What was the last movie you watched?

NonP

Hall of Fame
Got no time even for capsule reviews, but here are several worthy titles you can catch on TCM sorted by expiring dates (yes, a whopping seven are leaving tonight!), along with alternate streaming options in parentheses:

2/20 - Casablanca (HBO Max), From Here to Eternity, Gigi, Love Affair (Amazon Prime, EPIX, The Film Detective, Pure Flix), Roman Holiday (Prime), Rope, Sweet Smell of Success
2/21 - The Age of Innocence dir. Scorsese, The Birds, It Happened One Night, The Philadelphia Story (HBO)
2/22 - City Lights (HBO, Criterion Channel), Grand Hotel dir. Edmund Goulding, Out of the Past, The Umbrellas of Cherbourg/Les Parapluies de Cherbourg (HBO, Criterion)
2/23 - What's Up, Doc?
2/25 - The Front Page dir. Milestone (Prime, HBO, Criterion, EPIX, The Film Detective), In This Our Life, Rear Window, Stars in My Crown, Vertigo, Written on the Wind
2/26 - The Band Wagon, Singin' in the Rain (HBO), West Side Story (Hulu)
2/27 - Magnificent Obsession
2/28 - The Lady Eve, Lord of the Flies dir. Brook (HBO, Criterion), Thelma & Louise, Wuthering Heights (Prime)
3/2 - Battleship Potemkin (Prime, HBO, Criterion, FlixFling), I Married a Witch (HBO, Criterion)
3/6 - Fantastic Planet (HBO, Criterion), Shadow of a Doubt
3/7 - Badlands (Criterion)
3/9 - To Be or Not to Be (HBO, Criterion), Wings of Desire/Der Himmel über Berlin (HBO, Criterion)
3/14 - Party Girl dir. Nicholas Ray, Silk Stockings
3/20 - Brigadoon

Actually a brief note before I go. When I was discussing Cukor's arguable rivals in "unbridled showmanship" I should have included Minnelli alongside Visconti, Zeffirelli and Luhrmann. In my defense I was thinking in terms of stand-alone spectacle without obtrusive musical accompaniment (hence my initial reluctance to acknowledge Baz) and none of Minnelli's best works I'd seen fit this description, but now that I've been exposed to his underappreciated Madame Bovary with its impeccably choreographed ball sequence I can say his omission was indeed unwarranted:


And no Minnelli film, not even An American in Paris, is as sumptuous a feast for the eyes as Gigi, where the sets and the locales vie with the costumes and the makeup to create a Belle Époque gallery of characters that can suspend their belief as well as ours:


Without that suspension of belief "Thank Heaven for Little Girls" would come across exactly as it sounds on paper, and though Leslie Caron was 26 with a son at the time her youthful appearance as well as her titular character's grooming to become a courtesan will likely leave a sour taste that is mitigated by the glorious pageantry.

You won't be surprised to know true love does prevail in the end - otherwise there's no chance this story of a courtesan in training gets past the censors in 1958 - but love is sly and fickle in this MGM extravaganza and finding out its next hapless victim is part of the musical's enduring charm. It could've been even better with a younger Maurice Chevalier as Gaston in lieu of Louis Jourdan (who, as fine as he is here, was even better cast in said adaptation of the Flaubert classic), but then we wouldn't have the debonair Frenchman's matchless rendition of the opening number, would we?
 

Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
It Happened One Night
Clark Gable and Undershirt Sales
Did Clark Gable precipitate a decline in undershirt sales in 1934?
David Mikkelson

Claim: Sales of men’s undershirts declined sharply after actor Clark Gable appeared bare-chested in the 1934 film It Happened One Night.

Origins: The tale about Clark Gable and the demise of the men’s undershirt industry is another example of how easily a piece of information can become an accepted “fact” whose validity is never questioned despite any real evidence that it is indeed true.

After Clark Gable removed his shirt to reveal a bare chest in a famous scene with Claudette Colbert in the 1934 film It Happened One Night, American men abandoned the wearing of undershirts in droves, so much so that undershirt sales declined by 75%, undergarment manufacturers were “devastated,” and the industry didn’t recover until the requirements of World War II uniforms got men back into the habit of wearing undershirts. How do we know this is true? Because for years, newspaper articles and television programs have been telling us it’s true. How do they know it’s true? They don’t ever tell us that — it’s simply assumed to be true because, well, it’s always been true.

