What was the last movie you watched?

Discussion in 'Odds & Ends' started by jamesblakefan#1, Mar 22, 2010.

  1. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

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    Morning Glory (1933) - Katherine Hepburn's first film for which she won an Academy Award. Douglas Fairbanks, Jr, and Adolphe Menjou.

    Interesting movie about a small time stage actress who dreams big, based apparently on the life of Tallulah Bankhead.
     
  2. onehandbh

    onehandbh Legend

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    Train to Busan.
    It's about a train full of people with cataracts and poor night vision.
     
  3. tennytive

    tennytive Professional

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    The Brothers Grimsby.

    Halfway through it turns into a documentary about the mating habits of elephants… What the?
     
  4. stringertom

    stringertom Bionic Poster

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    I just watched The Waterboy again for the umpteenth time...comedic geniuses to put Sandler, Winkler and Bates together!
     
  5. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

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    Night Train to Lisbon (2013)

    Seeing it again after barely a year. Nice philosophical movie related to the Salazar dictatorship in Portugal and some people who were in the resistance. Jeremy Irons plays an old teacher/professor.


    Detour (1945) - Tom Neal, Ann Savage. Interesting, classic noir.
    Two unforgettable characters. A man hitch-hiking to LA runs into the oddest of people.
     
  6. Firstservingman

    Firstservingman G.O.A.T.

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    Nice avatar. :D
     
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  7. Bagumbawalla

    Bagumbawalla Hall of Fame

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    Saw Hell or High Water- first half was good- lots of little silly things that developed character atmosphere- toward the end it got more "preachy/talky" and implausible.

    Saw Sausage Party- nothing good,funny, smart, or worthwhile about this film.

    Saw Kubo and the Two Strings- visually appealing. Sort of a Japanese fairy tail, but reasons characters behaved as they did and outcomes resolve as they did- did not always follow or make sense. Also there was no mention of two strings as far as I could tell- except in the title.
     
  8. ollinger

    ollinger Legend

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    "Sully"

    It's only been 7 years since he landed a plane in the Hudson RIver, a little too quick for a movie to be of much interest, but this one has something timely to say about whether people can be judged against the performance of other people or the performance of machines. Well made, moving at times.
     
  9. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

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    Since you went away (1944) - claudette_colbert, jennifer jones, shirley temple, robert walker.

    Three hours long. Should have been a 5-part mini-series.
     
  10. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

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    Time After Time (1979) - asinine scifi movie.

    HG Wells goes forward in time in his time machine to catch Jack the Ripper.
     
  11. NonP

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    Not sure I can even recall all the movies I've seen since my last housekeeping, but I return mainly to give an enthusiastic thumbs-up to two underappreciated titles, one still playing in the theaters and the other from three years back:

    You might be inclined to give it another go after reading this post of mine. It's admittedly more a paean to the novel than to the movie, but I really thought the DiCaprio-starring Luhrmann screen adaptation, warts and all, was the first one I saw that did justice to Fitzgerald's masterpiece.

    One thing I forgot to add: Mulligan's Daisy never utters the words "such beautiful shirts" in the crucial scene, which I'd long felt was an egregious omission as the shirts as erotic objects for Daisy forebode the unbridgeable gulf between her and Gatsby, but after reflection I now think that caesura was a masterstroke. Withholding that ominous phrase enhances the sexual ambiguity of Daisy and in turn that of Gatsby himself, which hovers over the entire film even after the titular hero meets his tragic end. Now there's reason to doubt that this was an intentional omission on Luhrmann's part, given his general lack of restraint, but we know art has a way of expressing itself without the full cognizance of the creator, and if this was one such instance, so be it when we're all left better off.

    It's still not quite a masterpiece and we should be wary of grand predictions by anyone, but I expect time will judge this Gatsby adaptation much more favorably. Easily Baz's best movie (with the only possible exception of Australia, which I've yet to see).

    And now the more recent one:

    Only "visually appealing"? I'd probably rate it the best animated film of the year thus far. I suspect the reason why the movie has not been marketed more aggressively is its weak box-office receipts (I should add here that the critics to their credit didn't let that stop them from judging it on its own merits this time, though something tells me that has to do with their general patronizing of animated films and their overall scores would change considerably were Kubo a live-action one instead), but I also suspect its weak box office has to do with its unusually mature examination of the human experience. Kubo isn't just a hackneyed tale of a hero overcoming a series of setbacks, but of one destined to deal with the tragic loss of his family, and by casting the hero's own grandfather and aunts as villains the movie also begs the audience to ask what price they might need to pay when forced to choose between family and righteousness.

