What was the last movie you watched?

Nostradamus

Bionic Poster
Which one do you like more between " Tomorrow ever after" and " Killing Sacred Deer"?
Very tough call. but Tomorrow ever after is more of feel good movie for the holidays. and Killing sacred deer is really dark and sinister movie. both really good but I would say Tomorrow ever after since this is holiday season.
 

sarmpas

Hall of Fame
It (2017) and Annabelle (2014). It reminded me too much of films like A Nightmare on Elm Street, where the main characters go monster hunting. It was a quality production, enjoyed it, but no scares for me whereas Annabelle had a few good jump-scares.
 
Z

Zara

Guest
Watched a few movies over the past few weeks. It Follows wasn't so bad set in the 80s. Hush was pretty good in fact. I loved the moment when she finally comes into terms of the fact that the only way to escape the situation was to kill her attacker. And it takes a series of failed attempts to escape the trap to finally realize that. That was the pivotal moment for me as far this movie went.

Recommend Paris Can Wait to Sentinel. It's funny in a very subtle way and loved the ending. Enjoyed the subtle exchanges between the two characters - not to mention, the conversations. It's not for Richie, no. lol. Had to throw that in.
 
Lady Bird is fantastic!
Three Billboards outside Ebbing, Missouri is awesome too
The Disaster Artist also my top 5 movies in 2017

Also watched this week: I, Tonya, Stronger, and Battle of Sexes
I'm trying to cross off all movies in GG nomination before Academy Awards.
 
Last edited:

sarmpas

Hall of Fame
I couldn't even finish the first one. I liked Logan though. It's getting harder for me to watch Superhero movies I find enjoyable. I feel the genre has been overexploited.
Fair comment. Marvel comics was part of my very early childhood and as I'm from the UK my local newsagent only had a small selection of titles and not always the same ones every month so following a hero/story line was not always easy. Now that films are being made I can't get enough of them although I understand for less enthusiastic fans film after film after film can seem too much.

For obsessed fans it gets even better with Disney's agreement to buy 21st Century Fox(licenses for The X-Men, Deadpool and the Fantastic Four). Now future XM and FF films will have the actual Marvel team behind them.
 

Comb Over Champion

Hall of Fame
Fair comment. Marvel comics was part of my very early childhood and as I'm from the UK my local newsagent only had a small selection of titles and not always the same ones every month so following a hero/story line was not always easy. Now that films are being made I can't get enough of them although I understand for less enthusiastic fans film after film after film can seem too much.

For obsessed fans it gets even better with Disney's agreement to buy 21st Century Fox(licenses for The X-Men, Deadpool and the Fantastic Four). Now future XM and FF films will have the actual Marvel team behind them.
I can see how for a fan of the genre this would be a blessing. Enjoy!
 

Sentinel

Bionic Poster
The Importance of Being Earnest (1952) - Oscar Wilde. Michael Redgrave. Funny, light.

Alone in Berlin (2016) - Emma Thompson and Brendan Gleeson. Interesting movie, based on a real life story about a couple who resist the Na-zis.


Recommend Paris Can Wait to Sentinel. It's funny in a very subtle way and loved the ending. Enjoyed the subtle exchanges between the two characters - not to mention, the conversations. It's not for Richie, no. lol. Had to throw that in.
Thanks for the recommendation.Will catch it.
 

Sentinel

Bionic Poster
Recommend Paris Can Wait to Sentinel. It's funny in a very subtle way and loved the ending. Enjoyed the subtle exchanges between the two characters - not to mention, the conversations. It's not for Richie, no. lol. Had to throw that in.
Gave that to my mother on her iPad. She loved it.

Finally finished Alone In Berlin (2016). Liked it.
 

Sentinel

Bionic Poster
Still Mine (2012) - James Cromwell, Genevieve Bujold.

Touching movie about an 88 yo man trying to build a small house single-handedly for his ailing wife, but faces tremendous hurdles from the Building department and then the courts. True story. He was being hauled to the courts at the age of 91 !

ecommend Paris Can Wait to Sentinel. It's funny in a very subtle way and loved the ending. Enjoyed the subtle exchanges between the two characters - not to mention, the conversations. It's not for Richie, no. lol. Had to throw that in.
You might like Still Mine.
 