First off, what documentation supports the claim that “sales of men’s undershirts dropped 75 percent” after It Happened One Night hit the theaters? We’d expect to see someone cite 1930s sales figures from undergarment manufacturers, offer statements made by garment industry executives of the era, reproduce some contemporary newspaper accounts, or even just quote an old-timer who could confirm “Yeah, we all stopped wearing T-shirts back around ’34 after we seen that there Clark Gable movie.” Nobody ever does, though.

Another factor to consider is that even if undershirt sales did drop dramatically after 1934, how would we know this decline was directly attributable to the image of a bare-chested Clark Gable? — that some other factor didn’t cause the sales slump, and the connection to It Happened One Night was merely a case of fallacious post hoc ergo propter hoc reasoning? (The year 1934 is often cited as the beginning of the “height of the Depression,” for example. Perhaps men didn’t really stop wearing undershirts then, but due to severe economic conditions they merely stopped buying new ones as often as they had before.)
In any case, how can we account for a single film’s having such a profound impact upon the ingrained dressing habits of American males? A 75% drop in sales would mean that a shirtless Clark Gable had to have influenced (directly or indirectly) far more than just the usual group of young urbanites who form the target audience typically receptive to fads. Young and old, city dwellers and country folk, rich and poor: All of them would had to have been just waiting for an excuse to shuck that second shirt in 1934, a huge percentage of American men tired of wearing T-shirts but unwilling to abandon them until a popular film star gave them “permission” to do so.

Proponents of the It Happened One Night claim make the mistake of equating new clothing fads with the shedding of existing patterns of dress. Sure, popular entertainments have long had an influence on fashion, but that influence generally affects only a small part of the population (i.e., the generations not yet old enough to be set in their ways) and involves the wearing of new styles of existing clothing (such as shorter skirts) or previously uncommon articles of apparel (such as capes or floppy hats), not the sudden casting off of long-worn functional articles of clothing. Women didn’t abandon brassieres after seeing Clark Gable romance a braless Jean Harlow in 1932’s Red Dust, and men didn’t stop wearing “outershirts” after Marlon Brando popularized the leather jacket and white T-shirt look in 1954’s The Wild One.

Perhaps rather than looking for a cause-and-effect relationship here, we should regard the decline in undershirt-wearing (if one did indeed occur) as yet another instance of a common phenomenon: Popular figures who reflect shifts in societal norms come to be seen as the causative agents who brought those shifts about, even though they were already well underway. Men had started to give up on wearing hats before John F.Kennedy supposedly appeared at his inauguration bareheaded (another legend in itself), but his prominence meant people later identified him as the focal point from which everyone else picked up the change. So maybe when Clark Gable appeared sans undershirt in It Happened One Night, he was following a trend, not starting one. Or just maybe there was no trend at all, and the whole story was concocted by a publicity agent as a ploy to bolster Gable’s appeal at contract renewal time.
Last updated: 10 May 2014
https://www.snopes.com/fact-check/the-shirt-off-his-back/
 

Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
3/7 - Badlands (Criterion)
I recently watched Badlands and really enjoyed it, though it is as bleak as Springsteen's Nebraska and far from a 'feel good' film. The sensual. painterly depiction of rural South Dakota really drew me into the film, almost triggering olfactory sensations. True Romance borrowed much from the film, including a young woman narrator and theme music.

"Gassenhauer" Neusiedler/Orff/Mai

Carl Orff - Gassenhauer

Badlands - Soundtrack "Gassenhauer" (1973) Carl Orff


You're So Cool - Hans Zimmer (True Romance, 1993)
 
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gn

G.O.A.T.
Rebecca (2020): A young newlywed arrives at her husband's imposing family estate on a windswept English coast and finds herself battling the shadow of his first wife, Rebecca, whose legacy lives on in the house long after her death.
Starring: Lily James, Armie Hammer
Creepy movie. Liked it.
 

Ronaldo

Bionic Poster
Rebecca (2020): A young newlywed arrives at her husband's imposing family estate on a windswept English coast and finds herself battling the shadow of his first wife, Rebecca, whose legacy lives on in the house long after her death.
Starring: Lily James, Armie Hammer
Creepy movie. Liked it.
Remake of the 1940 Hitchcock film?
 