    Now Kubo does fall short of greatness (pace some of the critics who nominated it as one of the year's masterpieces) by making that choice for us, and you feel that's as far as a studio family film can go even if the filmmakers dare to go further. Also I'm not sure how much voice work McConaughey had done before Kubo, but his monotonic, soulless Beetle/Hanzo as the titular hero's father sticks out like a sore pest next to Charlize Theron's heartfelt Monkey/Sariatu as the maternal counterpart. And the two partners as Kubo's sidekicks have no chemistry whatsoever (indeed the only time you feel a genuine sparkle between the two is when Monkey recounts how she, an evil spirit, first met Hanzo, a mortal human, as his would-be assassin but ended up falling in love with him, all this in a flashback showing the couple in silhouette only), though much of the blame lies with the screenwriters who failed to flesh out the two characters befitting a literally legendary couple.

    Still Kubo deserves to be on any best-of-2016 list and will likely make mine at the year-end. I can only think of two serious animated contenders I've seen so far this year: Disney's Zootopia and a French-Belgian-Canadian gem called April and the Extraordinary World (alternatively April and the Twisted World--the film in fact debuted in 2015 but wasn't shown in North America till this year). Zootopia is easily the funniest of the three (I saw it late at night in a sparely attended theater, but the hysterical DMV scene with the sloths still had the whole auditorium giggling in stitches) as well as a surprisingly nuanced take on the dangers of racism/nativism/jingoism and a much-timely middle finger at Trump and his fellow demagogues around the world, and I could listen to the impossibly lovely-voiced Ginnifer Goodwin (playing the heroine Judy Hopps) all day, but you know from the get-go how it's going to turn out. April if anything features an even more sympathetic protagonist (the unconventionally plain title female character, ably voiced by Marion Cotillard in the original French version I saw) than Kubo and its quaint animation is a charmer in its own right, but it's also arguably even darker, and despite its happy ending you feel the filmmakers don't entirely reject Rodrigue's misanthropy when the lizard antagonist observes that music is one of the only few worthwhile contributions to society made by the humans.

    So perhaps my preference for Kubo is largely a matter of taste. No matter, it deserves more recognition than its box office suggests and Travis Knight himself deserves much credit for his most promising directorial debut. Watch it in the theater while you can. It's a clearly superior effort to the much-lauded Inside Out.

    Onto the housekeeping:

    I wasn't really bowled over by this sequel, I'm afraid. The consensus seems to be that it fails to measure up to Nemo and perhaps my opinion of the franchise will change after I finally see the original, but given the inordinate fanfare bestowed on last year's Inside Out I have my doubts.

    That's what they say about Allen's oeuvre, but I actually enjoyed this one more than most of his films including the celebrated Annie Hall, Manhattan, etc. His characters are still far from full-bodied but they actually feel two-dimensional now compared to the decidedly one-dimensional ones of yore, and I also like the fact that he no longer tries to hide it with his bons mots that usually serve as nothing more than calculated instruments to stroke the audience's faux sophistication while providing little edification of his own. That more than anything else is why his stock has fallen among the critics and cineastes, and I say that's a good thing.

    I actually saw this one on a flight. It's a fine directorial debut by Hoffman, though in the end a slight one. The best thing about it was Billy Connolly as the shamelessly flirty geezer "Wilf" Bond.

    BTW on that same round trip I also happened to catch The Great Beauty and Hirokazu Koreeda's masterful Like Father, Like Son, which along with Son of Saul are among the only three films of this decade I'm ready to declare masterpieces. A pretty decent movie selection, I'd say. ;)

    I really don't see what's to love about it. Like Star Wars it fosters this twisted logic that mass murder is a-OK as long as you kill the "bad guys" only. And it apparently thinks the ugly violence can be made more palatable by the thoroughly unserious hero's wisecracks. Of course the audience loved it and was eager for the sequel. It's instances like this that make you question the validity of democracy.
     
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  12. NonP

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    And a few more....

    This latest Bourne is the first movie I ever saw in the Dolby Atmos format which I found too much of a good thing (I had to cover my ears at times 'cause it was so damn loud!), but I don't see how it was that much worse than other popcorn flicks of late. Not quite as riveting and diverting as last year's Mission Impossible, but I like how both films feature flawed heroes in sharp contrast to the cartoonish superheroes we're inundated with these days, and also how they mostly refrain from gratuitous violence and mayhem unlike the aforementioned Deadpool.