Z

Zara

Guest
I watched Crimson Peak - a gothic horror - last week and I really enjoyed it.

Sentinel, I wonder if you'd like Night Train to Lisbon.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Sentinel

Bionic Poster
Currently watching Coma (1978) - Michael Douglas, Genevieve Bujold.

We are watching it because it was talked about a lot when it came out by our close doctor friends.
Just saw Bujold yesterday as a 70 yo in Still Mine. Here she is 36.

Sentinel, I wonder if you'd like Night Train to Lisbon.
Loved it.
We saw it in 2015 and again in 2016.
 

NonP

Hall of Fame
OK, major housekeeping ahead.

"Lady Bird"

Unexceptional coming-of-age film built around mother-daughter tension; Saoirse Ronan is delightful.
Lady Bird is fantastic!
Three Billboards outside Ebbing, Missouri is awesome too
The Disaster Artist also my top 5 movies in 2017

Also watched this week: I, Tonya, Stronger, and Battle of Sexes
I'm trying to cross off all movies in GG nomination before Academy Awards.
Saw Three Billboards Outside of Ebbing, Missouri.

It is an intense movie full of hate-driven, stupid people doing hateful stupid things.

Not a bad movie, really, but difficult to watch. Not share it is worth the effort.
Like 2016's Manchester by the Sea (with all due respect to Lonergan's superior previous feature Margaret), both Lady Bird and Call Me by Your Name, the other coming-of-age favorite of 2017, are movies for the smartphone era, composed of bite-size pieces that we are supposed to respond to accordingly a la Pavlov's dogs but which do not add up to a cohesive whole. Of course that actually worked in their favor, given the truncated attention span of many consumers and apparently many professional reviewers today.

If I had to choose I'd say I prefer Lady Bird even though it's the less arty of the two, as the rapport between the titular character (in a fine performance by Golden Globe winner Ronan) and her mother (even more ably portrayed by Laurie Metcalf) is undeniable. Lots of people seem to feel the same about Timothée Chalamet's Elio and Armie Hammer's Oliver in CMBYN and I suppose I should take their word for it, but I can say this for myself: never once in the entire film did their relationship feel convincing to this particular viewer. Since I seem to be firmly in the minority in this matter I'm prepared to admit to a failing on my part, but some of the blame lies with the casting itself which asks us to (make-)believe that the devilishly handsome Oliver would be instantly taken with the lanky adolescent Elio. And for those who claim to be "devastated" by the movie's protracted closing shot of Elio brooding over the latest news (I'll refrain from spoiling it here, though you could see it coming a mile away), I urge them to check out Naruse's When a Man Ascends the Stairs and Yearning which both conclude with a most indelible image of the heroine (played in both films by Hideko Takamine) - with the only possible exception of City Lights', the two greatest close-ups in all of cinema - if only to see what real devastation is like, and in the most economical, concentrated expression imaginable.

Three Billboards just won the Globe for Best Drama because in the current battleground over identity politics sexism is a bigger culpa non grata than racism. The movie will ultimately fade from memory as its shallow and confused treatment of its subject matter is gradually exposed.

I did like The Disaster Artist though it doesn't transcend the trappings of a standard biopic. Given the outsize influence of The Room as a veritable cult classic James Franco's collaboration with his bro Dave (who BTW was just as effective in The Little Hours) and his BFF Seth Rogen could've been a lot more. I understand this may be an apples-to-oranges comparison as Robert Crumb is an infinitely more important artist than Tommy Wiseau, but Crumb the documentary shows how one can probe the grotesque and seemingly impenetrable for real insights.

I, Tonya boasts one of the strongest casts of 2017 but still turned out to be a disappointment. My previous encounter with Craig Gillespie was through his 2007 feature Lars and the Real Girl which if anything begins with an even more outrageous premise, but it does not traffic in the nonstop smart-aleck shtick of his latest feature which contrary to his stated aim brings more empty bluster than genuine "empathy" to its subjects. I hope for Gillespie's sake that he has not succumbed to the fleeting vicious pleasures of Twitter, as he's clearly a promising talent who knows how to get the most out of his actors.

Like I said upthread Battle of the Sexes is one of the better biopics, but apart from its touching depiction of BJK's affair with her hairdresser (in real life her former secretary Marilyn Barnett) it's thoroughly middlebrow fare.