Poisoned Slice

Bionic Poster
I watched The Irishman again. 2 sessions to get through it all. I really enjoy Joe Pesci's performance here. Maybe I appreciate it more because I haven't seen a new performance in such a long time. Al Pacino is shouting a lot.
 

Vcore89

G.O.A.T.
I watched The Irishman again. 2 sessions to get through it all. I really enjoy Joe Pesci's performance here. Maybe I appreciate it more because I haven't seen a new performance in such a long time. Al Pacino is shouting a lot.
The restaurant shooting is de rigueur.

The fish scene however, is unapologetically silly, it's hilarious!;)

''It's wet.''
''Yeah, I had a fish I had a frozen fish I had to deliver for a friend of mine.''''
''A fish, the seat is wet from a fish?''
. . .
''What kind of fish?''
''I don't know. The kind you eat. A fish.''
. . .
''Where did you get it?''
''What the e-f-f. At a fish place.''
 
Marty (1955) is a very enjoyable movie. Ernest Borgnine won the best actor, and the film got the best picture that year. It's about regular guys like the rest of us who get brushed off by girls :), "dogs" as they are called in the movie. It's brutally honest about how we judge people by their looks, everyone is calling the girl "a dog", even Marty's mother says she isn't good looking.

EB was there in From Here to Eternity too as the sadistic sergeant who beats up Frank Sinatra.
It is a very enjoyable film, though with some really sad spots interspersed. I saw it again just the other night. I like the ending too, where you are left not knowing what will happen but hopeful Marty will have his happily ever after.
 

Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
"The Exterminating Angel" is considered a great film by many critics and filmmakers, and I wasn't disappointed.


The Exterminating Angel
Roger Ebert May 11, 1997

Luis Bunuel's "The Exterminating Angel" (1962) is a macabre comedy, a mordant view of human nature that suggests we harbor savage instincts and unspeakable secrets. Take a group of prosperous dinner guests and pen them up long enough, he suggests, and they'll turn on one another like rats in an overpopulation study.

By the time he came to make "The Exterminating Angel" in 1962, Bunuel's career was on its delayed upswing. He had made a great international hit, "Viridiana," in 1960; it won many festival prizes and represented his return to Spain after decades overseas. But its central image--a scandalous tableau re-creating the Last Supper--displeased the Spanish censors, and he was back in Mexico again and primed for bitter satire when he made "The Exterminating Angel."

Obviously, the dinner guests represent the ruling class in Franco's Spain. Having set a banquet table for themselves by defeating the workers in the Spanish Civil War, they sit down for a feast, only to find it never ends. They're trapped in their own bourgeois cul-de-sac. Increasingly resentful at being shut off from the world outside, they grow mean and restless; their worst tendencies are revealed.

Of course, Bunuel never made his political symbolism that blatant. "The Exterminating Angel" plays as a deadpan comedy about the unusual adventures of his dinner guests.
https://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/great-movie-the-exterminating-angel-1962
 
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Sentinel

Bionic Poster

Fascinating movie. Just found out it was a documentary. Had a tear in my eye at the end.

Yeah, I think so. Got negative reviews from critics and audience. But I never watched the old one. So the reviews didn't bother me from enjoying the new one.
You've got to watch the original Rebecca, bro.
 

acintya

Legend
its not a movie,but lately im in love with Nothern Exposures - the old tv show :) . I would like to live there in that time - im sick of technology lately and how far into the digital world we pushed. its the "cold" age.

if you want to feel some warmth spin this series. releases shortly after Twin Peaks i think.
 

Jake Speeed

Professional
I just watched "The Brake."

I had this movie years ago possibly on VHS. I just purchased a DVD on the bay foe 10 bucks delivered.

Brought back memories.

J
 

Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
"Argo" (2012)

Political thriller with comic twists, fine cast, well done
Tony Mendez and his wife Jonna, who also worked for CIA, both wrote entertaining books about their careers.



