What technique causes golfer's elbow

Discussion in 'Health & Fitness' started by Ramon, May 17, 2018 at 6:50 AM.

  1. Ramon

    Ramon Hall of Fame

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    I'm trying to find possible causes for my golfer's elbow. Please don't say "poly strings" or "stiff racquets". Equipment is not the cause, it's just a factor that aggravates it, and I already know what equipment aggravates my elbow the most. I'm thinking along the lines of technique. I've done some research, and it seems related to either flexing the wrist or pronating the arm. I don't think I'm flexing my wrist too much in my forehand, but I definitely think I'm pronating. Is that a likely cause? If so, what kind of technique would minimize it?
     
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  2. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Me,me,me...I got golfers elbow in early April, causing me to curtail tennis for a while and switch to ra-63 rackets until I heal up.
    I was pushing a screw into a too small hole and heard the distinctive POP.
     
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  3. Say Chi Sin Lo

    Say Chi Sin Lo G.O.A.T.

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    Bad technique causes bowler's elbow
     
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  4. r2473

    r2473 G.O.A.T.

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    Inadequate protein consumption
     
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  5. sredna42

    sredna42 Rookie

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    I got golfer's elbow, I think that incorrect technique is prolonging it, by contacting my forehand too late and not well in front, and same as the serve, impacting the ball when it is more above me, rather than above and forward. When I watched video of my fh (r-rated) it is kinda when the penny dropped.

    I got the initial injury by cranking on someone's neck with a headlock in a fight though LOL like an idiot....
     
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  6. MC London

    MC London New User

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    I suggest you take a video of your forehand and serve and if you can play it back through kinovea.org at slow 35/50% speed. It's a great free download. I had pretty bad golfers elbow a couple of years ago, took 11 months off. The modern game of trying to "swat" an opportunistic half/three quarter forehand combined with lack of conditioning and lack of an absolute forehand follow through was a contributing factor. The serve is another typical golfers elbow contributing factor. In my case muscling first serves with a throw up at 11 o'clock (I am left handed) coupled again with lacking proper conditioning. If you go to youtube and search under "MC1961" you will see a video of myself playing just prior to having medial epicondylitis (golfers elbow) at the end of 2015.

    Even before golfers elbow I was using soft natural gut strings, and have been playing with Pro Kennex flexible frames for 20 years. Conclusion forehand and serve - technique and lack of conditioning for the standard you are playing at.
     
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  7. SystemicAnomaly

    SystemicAnomaly G.O.A.T.

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    The primary factor that results in GE is usually from clenching the racket too tightly. This can be due to a grip that is too small or too large or it could simply be to a bad habit of squeezing too hard and too much time. This excessive squeezing combined with vigorous wrist actions or forearm actions can often cause GE.

    Tennis GE usually occurs with serves and/or FHs gstrokes. Pronation alone doesn't account for GE. The finger clenching, sometimes with excessive wrist actions, that is the tru culprit most of the time.

    Keep your fingers Relaxed (but not overly loose) most of the time. Death grips are counterproductive for power as well as being taxing on the forearm/elbow.
     
    Last edited: May 21, 2018 at 11:37 PM
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  8. HouTex

    HouTex Rookie

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    You shouldn’t assume it has to be technique driven although it’s possible that it is. It may be just over use. Could also be age. How old are you and how long have you been playing?
     
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  9. joe sch

    joe sch Legend

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    Understanding Tennis Elbow vs. Golfers Elbow / Dr. Mandell

    Understanding the difference between Tennis Elbow and Golfers Elbow is important. Accumulative Stress Disorder is a repetitive condition that stresses the muscles of the forearm causing them to inflame. There are specific ways these conditions can be treated. Dr. Mandell

    Here is more explanation from the Doc
     
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  10. Ramon

    Ramon Hall of Fame

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    I'm 53 and I've been playing tennis since middle school, so I know age is a factor. I never noticed any arm pain until I was in my 30's and started experimenting with Kevlar strings. Pain went away when I went back to synthetic gut. Right now, my arm feels perfectly fine if I play with an arm-friendly racquet and use non-poly strings. The fact that it I can't play with certain racquets or strings without feeling pain makes me curious about why that's happening.
     
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  11. HouTex

    HouTex Rookie

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    I developed TE at age 51 and I too have played since middle school. I have never played with poly strings. I did switch racquets just prior to getting TE but I also was playing more golf than usual. In my case I think it's safe to say that it was not a technique issue. It was age and over use and failing to stop playing as soon as the pain set in. I always healed quickly from other minor injuries and I was too arrogant to believe TE could become a serious issue for me.

    My mistake was thinking that I could just take it easy for a few weeks and it would heal. I played in a tournament (mixed doubles) and by the end of the tournament my elbow was in serious pain. It took 20 months of pretty much constant therapy (both at home and with a PT), including cortisone shots, Graston treatments, etc., before I could play without pain and with different, arm-friendly, racquets (Prince EXO3 and the Volkl Classic V1).

    As for how important the racquet can be, when I was starting to play again I tried hitting with my old Wilson Hyper Prostaff 6.1 (which I played without pain for several years until I switched to the Wilson LS100 and then came down with TE). Every time I hit the ball I felt a sting in my elbow--even balls hit perfectly in the sweet spot. In the same practice session I put it down and hit the Prince EXO3 (with the same multi strings) and had no pain at all.
     
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  12. Ramon

    Ramon Hall of Fame

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    You're basically in my situation. I'm perfectly fine if I stay away from poly and use an arm-friendly Pro Kennex or Prince racquet. I think most people would look at my form and say it's really good, but with certain equipment I get golfer's elbow. I suppose the form on my backhand is really good because I never get tennis elbow no matter what equipment I'm using. The other day I was hitting with a Babolat Pure Strike 16x19. I really love that racquet, but about an hour into it I started feeling some pain in my elbow. It was bearable, but just the fact that it was there was concerning. Don't know if maybe a subtle change in my forehand might cure that, especially since it wasn't too severe.
     
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  13. jga111

    jga111 Hall of Fame

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    Tight grip.
    Swinging with a locked wrist.
     
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