    The Revenant OTOH is a loathsome flotsam of a blockbuster. I explained why here.

    I enjoyed the comic tone of The Big Short myself but hated its smug cynicism, which as I've pointed out before is designed to make the audience feel superior without inviting much self-reflection let alone action on their part. No wonder it won the Oscar for Best Adapted Screenplay.

    Busan was another fine piece of summer entertainment from Korea, but its director Yeon Sang-ho would do well to pay attention to the measured pacing of his compatriot Na Hong-jin's The Wailing to see how one can create suspense and horror without relentless action. That's probably why it feels more like schlock, though it's still superior to most other horror/zombie flicks out there.
     
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  13. Moose Malloy

    Moose Malloy Legend

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    Have you seen the Alan Ladd version of gatsby? I missed it at a film noir festival a while back, sounded interesting.
    Woody Allen has a new show with Elaine May on Amazon premiering sept 30 btw.
     
  14. DRII

    DRII G.O.A.T.

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    finally saw Revenant. excellent movie! one where I actually wanted to see more after 2 1/2 hours. the movie actually seemed like it ended too soon. I could have watched for another hour...
     
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  15. NonP

    NonP Hall of Fame

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    Afraid not, though I do see that the '49 version pace Wiki is in fact readily available on DVD. Believe it or not I own very few DVDs/Blu-rays (probably because I tend to view cinema as an extension of literature and few films mean as much to me as my all-time favorite books) and prefer to stream movies rather than have them take up my real estate, plus the blabbermouths don't seem to like the oldie much even now. So it'll probably be a while before I get around to it. :p

    It's a virtual truism in cinema that great books generally don't translate into great films, but there are a few notable exceptions. I've already argued the latest Gatsby is one. Another is John Huston’s Wise Blood based on O'Connor's extraordinary debut novel. Stuart Klawans recently contributed a fine appreciation of the film to the Library of America's laudable The Moviegoer series.

    Read about that upcoming Allen show before but didn't know about May coming on board. It'll be nice to see her again but I wish she'd direct instead (I know I'm not the only one who'd rank her Mikey and Nicky above anything by Allen), though I know that's unlikely given her age and perfectionism. (However I do see that she recently directed a doc on her longtime friend and colleague Nichols.)

    Also I see that Zootopia is now available on Netflix, so without further ado here's the hilarious sloth scene I mentioned earlier:



    Given its brief length it doesn't really qualify as a full-blown satire, but I can't imagine anyone who has set foot in a DMV not grinning and nodding his/her head at the utterly apt parody here. :D Pure comedy gold.

    A couple more titles I saw recently:

    - Hunt for the Wilderpeople by Taika Waititi

    It's one of the early contenders for the year's best and the plaudits are well deserved, but I can't help but think it could've been much better. Given the exotic background of protagonist Ricky (played by Julian Dennison) and the age gap between him and the grumpy Uncle Hec (Sam Neill) there were myriad opportunities for both social and self-critique, but Waititi seems to have been content making a feel-good buddy film instead. Which is a shame, as he's clearly a promising talent. Maybe next time.

    - Lo and Behold: Reveries of the Connected World by Werner Herzog

    On paper the grand subject should be right up the alley for the equally grandiloquent Herzog, and much of the history of the Internet is indeed quite fascinating, but the documentary suffers a crushing blow once it attempts to move from presentation to analysis. The film is segmented into 10 sketchy chapters, the most egregious of which purports to examine the pitfalls of online activity. As an example of this admittedly serious and potentially existential danger Herzog brings on... a clearly white upper-middle-class family one of whose daughters' death is captured online (on her own mobile phone, if memory serves) and who is hounded by despicable strangers who bombard them with said horrific images with impunity. It's no doubt a deplorable situation and you can't help but sympathize with the family, but was this really the best representative example Herzog could muster? And why such a narrow focus when the rest of the film is concerned with such sweeping themes? Anyone who has seen his powerful anti-texting/driving PSA From One Second to the Next will miss the diversity of its participants and the single-mindedness of its message here (though I concede that the latter was made easier especially for the ambitious Herzog by its more limited scope).