Nitrophenyl pentadienal, nitrophenylpentadienal, NPPD, or METKA (Russian for "mark") colloquially known as "spy dust",[1] is a chemical compound used as a tagging agent by the KGB during the Cold War Soviet Era. Soviet authorities in Moscow tracked Americans by applying an almost invisible powder to their clothing, cars, doorknobs and other objects. Some other variants of "spy dust" may have contained luminol and would glow under ultraviolet light
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nitrophenyl_pentadienal

Should you need a disguise:

Meet the CIA’s disguise artists who helped Cold War spies disappear
Aug 20, 2019

Former CIA Operative Explains How Spies Use Disguises | WIRED
 

Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
"Long Day’s Journey into Night"
Directed by Bi Gan

I really enjoyed this hypnotic, dream-like film from China. Beautiful, lush cinematography and some aspects reminded me of Tarkovsky and Lynch. Director Bi Gan also pulled off an hour-long 3-D tracking shot that begins in the middle of the film. Not a film for people with the need for clicking, checking social media for likes, quick editing, and the next image. Long and slow, but I never exited the cinematic spell.

Long Day's Journey Into Night – Official Trailer
 

Sysyphus

Talk Tennis Guru
"Long Day’s Journey into Night"
Directed by Bi Gan

I really enjoyed this hypnotic, dream-like film from China. Beautiful, lush cinematography and some aspects reminded me of Tarkovsky and Lynch. Director Bi Gan also pulled off an hour-long 3-D tracking shot that begins in the middle of the film. Not a film for people with the need for clicking, checking social media for likes, quick editing, and the next image. Long and slow, but I never exited the cinematic spell.

Long Day's Journey Into Night – Official Trailer
Been wanting to see this, but not been able to find it around my neck of the woods.
 

NonP

Hall of Fame
Been meaning to catch up on GG nominees before the ceremony (in less than 2 hrs), but I knew that was a long shot as today happens to be the last day of the month when the streaming services brandish their deletion ax. So I'll just leave y'all for now with this rough ranking (in preference) of those nominees I've seen, somewhat revised/expanded from the one I shared with Moose in a PM Thursday:
  • News of the World - Hanks seems to get better with age, and Helena Zengel is the best child actor I've seen since Brooklynn Prince and Jacob Tremblay.
  • Judas and the Black Messiah - I've never been a big fan of Kaluuya's, but his powerhouse performance as Fred Hampton deserves all the kudos it gets.
  • The Trial of the Chicago 7 - Though Sorkin is as bookish as ever this is a big improvement over Molly's Game. And I liked Baren Cohen a lot more here than in his new Borat outing (see below).
  • The Mauritanian - The movie is typical fare from Kevin Macdonald - solid prose, but far too limited by "true events" to approach a revelatory book - and the late Chadwick Boseman is probably a shoo-in for the dramatic acting Globe and the Best Actor Oscar. But Tahar Rahim (a name new to me) is excellent as Guantanamo detainee Mohamedou Ould Salahi and I hope he pulls off an upset at least this one nite.
  • The Personal History of David Copperfield - Literary adaptations don't come more middle-of-the-road than this, but then I'm a sucker for costume dramas.
  • Borat Subsequent Moviefilm - About as revealing and self-congratulating as the New Yorker caricature of the Obamas, but Maria Bakalova's star turn and of course her fateful encounter with Giuliani almost make it worthwhile.
  • The Croods: A New Age - Lovely animation, and its class conflict and semi-screwball comedy rescue it from family-fare doldrums.
  • Music - The Green Book/Joker of 2020-2021 in the inordinate amount of flack it has caught so far. I grant that it's a series of music videos interrupted by what strains to be an awareness-raising story, not the other way around, and there's no unheralded "Chandelier" or even "Cheap Thrills" here, but I applaud Sia's new venture into filmmaking and judging by the literal applause that broke out at the end of the limited screening I attended on 2/10 the harsh verdict on the film's supposedly dehumanizing attitude towards autistic people isn't widely shared among its audience.
  • Emma. - It's a slog compared to Clueless or even the McGrath version, but what costumes!
  • Tenet - Aa return to form of sorts for Nolan, if soulless brainteasers are your thing.
  • Promising Young Woman - I hated this debut feature from Emerald Fennell, a sort of pussified Tarantino in its gleeful lust for revenge. But then it all made sense when I noticed that she was also the showrunner for season two of the equally bloodthirsty BBC series Killing Eve, which has been treated with similar kid gloves thanks to its all-female leading characters.
  • Onward - I really don't remember much of this at all, which likely means it's among the weakest Pixar releases to date.
Suffice it to say that none of the above are expected to be serious contenders for Best Picture, and they don't deserve to be even in this depleted awards season. I'll probably report back after I've checked out the remaining ones, but I really haven't been keeping up with recent releases so don't expect a comprehensive overview from moi as in bygone (read: pre-COVID) years.