Missed Stronger during its brief theatrical run.

Watched Death in Venice (1971) - Luchino Visconti. With Dirk Bogarde.
Some lovely shots of Venice - Kael compared them to works by Eugène Boudin, only even more "voluptuous" - but I can't say this is one of the better Visconti films. Which is quite strange, as both the director and Bogarde were gay and the latter was especially memorable a decade earlier as the closeted protagonist in Victim whose long-suppressed passions felt so raw and palpable. This putative Thomas Mann adaptation on the other hand has less to do with the book or its subject than with its setting and zeitgeist (for one thing Mann based Gustav von Aschenbach in his novel on Mahler, while Visconti turns him into a composer). It's almost as if Visconti adapted Venice itself and then transplanted the Mann characters, with Aschenbach's object of desire Tadzio standing in for all that is beauteous and luminous about the city and its culture.

And that brings me to why I must rate Visconti dead last among the great Italian directors (the others being Rossellini, Antonioni, De Sica and Fellini, in that order), though I'd probably rank The Leopard the greatest Italian film ever made (or at the very least my all-time fave). Apart from Senso I can't think of any other film by Visconti that could conceivably belong in such exalted company, while I can think of at least three by the other Italian masters. Of course Visconti unlike the other four was as active in theater and opera as in cinema, but you don't get extra credit for that.

I just learned Gary Oldman has been nominated for a Golden Globe as Best Actor for his role as Churchill in "Darkest Hour." He is one of my current era favorites and I hope he earns the Oscar too! The guy is an amazing talent. His Stansfield role in Leon: The Professional was pure outrageous terror!
"Darkest Hour"

Strongly character-driven drama of Winston Churchill's anguish. Gary Oldman can start writing his Oscar speech.
I know Ronan just beat out Robbie for the Best Actress Globe but my bet is still on Oldman and Robbie for the respective Oscar. I've never completely warmed to Oldman's over-the-top scream-acting, but if there were ever a figure (historical or not) for whom such theatrics are not only appropriate but welcome it's Churchill, and Oldman's performance makes an otherwise morally suspect film worth seeing. (According to Joe Wright's flag-waving version of WWII all common Londoners were eager to enter the war against the Nazis, and Churchill personally mined this insight on a single London Underground ride.)

But let me stress that these two are who I expect to win the Oscar, not who I think should win. The more I watch and write about movies the more I'm convinced that any awards for acting are meaningless unless the judges agree on a specific set of criteria. For example I loved Denzel's performance in Roman J. Israel, Esq. (which BTW is superior to Gilroy's previous effort Nightcrawler whose hip cynicism is designed to make you feel smug in your supposed moral superiority, but of course that's exactly why critics preferred the latter) and it is only the latest proof he's at worst one of the greatest actors alive today, but the film's lackluster box office has ensured that his work won't be as celebrated as that of his luckier colleagues. How is that a fair assessment of acting? Also is the portrayal of an eccentric, even when performed so flawlessly by a first-rate actor like Denzel, that much more laudable than the portrayal of a downtrodden but unremarkable member of society as by many actors in The Florida Project or even nonprofessional ones in the neorealist classics? The former task may be more "difficult" in the sense that it requires less a fine-tuning than a complete revamping of one's behavior, but is that necessarily "better"? Those are just some of the many questions that most arbiters of thespianism fail to answer.
 

NonP

Hall of Fame
Rewatched Boyhood (2014). Has to be in my top 5 favorite films. The longitudinal aspect really appeals to me. Some of the most beautiful scientific studies are set up that way, following a select cohort through the waves of life to pick out general life trends as well as the very individual and unique fates, and it's a concept that fits magnificently on the big screen as well (Michael Apted has notably done it in documentary form). In Boyhood we literally see this boy (both the character and the actor) grow up on the screen, from age 6 through 18, likewise with his sister, and we see his parents go from the cusp of entering their 30s into very different life situations in their 40s. Taking 12 years to shoot a film is worthy of reverence in itself, but this one manages to feel fresh and inspired throughout, instead of becoming a chore. I suppose it resonates particularly for me in that I guess I'm fairly close in age to the main character, so I watch him grow up through the same time periods I did, going to the same movies in childhood and so on. Doesn't feature one coherent dramaturgical plot line like most movies, but instead shows the continues stream of conflicts and small victories that is life itself. Great acting performances from all of the main cast as well.