    The rest of the film is similarly unsatisfying. When Sebastian Thrun pontificates, however jokingly, on how artificial intelligence will eventually surpass even the most creative human minds like Herzog you see why scientists would do well to focus on what they do best and leave the humanities to those who actually know what they're talking about. But then this hubris is countered by Lawrence Krauss in a rare instance of intellectual humility when he correctly notes that anyone who makes grand predictions far into the future should not be taken seriously. Herzog does virtually nothing to reconcile such diametrically opposed views, and that's what makes the film so frustrating for those who can't figure out what he was up to. Perhaps the man wasn't sure himself, which makes this effort more miss than hit, though there's still much to recommend it. In other words a typical Herzog feature.
     
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  16. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

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    In This Our Life (1942) - Bette Davis, Olivia de Havilland

    Interesting movie about two rival sisters.
     
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  17. nowhereman

    nowhereman Legend

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    @The Green Mile (1999)

    It was good. Thought it was a bit boring at first, but it really picked up at around the hour mark. Would recommend.
     
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  18. Sentinel

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    My Man Godfrey (1936) - William Powell, Carole Lombard, Gail Patrick

    Funny old comedy. Got it on archive.org (public domain).
     
  19. ollinger

    ollinger Legend

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    "Snowden"

    A little too preachy and pedantic, I much preferred the Snowden documentary "Citizenfour"
     
  20. Sentinel

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    Tomorrow is Forever (1946) - Claudette Colbert, George Brent, Orson Welles

    Nice movie about a man who goes to war and "dies", his wife remarries. (It's available on archive.org as are many other old movies)
     
  21. SumYungGai

    SumYungGai Rookie

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    Snowden. Was decent. Next, time for Blair Witch!
     
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  22. Firstservingman

    Firstservingman G.O.A.T.

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    That's exactly where I am right now too. :D
     
  23. vive le beau jeu !

    vive le beau jeu ! G.O.A.T.

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    a soviet movie about cuba, filmed in 1963-1964 with the stories taking place right before the revolution (during batista's rule).
    apparently, it was poorly received both in cuba and in the USSR at the time... and forbidden in the US !
    coppola and scorcese then "rediscovered" the movie in the 90's...
    (but the director isn't "unknown" at all... he even got a palme d'or at cannes for another movie)


    (stunning "long take" from 2:00 on...)

    an original experience : it was like nothing i saw before (and way more entertaining than the previous zzzsoviet movies i saw !)... the way of filming was impressive :)
    each time you make "pause" you have the impression to be looking at a photo from an exhibition !
    and the music adds to the atmosphere......
     
    Last edited: Sep 26, 2016
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  24. YetAnotherFedFan

    YetAnotherFedFan Hall of Fame

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    The Clan, an argentine movie set in the post military junta era of the early 80s.

    An ostensibly normal, middle class family is headed by a sociopath who kidnaps wealthy residents of Buenos Aires and coerces his adult sons to help him. Based on the true story of Archimedes Puccio and his family.

    I thought it was very well acted, would recommend.
     
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  25. YetAnotherFedFan

    YetAnotherFedFan Hall of Fame

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    The Hunt for the Wilderpeople, a New Zealand movie about the bonding of a child in foster care and a recent widower while on the run from the authorities in the woods. Sensitively done.
     
  26. ollinger

    ollinger Legend

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    "The Magnificent Seven" (2016)

    The Cliche Seven. Every western you've ever seen synthesized into a star vehicle with a more politically correct group of heros. I felt like the Japanese ninja fighter wandered onto the wrong movie set.
     
  27. CivicLx

    CivicLx Hall of Fame

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    Last movie I saw in the theater was Deepwater Horizon. Last Blu Ray was X-Men: Apocalypse and before I left home to come have lunch at Roundtable, I was watching Ghosts of Mississippi on TV. I have not seen GoM before but I really enjoyed what I saw.
     
  28. maleyoyo

    maleyoyo Semi-Pro

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    Magnificent Seven remake version 1.

    Another clumsy attempt from Hollywood to reinvent itself for the modern PC world.

    But must they turn such classics “Seven Samurai” and “Magnificent Seven” into Marvel comics characters/ popcorn TV too?
     
  29. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

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    Yeah it sounded quite unbelievable that a group of guys from that time and place would ever accept a Black guy as their leader. The political correctness was not the casting of Denzel Washington as you might be thinking, but the portrayal of the rest of the group.
     
