What was the last movie you watched?

Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
"Hi Fidelity" (2000)

Warm and comfortable as your favorite sweater, a charming film about relationships that thankfully doesn't overstate their significance. No large points here but plenty of smaller and very real ones.
I really like that film and the Nick Hornby novel. It's the first film that comes to mind when I think of Jack Black. Please note that I am not often thinking about Jack Black in my erotic fantasies. Danish actress Iben Hjejle was really good in that film.
 

ollinger

G.O.A.T.
I really like that film and the Nick Hornby novel. It's the first film that comes to mind when I think of Jack Black. Please note that I am not often thinking about Jack Black in my erotic fantasies. Danish actress Iben Hjejle was really good in that film.
Hjejle may be in MY fantasies for a while, such a cute girlish sexiness in that film. May have been Jack Black's first substantial role and he made a big impression in it.
 

Poisoned Slice

Bionic Poster
The art of self-defense. @Vcore89

I was reminded of Cobra Kai here. Shades of Tory with Anna. There was a beating she hands out that is very similar to the beating Hawk gave the big lad. The sensei was even more extreme than Kreese. :eek: I kept asking myself, who is this sensei? You know, I felt like I've seen him before. Then I do the search and find out he is Pollux Troy. Wowzers.

It was a pretty enjoyable movie.
 

Sentinel

Bionic Poster
Nice simple movie about a girl looking after her father. A small romance complicates matters.
 

stringertom

Bionic Poster
I now have seen the least impressive film in Marty Scorsese’s career when I was doing some late night channel surfing and tuned into Showtime just as the credits for The Last Temptation Of Christ began rolling. It was pure effort to make it through the entire film to see its very dismal closing sequence.

Stringertom Thumb(n)(n) (a rating shared by wooden David Bowie as Pilate)
 

Sentinel

Bionic Poster
I now have seen the least impressive film in Marty Scorsese’s career when I was doing some late night channel surfing and tuned into Showtime just as the credits for The Last Temptation Of Christ began rolling. It was pure effort to make it through the entire film to see its very dismal closing sequence.

Stringertom Thumb(n)(n) (a rating shared by wooden David Bowie as Pilate)
I have watched two movies. This one and The Passion. One of them I did not care for at all. I was choking through the other one and had to control myself since I was with my cousins. I think this one showed Him being dragged with the cross.
 

stringertom

Bionic Poster
I have watched two movies. This one and The Passion. One of them I did not care for at all. I was choking through the other one and had to control myself since I was with my cousins. I think this one showed Him being dragged with the cross.
Early in the Scorsese film it shows Jesus as a young carpenter being forced to convey the perpendicular cross section he has honed but it’s not to his own crucifixion. He is cursed by the Nazareth crowd along his path as a Roman collaborator. Later, he does the same procession as the convicted and sentenced seditionist. Both times it’s just the horizontal section that is then wedged into the top of the post at the execution site, the second time being Calvary Hill in Jerusalem.
 

Vcore89

G.O.A.T.
The art of self-defense. @Vcore89

I was reminded of Cobra Kai here. Shades of Tory with Anna. There was a beating she hands out that is very similar to the beating Hawk gave the big lad. The sensei was even more extreme than Kreese. :eek: I kept asking myself, who is this sensei? You know, I felt like I've seen him before. Then I do the search and find out he is Pollux Troy. Wowzers.

It was a pretty enjoyable movie.
Anna: Now get in line yellow belt [though you killed Sensei with the only move grand master ever knew--the one-finger punch through the skull].;)
 

Poisoned Slice

Bionic Poster
Anna: Now get in line yellow belt [though you killed Sensei with the only move grand master ever knew--the one-finger punch through the skull].;)
I've been listening to a lot more heavy metal lately. Sensei says it is the only thing I should listen to. However, he did say that there is much you can learn by watching trance dancers movements in the clubs.
 

stringertom

Bionic Poster
The Go-Go’s documentary on Showtime is well worth a watch. No holds barred with present era interviews of all the band members and managers...rivalries, betrayals and drug abuse exposed. It’s uplifting to see the hatchets have been buried well enough to allow a recent reunion. They are still the only all-female band to write their own material and reach #1 chart rankings. They also have not yet been inducted into the R&R HOF, a total travesty.