What the hell is this "longitudinal aspect" of Boyhood? You know, you really don't need to use fancy words in an attempt to show you understand something. For real connoisseurs it's actually pretty easy to tell if one does or not.

And FYI even most favorable reviewers conceded that Ellar Coltrane's acting in the film wasn't quite up to par, which points to both the deficiency of its supposedly revelatory time-defying technique and the collectively deliberate amnesia of its supposed champions. If the aim of this tinkering with time is supposed to be heightened realism, then how real can it be when the very protagonist turns out to be the major disrupter of this reality? And there was something particularly disingenuous about the tiresome claim along the lines of "Linklater's time-bending masterpiece would've been impressive as a stand-alone film even without the extended footage," as if it were actually possible to conceive such a picture with different actors, crew and all that jazz. (And apparently the technical achievement of Boyhood was so groundbreaking but not so much as to be superseded by more conventional techniques.) All movies are artificial and it shouldn't matter if it took one or 12 years to make them as long as what remains on the screen meets one's standards of artistic quality.

For the record I do consider Linklater the best American filmmaker of his generation and the Before trilogy his most successful maneuvering of time (which unsurprisingly is helmed by two great lead actors, both of whom contributed to the script themselves), especially the first two titles which are among the finest love stories in cinema. It's hard and almost pointless to say which one is better but I tend to prefer Before Sunset, if only for its most exquisite ending (though that listening-booth scene makes its own strong case for Before Sunrise).

I know many liked Before Midnight as much but I personally found it disappointing. You can tell right off the bat trouble is ahead both for the couple and the movie when Céline virtually telegraphs its ending in the opening car sequence where she grouses about Jesse's desire to move back to the States for his son. It's as if Linklater had run out of his bag of tricks after he made the inspired choice to update McCarey's Love Affair/An Affair to Remember for the turn of the century and took it past its breaking point. His (and Hawke/Delpy's) Rohmeresque gabfests still manage to keep most of Midnight afloat, but they're not enough to save it because Linklater is at heart a dreamy baseball player whose cerebral imagination like Rohmer's limits his understanding of human behavior to his personal experience (as Linklater himself has divulged the whole Before trilogy began with a chance meeting he had with a woman in Philly in 1989). McCarey by contrast, as none other than Renoir would attest, and despite his own limitations as as filmmaker, understood people on a more instinctive level.

All that said we're lucky to have all of the Before series, and I hope Linklater follows up on his stated wish to continue and comes back with the latest update on Jesse and Céline in the next decade.

Watched Arrival (2016) and A Christmas Carol (2009) during the last 2 days. Arrival tried too hard to be clever. The film raised a couple of academic points about language. One of which is the theory that language, it's vocabulary and the ideas/constructs it is able to express, shape the way a person/species thinks and behaves. All the points might just be enough to write a synopsis for an introduction to the subject.
Arrival explored how our lack of communication and also our collective paranoia about "the others" could lead to a possible wipeout of our species - all hardly academic points. It attempted to do for our own perilous times what The Day the Earth Stood Still did for the Cold War era, and I'd say even better. I especially loved the ending which was unspeakably cruel and ineffably touching at the same time.

Believe there was a thread a while ago that asked whether Arrival or Interstellar was the better movie, which literally made me chuckle. If not for La La Land I'd probably rank Denis Villeneuve's ambitious feature the very best movie of 2016, while Nolan's technical vehicle is nothing more than a brainteaser for the Matrix crowd.

Speaking of whom....

Dunkirk - enjoyed it, even with the limited talking done in the film.
Dunkirk was probably the first serious movie Nolan ever made (no, the merely clever Memento doesn't count) and he deserves credit for his effort, but it still suffers from the same flag-waving as Darkest Hour (which also happened to cover the Dunkirk evacuation) and offers hardly any insight on the horrors or machineries of war. Plus I found it dramatically stale throughout.

Get Out (2017) - Interesting to start with but a slightly disappointing end. I am told it is doing well in the States.
I suppose there is a lot of stuff that is lost on non-American audiences.
My biggest beef with Get Out is its wavering between social protest and horror fest. It's like Peele wanted to have his cake and eat it too. Which I suppose is fine on paper, but I say using the tropes of a horror flick by definition makes light of whatever serious message you try to push.