  30. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

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    I saw the new Blair Witch
     
  31. Chadillac

    Chadillac Legend

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    1080p version of Back to School, finished off silicon valley last night
     
  32. MrRandom247

    MrRandom247 Semi-Pro

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    Robocop (Blu-ray [R] rated version) 1987
    An old teen favorite. Violence is off the charts.
    Not so subtle examination of corporate America & fascination with violence & money.
    Weller did an excellent portrayal of the cyborg police officer with a tortured soul.

    TV
    Bosch season 2
    LA crime drama based upon Michael Connely's homicide detective Harry Bosch novels.
    Always liked Titus Welliver from Deadwood & Marvel's Agents Of Shield.
    Seems to have a few actors & a similar tone to The Wire.
    Excellent stuff, shame I have to wait for another season now...

    Brooklyn Nine Nine
    Great fun witty police comedy.
    Often watch this to lighten my day & then go to bed.

    Another TV bundle to watch soon:
    Game Of Thrones (latest season)
    Walking Dead (latest season)
    Sons Of Anarchy (latest 2 seasons)
    DC Legends of Tomorrow
    Halcyon
     
    Last edited: Oct 10, 2016
  33. SumYungGai

    SumYungGai Rookie

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    Just saw it last night. Wish it would have been better. Also, so many quick cuts. It was annoying.
     
  34. Midaso240

    Midaso240 Hall of Fame

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    Carlito's Way (1993). A companion piece of sorts to De Palma's earlier Scarface (1983),I always preferred this one though...
     
  35. CivicLx

    CivicLx Hall of Fame

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    Watched Purge: Election Year tonight. Frank Grillo is a badass
     
  36. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

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    It had its moments but was not good enough
     
  37. Rusty Shackleford

    Rusty Shackleford G.O.A.T.

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    Sounds like the fantastic Terence Malick film from the early 70s Badlands. Then he followed up in the late 70s with the same theme in Days of Heaven.
     
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  38. Rusty Shackleford

    Rusty Shackleford G.O.A.T.

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    No mention of John Turturro? ;)
     
  39. ollinger

    ollinger Legend

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    "The Magnificent Seven" SPOILER ALERT
    Yes, clearly the rest of the group. Noteworthy that the ones who get killed are all non-Hispanic white males and one Japanese guy. The ones who survive are an African American, a Native American, a Hispanic, and a woman. Maybe there's even something said here about economics, the ones killed representing the leading capitalist economies in the world, the ones who survive all being the underclasses. It was all a little too cute.
     
  40. maleyoyo

    maleyoyo Semi-Pro

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    It's all part of Hollywood's on-going Apology Tour:)
     
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  41. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

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    If there is more than one female, only the better-looking one usually survives. The same one who early on rips off her clothes in order to be free to take on the dinosaur, anaconda, mutant shark, or whatever.
     
  42. Bagumbawalla

    Bagumbawalla Hall of Fame

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    Saw Miss Perigrin's Home for Peculiar Children. It was not awful, nor was it special in any way whatsoever-- like bland porridge. Also, saw Deadpool. It was entertaining for what it was. Might have been better if it had a more evil villain.
     
  43. Rafaisdabest

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    Titanic :)
    I watched it with @oztennisfan who had never seen the full movie before and he rated it 10/10 which is correct in my book :p
     
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  44. Rafaisdabest

    Rafaisdabest Hall of Fame

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    Orphan (2009)
    Thriller/Drama
     
  45. chikoo

    chikoo Hall of Fame

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    Woody Allen's Power of the Jade Scorpion
     
  46. Ronaldo

    Ronaldo G.O.A.T.

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    Hot Tub Time Machine 2. Easily the worst flick ever. Since Cloverfield 2 or Hoosiers
     
  47. ollinger

    ollinger Legend

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    "The Accountant"

    in this politically correct culture, WHEN are we going to get an autistic action hero?? Perhaps your wait is over. Entertaining mix of action, intrigue, and psychological mystery.
     
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  48. Crocodile

    Crocodile Hall of Fame

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    Watched the telemovie about Peter Brock (Australian car racer, not to be confused with a car racer in U.S. With the same name).
     
  49. YetAnotherFedFan

    YetAnotherFedFan Hall of Fame

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    Saw American Honey. A plot line borrowed from Death of a Salesman and Lord of the Flies, juxtaposed into a gritty modern day Americana.

    Well acted though and I suspect there was a fair degree of improvisation as many of the caste had no formal actor training.
     
  50. fireandwind

    fireandwind Professional

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    I can tell by just looking at the film title. It sounds like totally adult film+ XXX or whatever they call it in other countries.
     

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