckon!
I wouldn't do that to someone, I wouldn't turn up if I hadn't hit a ball all week, esp not to a comp, sacrilege.
 
Ball Hogs. Not poachers, but ball hogs; you know the totally out-of-control player who chases after every ball like a dog - even if it's hit straight at his partner and not him. They allow themselves to get jerked all over the court by the opposing team who then dumps the ball into the part of the court that ball hog would have been covering if he'd been properly positioned. There is just no way to make up for the mess they create and good luck trying to get them to stop.
You mean like this?

 

hurworld

Hall of Fame
I'd rather have Poaching Pete than Stationary Sam, who camps in the dead centre of service box and only moves a muscle if the ball comes straight at him/her.
 

toby55555

Hall of Fame
Don't have a regular doubles partner as I mainly play singles but partners who never intercept are a drag.
 

Dartagnan64

Legend
I'd rather have Poaching Pete than Stationary Sam, who camps in the dead centre of service box and only moves a muscle if the ball comes straight at him/her.
Stationary Sam is still better than Alley Camper Adrian.

If you have a crappy serve, Stationary Sam and Alley Camper Adrian are probably doing their job. If you have a great serve, you need Poaching Peter on one of his rare good days.

Sam and Adrian won't win you points but they won't lose them either. Bad Poaching Peter can kill your service game if he wants.
 
Stationary Sam is still better than Alley Camper Adrian.

If you have a crappy serve, Stationary Sam and Alley Camper Adrian are probably doing their job. If you have a great serve, you need Poaching Peter on one of his rare good days.

Sam and Adrian won't win you points but they won't lose them either. Bad Poaching Peter can kill your service game if he wants.
In the short-run, I agree.

In the long-run, the poacher has way more potential than the statue or the alley camper.
 

Dartagnan64

Legend
In the short-run, I agree.

In the long-run, the poacher has way more potential than the statue or the alley camper.
yes If poaching Peter can get better he can become a force. I've made a living off ripping second serves DTL past bad Poaching Peters.

Bottom line: You have to pick your spots as the net man. There's a time for everything, including standing still or even playing back. Being flexible as a doubles partner is all I'm suggesting.

Poach if you are getting poachable returns. Stay put if they are ripping winners DTL. Hang back if they are lobbing every return. Play 2 back if you can't handle the heat coming your way. Don't be a one trick pony. The opponents will figure you out soon enough.
 
1. Not moving with the ball
2. Believing that the center line is a border that cannot be crossed.
3. Not switching when they are behind me & I've crossed.
4. Standing up in the service box when I'm returning. I've only had one partner capable of handling a volley that gets picked off.
5. After finally reaching break point, a partner that hits the second serve return three feet or longer out.

Is there anything I can accept?
1. Trying to poach and missing a shot.
Surely there must be something else...
 
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