That's why some critics have argued that Peele should've gone with this more pessimistic alternate (and apparently original - I've got the Blu-ray but have yet to open it) ending:


But that actually makes the lighter, more frivolous tone of the rest of the movie feel even more out of sync. And we're not even considering the validity of the very idea of a protest film/book/etc., which Baldwin critiqued in depth in his essay "Everybody's Protest Novel" with respect to Richard Wright's Native Son.

Apart from the dreamy ceiling scene it fails to display the sense of wonder that it so desperately wants to convey, and the timing of its release couldn't have been worse as its hero P. T. Barnum's legendary circus troupe happened to close its doors earlier in the same year (I actually attended one of the farewell productions and can personally assure you that this was most likely money following art or lack thereof, not the other way around), but yes, I agree the reviews have been unduly harsh. I just wish its mediocre score were a little stronger, in which case I would be more inclined to give a thumbs-up.
 

NonP

Hall of Fame
Downsizing. Very disturbing concept with a lot of dark humour. Matt Damon has an incredible resume of films.
I actually saw this just three days before The Post and it's frankly laughable if not at all surprising how reviewers have treated each film. Downsizing despite its obvious flaws is in many ways Payne's best feature while Spielberg's latest Oscar-ready vehicle is a hack job by a master craftsman who knows how and exactly whom to please.

That Spielberg's hero complex has always threatened to infantilize his work is no secret, but we're somehow expected to applaud the most recent realization of his worst urges because it happens to feature a mommy instead of a daddy at the center (the #MeToo movement couldn't have been timelier for this movie - no wonder Spielberg churned it out in a matter of months) and also because it pits the venerable fourth estate in its heroic battle against the all-powerful leviathan that is the Nixon White House, an unmistakable stand-in for you-know-what. Never mind that, if we must pinpoint a single figure in this movie, the real hero of the Watergate/Pentagon Papers saga is the redoubtable Daniel Ellsberg (who BTW has revealed his plans at the time to expose the dangers of nuclear war along with the Pentagon Papers), and that its real victims were the thousands of men and women who were sent off to die in Vietnam despite the government's knowledge that the war was unwinnable, not to mention the even greater numbers of Vietnamese soldiers and civilians who met their demise at the hands of foreign powers. No, let's focus our attention on the plight of poor Kay Graham, a millionaire heiress who was hobnobbing even during the supposedly tense episode with DC bigwigs including Robert McNamara, one of the main architects of the war, and to a lesser extent on Ben Bradlee who himself escaped the Post's battle with the Nixon administration relatively unscathed. Because girl power! (If you think I'm being too sarcastic, see how many professional critics have included Wonder Woman in their annual top 10. Apparently it counts as indisputable progress to finally have a superhero blockbuster for prepubescent girls rather than dozens for prepubescent boys.)

On the other hand much has been made of the Vietnamese activist in Downsizing that we are supposed to knock as an offensive stereotype against all Asians because she speaks in broken English. Well, I suggest these critics stop talking among themselves and start talking to laypeople, because the ones I've asked about Hong Chau's character (including an Asian man) all agreed she's the best thing about the movie. And I strongly suspect the real reason why Payne's latest feature hasn't been received with more enthusiasm is that it hit too close to home for the coastal bourgeois class that most of the critics belong to. What I like most about Downsizing is that it skewers not only the blind consumerism of our lifestyles but also the deep misanthropy that has been inherent in much of the environmental movement from its inception, and it is this refusal to spare us the latter which I reckon rubbed the liberal in-crowd the wrong way. And for a director whose liberal condescension used to rub me the wrong way this is a most welcome achievement. I'm not yet sure Downsizing belongs in my top 10 of 2017, but I might end up including it if only to provide a much-needed antidote to its unjustly lackluster reception.