Also got a few more worthy expiring titles on TCM to supplement this list from a week ago:

2/28 - The Lady Eve, Lord of the Flies dir. Brook (HBO, Criterion), Thelma & Louise, Wuthering Heights (Prime)
3/2 - Battleship Potemkin (Prime, HBO, Criterion, FlixFling), I Married a Witch (HBO, Criterion)
3/6 - Fantastic Planet (HBO, Criterion), Shadow of a Doubt
3/7 - Badlands (Criterion)
3/9 - To Be or Not to Be (HBO, Criterion), Wings of Desire/Der Himmel über Berlin (HBO, Criterion)
3/14 - Party Girl dir. Nicholas Ray, Silk Stockings
3/20 - Brigadoon
As usual I'm listing alternate streaming options in parentheses. Here goes:

2/28 - Born Yesterday, The Remains of the Day
3/1 - My Fair Lady
3/2 - Victim (HBO Max, Criterion Channel)
3/4 - Carnival of Souls (Amazon Prime, HBO, Criterion, EPIX, Screambox), I Walked with a Zombie
3/5 - Ninotchka
3/7 - The Awful Truth, Design for Living, Trouble in Paradise (FlixFling)
3/12 - The Manchurian Candidate (Criterion)
3/13 - 12 Angry Men
3/24 - East of Eden (HBO), Rocco and His Brothers/Rocco e i suoi fratelli (Criterion)
3/25 - Death in Venice/Morte a Venezia (a shout-out to Victim and Bogarde in that old review of mine)
3/26 - The Exterminating Angel/El ángel exterminador (Criterion)
3/27 - Juliet of the Spirits/Giulietta degli spiriti (HBO, Criterion), Yolanda and the Thief

And now some light housekeeping:

Clark Gable and Undershirt Sales
Did Clark Gable precipitate a decline in undershirt sales in 1934?
David Mikkelson

Claim: Sales of men’s undershirts declined sharply after actor Clark Gable appeared bare-chested in the 1934 film It Happened One Night.

Origins: The tale about Clark Gable and the demise of the men’s undershirt industry is another example of how easily a piece of information can become an accepted “fact” whose validity is never questioned despite any real evidence that it is indeed true.
LOL I actually read that take Snopes takedown after watching It Happened One Night me-self. Gable does look like a Greek sculpture in that beloved Capra comedy - the jury is still somewhat out as to whether it qualifies as screwball - but it was always something of a stretch to blame his imposing pulchritude for the decline of undershirt sales.


-over hipped imo
-not crap!!, but not as good as i though it would be ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
A rather dour superhero flick which probably explains its lackluster box office (after adjusting for the pandemic, if such a thing can be done or even makes sense) better than whatever SWJ message it allegedly pushes onto the audience. The spectacular opening sequence - apparently it and an ending scene were the only parts that were shot in genuine 1.90:1 IMAX ratio - boded well for the rest of the movie, but no cigar. Don't think it's possible to see it in IMAX anymore but I'd advise every holdout to wait till it returns to HBO Max (or other platforms).

"The Exterminating Angel" is considered a great film by many critics and filmmakers, and I wasn't disappointed.

I revisited several of Buñuel's major works after seeing Los olivados/The Young and the Damned for the 1st time last year, which convinced me he's easily among the 10-12 greatest filmmakers ever. And yes, The Exterminating Angel is one of 'em though I'd probably name Viridiana as his best from his (later) Mexican period. All of these three are essentials, of course.

"Long Day’s Journey into Night"
Directed by Bi Gan

I really enjoyed this hypnotic, dream-like film from China. Beautiful, lush cinematography and some aspects reminded me of Tarkovsky and Lynch. Director Bi Gan also pulled off an hour-long 3-D tracking shot that begins in the middle of the film. Not a film for people with the need for clicking, checking social media for likes, quick editing, and the next image. Long and slow, but I never exited the cinematic spell.

