What string brands actually produce IN HOUSE?

pabletion

Hall of Fame
#1
Ive heard Solinco, Diadem, Kirachbaum, all manufacture their strings in Taiwan, who else??? Or who do actually have their own factories??? I know Tecnifibre does produce in France, and I assume Babolat as well.

How bout the others???
 
#2
If your question is 'Which brand is 100% produced in-house?', I believe the answer is none of them. All the major string brands have limited in-house capabilities for R & D. And then some others will have the excess capacity to produce strings for others using NDAs. TOALSON seems to have the fewest strings available in the USA, and so you would think they could do everything in-house, until you see what they offer overseas. Strings are a commodity product to manufacture and I believe no plant manager wants to have his assets sitting around idle.
 
#3
Pros Pro does manufacture some of its strings in Germany. Tecnifibre manufactures some of its strings in France. Toalson manufactures some of its strings in Japan.
 
#5
hard to say for sure now a days,, where rebranding seems to be the name of the game
i really dont care too much tough, as long as quality is maintained for the price your paying for the product
 
#9
I thought Ashaway made all their strings in the US.
I wouldn't be surprised. I might have a mini reel of their Kevlar stashed away someplace, too. I'll look for the flag on that one if I find it.

I think that Ashaway makes lots of strings and filaments for different applications aside from racquet sports, too. Pretty sure that they're based not too far from where I'm hiding out... I should take a field trip. T-shirt or it never happened!!
 
#10
Interestingly, I purchased strings today from a new German brand called Grapplesnake. When talking about their strings, they also mentioned in their email that everything they have currently is produced in-house in Germany, even their packaging. I got three sets (Cube, Irukandji & CEO+ Liquid Neon hybrid).
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
#12
I wouldn't be surprised. I might have a mini reel of their Kevlar stashed away someplace, too. I'll look for the flag on that one if I find it.

I think that Ashaway makes lots of strings and filaments for different applications aside from racquet sports, too. Pretty sure that they're based not too far from where I'm hiding out... I should take a field trip. T-shirt or it never happened!!
Ashaway is in RI
 
#14
If your question is 'Which brand is 100% produced in-house?', I believe the answer is none of them. All the major string brands have limited in-house capabilities for R & D. And then some others will have the excess capacity to produce strings for others using NDAs. TOALSON seems to have the fewest strings available in the USA, and so you would think they could do everything in-house, until you see what they offer overseas. Strings are a commodity product to manufacture and I believe no plant manager wants to have his assets sitting around idle.
How are tennis strings a commodity product? Its not like they're used for anything else aren't they? I mean, I've thought of them as a speciality product, very specific and each of them with their own "formula" (unlike, coffee beans, cardamom....).

My question regards quality specifically, I dont know how true it can be that, if/when produced in Taiwan, for example, it means a cheaper more common poliester is used, whereas, those who produce "in house" (Luxilon, Tecnifibre, Babolat....) use, in the first place, better material, plus the higher QCQA that really make them overall better quality strings....

Not necessarily true, of course.
 
#15
How are tennis strings a commodity product?
A commodity is a basic good used in commerce that is interchangeable with other commodities of the same type.

I bet, 95%+ of strings are purchased by consumers who indeed do not care about the manufacturer. They would take whatever synthetic gut or whatever poly is recommended to them by the shop or by the stringer, and a small price difference would make them flip the brand. Or they would change to a different brand just for the sake of variety. In this sense, it is indeed a commodity, or close to being a commodity.

You and I may have a different opinion, and this is why we are participating in discussions in this section of the forum. Note, this is not the most well attended forum, by far.
 
#16
I wouldn't be surprised. I might have a mini reel of their Kevlar stashed away someplace, too. I'll look for the flag on that one if I find it.

I think that Ashaway makes lots of strings and filaments for different applications aside from racquet sports, too. Pretty sure that they're based not too far from where I'm hiding out... I should take a field trip. T-shirt or it never happened!!
Heard in the past from a surgeon that Ashaway make medical sutures - talk about a gut feeling!!
 
#17
Strings are made from plastic pellets. [excluding NG]. The pellets come in an enormous variety with different properties. However, they can be ordered from a catalog. Nothing really special yet. Now the pellets are mixed to a secret formula and melted. Then this melt is extruded as fine fibers for post processing into multis or bundles of braids and then combined with an outer sheath of material or not. Or it is extruded as a monocore that may or may not need post processing. Except for the secret sauce of the pellets, there is not much to the manufacture of strings. The equipment is standardized as is the die(s) and any required post processing.
 
#20
@Shroud in the past manufactured some Kevlar twisted string in California. I have no idea if he moved his processes to Florida or not. LOL
The wages are less in Fl so its more viable. But production remains slow. Trust me, I want to be a "job creator" but you can't just wake up and say "I am going to create a job today"...you need market and customers and demand. Shroudbite (R) was a disaster because it was impossible to string. But one day I will solve that.
 
#21
The wages are less in Fl so its more viable. But production remains slow. Trust me, I want to be a "job creator" but you can't just wake up and say "I am going to create a job today"...you need market and customers and demand. Shroudbite (R) was a disaster because it was impossible to string. But one day I will solve that.
Have you researched the feasibility to have it manufactured by another company? What are the benefits and challenges of that?
 
#22
Have you researched the feasibility to have it manufactured by another company? What are the benefits and challenges of that?
To be honest even though it was steel and kevlar, it was too soft for me. Though perhaps others would like it. The challenge is not so much the production, but the limpness of the kevlar. Its impossible to string. No shop would ever do it because the kevlar is in coated and frays. I would have to solve that before I could ever make it viable. And even solving that the coating flakes of too easily.

I appreciate the idea and its a great one, it just that poor Shroud has designed a lemon of a string...
 
#23
To be honest even though it was steel and kevlar, it was too soft for me. Though perhaps others would like it. The challenge is not so much the production, but the limpness of the kevlar. Its impossible to string. No shop would ever do it because the kevlar is in coated and frays. I would have to solve that before I could ever make it viable. And even solving that the coating flakes of too easily.

I appreciate the idea and its a great one, it just that poor Shroud has designed a lemon of a string...
Regardless of the result so far, mad props to Shroud for at least getting out there and trying to make a dream come true!!
 
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