Agree with everything here. Check out The Florida Project and Shape of Water.
I've already given a shout-out to The Florida Project but must say I didn't think too highly of The Shape of Water. Del Toro has revealed "this is the first time I speak as an adult," and if this is his first "grown-up" movie I hope he'll hop back to his childhood. I was immediately put off by the movie's opening sequence which shows the mute Elisa masturbating before work every morning (I truly hope men will one day realize that they can express female sexuality without acting out their male fantasies), and I will admit I was among the few audience members who chuckled at the waterborne consummation of Elisa and the Amphibian Man's love for each other, which feels particularly icky if one sees the monster as a stand-in for del Toro himself. (And as he showed in his heartfelt acceptance speech at the Globes last night, del Toro really worships his monsters.) Also I'm still not sure what we're to make of the film's Cold War setting or its supposed significance to the plot or our reactions to it, especially when it's so dominated by the strange love story and the classic Hollywood films it pays homage to date in fact from an earlier era. Compare this with his "kids' movies" Pan's Labyrinth and The Devil's Backbone (IMO his best work, probably because it lacks the former's violence which I found gratuitous in spots), both of which deal with their thorny politics with more understanding and intelligence. I admit this may be another failing on my part, but I know what I'd to see more from del Toro.
 

Sysyphus

Talk Tennis Guru
What the hell is this "longitudinal aspect" of Boyhood? You know, you really don't need to use fancy words in an attempt to show you understand something. For real connoisseurs it's actually pretty easy to tell if one does or not.
Am I really seeing someone implicitly refer to themselves as a "real connoisseur" and whine about someone using a slightly abstruse word, all in the span of a few sentences?:D

What a remarkably curious way to initiate a conversation. Forgive me if I didn't bother to read beyond.
 
D

Deleted member 733170

Guest
Hostiles, meditative is the word (if I was allowed only one) to describe this Western. Up there with one of the best in the genre, at least since the millenium.

Molly’s Game, worth watching because she’s hot and there is enough general pizazz and glamour to keep one involved. Though at times it feels a bit long winded and unless you are an American attorney, I suspect you will struggle to follow all the nuances.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Sentinel

Bionic Poster
Am I really seeing someone implicitly refer to themselves as a "real connoisseur" and whine about someone using a slightly abstruse word, all in the span of a few sentences?:D

What a remarkably curious way to initiate a conversation. Forgive me if I didn't bother to read beyond.
Just started Topper (1937) starring you and Constance Bennett.

I now have Cary Grant and you mixed up in my head :D
 
Three Billboards just won the Globe for Best Drama because in the current battleground over identity politics sexism is a bigger culpa non grata than racism. The movie will ultimately fade from memory as its shallow and confused treatment of its subject matter is gradually exposed.
I find Three Billboards hilarious. Surprised it was categorized as drama.

I disagree with your assessment to Timothee in Call Me By Your Name. I find his portrayal mesmerizing and what Elio supposed to be.

know Ronan just beat out Robbie for the Best Actress Globe but my bet is still on Oldman and Robbie for the respective Oscar. I've never completely warmed to Oldman's over-the-top scream-acting, but if there were ever a figure (historical or not) for whom such theatrics are not only appropriate but welcome it's Churchill, and Oldman's performance makes an otherwise morally suspect film worth seeing. (According to Joe Wright's flag-waving version of WWII all common Londoners were eager to enter the war against the Nazis, and Churchill personally mined this insight on a single London Underground ride.)
Ronan will win because she has been nominated 2 times for leading. I personally felt she should've win over Stone last year. Supporting at Golden Globe is full of surprise as both Dafoe and Metcalf lost. Same case for Oldman as obvious winner over Timothee.
 

NonP

Hall of Fame
Am I really seeing someone implicitly refer to themselves as a "real connoisseur" and whine about someone using a slightly abstruse word, all in the span of a few sentences?:D

What a remarkably curious way to initiate a conversation. Forgive me if I didn't bother to read beyond.
Heh, guess that came across as a tad too d!ckish. But the rest of my reply was more measured and serious. Feel free to respond any way you wish.

Molly’s Game, worth watching because she’s hot and there is enough general pizazz and glamour to keep one involved. Though at times it feels a bit long winded and unless you are an American attorney, I suspect you will struggle to follow all the nuances.
Jess was indeed quite the fox! The "Game" on the other hand was another matter, not because it's too hard to follow but because it's hard to see why we should care. Though this was a strong directorial debut by Sorkin he's still too enamored of his cleverness for his own good while his understanding of human nature is as bookish as ever. I suspect he'll keep at it until he gets his own Best Director Oscar, but that'll be at everyone else's expense.

I find Three Billboards hilarious. Surprised it was categorized as drama.