Long Day's Journey Into Night – Official Trailer
Can't second your thumbs-up here, and frankly comparing it to Tarkovsky and Lynch is an insult to both. At the very least I can say you didn't miss much by watching it at home in 2D.

A better use of your time would be the late Hu Bo's only feature An Elephant Sitting Still which is now playing on Prime. Almost twice as long, but far more gripping and rewarding:

 

Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
I watched three Agnès Varda films, two shorts and one feature. The first two didn't do much for me.



"Lions Love (and Lies...)" is rooted in experimental theater and late sixties politics. It kept my interest, helped by the verité filming in familiar L.A. areas circa 1968.


More than a time capsule of events and moods-it's a living aesthetic model for revolutionary times.
May 29, 2017 | Full Review…
Richard Brody
New Yorker
Jim Morrison can be seen in the audience of the opening theater scene. He is just a guy in the audience. Agnès Varda has an interesting connection with Morrison and "Last Tango in Paris."



Jim Morrison resumed an acquaintanceship with Jacques Demy and his wife Agnes Varda, leading lights in the cinematic French New Wave.

“We had a common friend in Alain Ronay,” says Varda, who has seldom spoken in depth about Jim until now. “We saw The Doors in Los Angeles in 1967 when Jacques was filming The Model Shop,” recalls Varda from her Parisian home. “In 1970 he’d visited the set for my film Lions Love – he appears briefly.”

Alain Ronay was a student at the UCLA Film School in 1964; the older man was a post-graduate. Jim also turned up on set with Ronay for Demy’s film Peau D’Ane (Donkey Skin). During that initial visit to Paris, Morrison went to a birthday party for Varda’s 10-year-old daughter Rosalie.

“I think he liked us because we never asked him for anything,” says Agnes. “He was drunk that afternoon; drunk but happy. He drank a lot of brandy. Other times I saw him in my courtyard. He used to visit us and eat. He sat in my yard for many hours. Didn’t talk much. Didn’t like to gossip. I never even took his photograph. His wish in Paris was to write poems.

Having spent most of five weeks living with Jim Morrison, Alain Ronay moved out of the apartment and into a room at Agnes Varda’s house on Rue Daguerre, where the filmmaker was working on dialogue for the script of Last Tango In Paris with director Bernardo Bertolucci. The film, starring Marlon Brando, released in 1972, about an American exiled – and dying – in Paris was, some said later, influenced by the Morrison story.


Paris, 1970, on the set of the film 'Donkey Skin', footage taken by Agnes Varda

On the morning of Friday, July 2 Morrison and Ronay walked in the Marais. Morrison bought Pamela jewellery. They ate at Ma Bourgogne, a restaurant specialising in the rich food of Alsace, where Morrison’s hiccoughing fits returned. Jim called at the cobblers to collect some boots. Despite Ronay’s insistence that Jim was not despondent he was agitated. After beers at Café de Phare, Ronay left for a dinner date with Varda. Morrison begged him to stay: “One more short beer! C’mon. Do it for an old friend”. Ronay agreed. Morrison’s hiccoughs were raging now. Ronay looked at Jim alive for the last time in the Place de la Bastille. He saw a face like a death mask. Sensing his stare, Morrison asked: “Well – what did you see?”.

At Varda’s house, Ronay recounted his unsettling afternoon. They went for dinner around the time Jim and Pam supposedly went to eat a Chinese meal. Ronay had recommended the couple go to see the film Pursued, a Freudian Western set in New Mexico, starring Robert Mitchum, about a young boy whose family is wiped out. What happened in the hours between Ronay’s departure that late afternoon, and the eventual death of Jim Morrison now becomes a mystery.

“We buried Jim on Wednesday 7,” he says. “It was morning. His body was picked up at the apartment. I travelled with Pamela and the secretary Robin Wertle to the cemetery. Ronay and Varda followed separately…”
https://www.loudersound.com/features/l-a-woman-and-the-last-days-of-jim-morrison
 

Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
"Morvern Callar"

It's based on a novel by Scottish writer Alan Warner. Warner is a good writer, and I read the novel years ago. I enjoyed the film.

 

Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
"Code Unknown" (2000)

Not very entertaining or gripping, but an excellent film that I'm glad I watched.


Agnès Varda's "Cleo from 5 to 7." Enjoyed watching this classic French New Wave film.


"Ceiling"


This is a short (42 min.) student film by Czech director Věra Chytilová. "Daisies" is her most famous film, which was made during the "Pargue Spring" period of artistic freedom before the Soviet clampdown in 1968. "The Ceiling" was filmed in the style of cinéma vérité, so there are many street and public venue scenes where you glimpse life in a bleak looking 1962 communist Prague.

 
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Harry_Wild

G.O.A.T.

“Never take your mistress on an annual guys' getaway, especially one devoted to hunting - a violent lesson for three wealthy married men.”

Storyline:
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Revenge_(2017_film)

Revenge is a 2017 French rape and revenge action thriller film written and directed by Coralie Fargeat, and starring Matilda Lutz, Kevin Janssens, Vincent Colombe and Guillaume Bouchède. The plot follows a young woman who is assaulted and left for dead in the desert by three men, where she recovers and seeks vengeance upon her attackers.

It is literal an adrenaline rush with chases, action, suspense, shootouts, revenge, twists. The female turns out to be an expert hunter unknown to the men who take advantage of her and she takes revenge on them. The plot, gun knowledge and directing is very subpar but in this movie, it makes the movie even more amazing.

I am going to watch this again! It so amazing! Maybe buy it too!
 
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Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.

“Never take your mistress on an annual guys' getaway, especially one devoted to hunting - a violent lesson for three wealthy married men.”

Storyline:
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Revenge_(2017_film)

Revenge is a 2017 French rape and revenge action thriller film written and directed by Coralie Fargeat, and starring Matilda Lutz, Kevin Janssens, Vincent Colombe and Guillaume Bouchède. The plot follows a young woman who is assaulted and left for dead in the desert by three men, where she recovers and seeks vengeance upon her attackers.

It is literal an adrenaline rush with chases, action, suspense, shootouts, revenge, twists. The female turns out to be an expert hunter unknown to the men who take advantage of her and she takes revenge on them. The plot, gun knowledge and directing is very subpar but in this movie, it makes the movie even more amazing.

I am going to watch this again! It so amazing! Maybe buy it too!
I would have guessed this was better received by audiences than critics, but it's very much the reverse.

 

Jake Speeed

Professional

“Never take your mistress on an annual guys' getaway, especially one devoted to hunting - a violent lesson for three wealthy married men.”

Storyline:
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Revenge_(2017_film)

Revenge is a 2017 French rape and revenge action thriller film written and directed by Coralie Fargeat, and starring Matilda Lutz, Kevin Janssens, Vincent Colombe and Guillaume Bouchède. The plot follows a young woman who is assaulted and left for dead in the desert by three men, where she recovers and seeks vengeance upon her attackers.

It is literal an adrenaline rush with chases, action, suspense, shootouts, revenge, twists. The female turns out to be an expert hunter unknown to the men who take advantage of her and she takes revenge on them. The plot, gun knowledge and directing is very subpar but in this movie, it makes the movie even more amazing.

I am going to watch this again! It so amazing! Maybe buy it too!
I just looked. Where is it?
 

ollinger

G.O.A.T.
"Hi Fidelity" (2000)

Warm and comfortable as your favorite sweater, a charming film about relationships that thankfully doesn't overstate their significance. No large points here but plenty of smaller and very real ones.
 

stringertom

Bionic Poster
Becky...felt kinda weird to see Kevin James as an evil skinhead bad guy. Way too much gratuitous violence overdone with blood gushing everywhere during several killing scenes. The young heroine Becky was played by Lulu Wilson and she did a good job. She might have a decent future (age 15 IIRC).

Stringertom Tom Thumb(y)(y).
 

Ronaldo

Bionic Poster
Becky...felt kinda weird to see Kevin James as an evil skinhead bad guy. Way too much gratuitous violence overdone with blood gushing everywhere during several killing scenes. The young heroine Becky was played by Lulu Wilson and she did a good job. She might have a decent future (age 15 IIRC).

Stringertom Tom Thumb(y)(y).
Sequel: Karen?
 
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