I disagree with your assessment to Timothee in Call Me By Your Name. I find his portrayal mesmerizing and what Elio supposed to be.
Again I realize I'm in the minority on this, but almost everything about CMBYN left me so cold I have no desire to revisit my misgivings anytime soon. Its uber-bourgeois setting certainly didn't help as I responded more viscerally to God's Own Country and especially BPM (Beats per Minute), one of my faves of 2017.

Ronan will win because she has been nominated 2 times for leading. I personally felt she should've win over Stone last year. Supporting at Golden Globe is full of surprise as both Dafoe and Metcalf lost. Same case for Oldman as obvious winner over Timothee.
You must be confusing Ronan with someone else as she wasn't nominated for anything last year. Also I don't think either Dafoe or Metcalf was a lock in their respective category. I believe the only shoo-in this year was Oldman, and I explained why I think he does deserve it despite my general reservations about him. I actually don't much care who wins the Globes/Oscars.

Besides neither Ronan or Robbie would be my pick for Best Actress anyway. If it were up to me my own noms would probably be like this (disregarding national boundaries, and in alphabetical order only):
  • Judith Chemla as Jeanne du Perthuis des Vauds in A Woman's Life
  • Eili Harboe as the eponymous heroine in Thelma
  • Aubrey Plaza as Ingrid Thorburn in Ingrid Goes West
  • Brooklynn Prince (yes, I understand she's only a 7-year-old) as Moonee in The Florida Project
  • Florence Pugh as Katherine Lester in Lady Macbeth
(Kidman might have wormed her way in had she been given a more prominent role in Sofia Coppola's recent remake of The Beguiled.)

Plaza was a real revelation in 2017. I used to take the glib view of her as the female Bill Murray but she's actually by some distance the more versatile actor: she's capable of tragedy while the most Murray can milk out of his character is poignancy. Deadpan comedy is still her forte, but I look forward to seeing her in more adventurous roles as long as she's willing.
 

maleyoyo

Professional
Manchester by the Sea. Putting its quality aside, I must wonder the entertainment value of this type of movies which has been a popular theme.
Why would anyone want to spend 2 hours of their time to feel miserable, depressed, and pain is beyond me.
 
Last edited:

sarmpas

Hall of Fame
Arrival explored how our lack of communication and also our collective paranoia about "the others" could lead to a possible wipeout of our species - all hardly academic points. It attempted to do for our own perilous times what The Day the Earth Stood Still did for the Cold War era, and I'd say even better. I especially loved the ending which was unspeakably cruel and ineffably touching at the same time.
This is additional to what I said.
 

Nostradamus

Bionic Poster
This Black Mirror thing isn't bad.... but not spectacular either. I thought that Bee hive thing was kind of fun then I still didn't get to see what happens to that bad guy at the end ???????????? Which season Is Best season ?
 

Doc Hollidae

Hall of Fame
Logan Lucky - Good, but not great. Was entertaining, but wouldn't consider it a top tier heist film.

Girl Trip - Absolutely hilarious. Was skeptical, but it warrants the high rating on Rotten Tomatoes based on the comedy. Pretty raunchy. Plot was fairly predictable.

Search Party - If you like the TV show Silicon Valley, you will like this movie. Very Hangover-esque. Liked the movie a lot.

Despicable Me 3 - Better than the Minions movie.

American Made - Based on a true story. Was entertaining, but nothing special. If you've watched Narcos, Barry Seal plays a small role, this just expands on his involvement with the Cartel.
 

Midaso240

Hall of Fame
OK, major housekeeping ahead.
Sorry but no way is Margot Robbie winning the Oscar. I loved her performance in that movie,but she's a longshot at best,with Ronan as competition as well as probably McDormand,Hawkins and Streep (who might I add I've never been a fan of but awards shows fawn over her like there's no tomorrow). Last watched The Shape Of Water and as I suspected it might,it bored me although I can appreciate certain aspects. Watched the Golden Globes,but those awards shows are becoming harder and harder to stomach as they become more of a platform for political statements than a celebration of film and TV. Most cringe worthy moment of the night: Natalie Portman commenting that all the directors nominated are male. Greta Gerwig maybe should have been in instead of Ridley Scott but otherwise would have been a bit of a stretch nominating any female directors.
 
Top