Stringertom Thumb (y) (y) (y) Approved
 

Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
The Go-Go’s documentary on Showtime is well worth a watch. No holds barred with present era interviews of all the band members and managers...rivalries, betrayals and drug abuse exposed. It’s uplifting to see the hatchets have been buried well enough to allow a recent reunion. They are still the only all-female band to write their own material and reach #1 chart rankings. They also have not yet been inducted into the R&R HOF, a total travesty.

Stringertom Thumb (y) (y) (y) Approved
I just saw a clip of the Go-Go's from 1980 at the Whisky during its punk era.

 

SystemicAnomaly

Talk Tennis Guru
Just got around to Bombshell (2019). Noticed it was playing free of charge on Prime Video so I've started watching it. Quite impressed with it thus far. Outstanding performances from Theron, Lithgow, Robbie, Kidman and others.

I’ll be honest - the name Bombshell doesn’t appeal me to actually watch the movie. I’ll probably put it off because of it.
Seems like a rather weak = lame reason for avoiding a film.
 

tennytive

Professional
Blood and Money
Tom Beringer in the lead. He gives a convincing performance in a well written story that could have been taken from real life. Liked it a lot.
One interesting tidbit, for me anyway, is in the extras he says he played an hour and a half of pickleball every day for 5 weeks as part of his training for the movie which takes place in
the Maine wilderness and for the most part has him trudging through the cold winter woods in deep snow.
 

Backspin1183

G.O.A.T.
Zack Snyder's Justice League!

It's everything the fans wanted. The best movie from the DCEU and a fitting final movie for Snyder and Ben Affleck, assuming there won't be sequels.
 
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Sentinel

Bionic Poster
Have managed to catch some rather intereting movies of late.

Heidi (1937) with Shirley Temple.
So B It (2016) - about a girl with an autistic mother and an agoraphobic caretaker.
Foxfire (1987) with Jessica Tandy and Hume Cronym.
From Time to Time (2009). A boy goes back in time and solves a mystery.
Wuthering Heights (1992) with Ralph Fiennes.
 
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Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
"Seberg"


”Seberg” is based on the true story of how politically motivated FBI harassment led to Jean Seberg’s psychological destruction. It’s a tragic story that was loaded with possibilities. Unfortunately, the film is dull, emotionally flat and entirely uninspiring. The by-the-numbers screenplay even centered on an entirely fictitious sympathetic FBI agent, and Kristen Stewart basically sleepwalked to her paycheck.



How Hollywood star Jean Seberg was destroyed by the FBI
As a biopic about the troubled actor arrives in UK cinemas, Geoffrey Macnab looks back at one of the strangest and most contradictory film careers of the postwar years
Wednesday 08 January 2020

Seberg, out in UK cinemas this Friday, isn’t a straight biopic. Its focus is its subject’s deadly entanglement with the FBI. Days after her suicide, the FBI admitted that its agents had plotted to ruin her reputation as part of their counter-intelligence programme, Cointelpro, authorised by FBI founder, J Edgar Hoover himself. Seberg’s crime, in Hoover’s eyes, was her involvement in political causes and her support of the Black Panther Party. In particular, they were suspicious of her close links with Black Power leader, Hakim Jamal (played in the film by Anthony Mackie).

In 1970, the FBI planted the false rumour that Seberg was pregnant by a Black Panther Party member in order to “cause her embarrassment” and “cheapen her image” with the American public. Their plan worked. It was dispiriting but inevitable that some gossip columnists followed the false leads that the FBI dangled in front of them. From the FBI’s point of view, she was involved in radical politics, had contributed financially to the Black Panthers and was therefore fair game. The story was picked up by gossip columnist, Joyce Haber, who referred obliquely to it in the Los Angeles Times. Newsweek also wrote about it and named Seberg.

“Under the ruthless gaze of the FBI, the threads of Jean’s life come apart,” Benedict Andrews, the director of Seberg, pointed out. The assault on her reputation set in motion the events that led to her death a decade later. At the time of the leak, Seberg had indeed been pregnant. In the wake of reading the false stories about herself, she went into labour. Her baby was born prematurely and died a few days later.

The woman Hoover set out to crush was the quintessential young American, “the golden sunflower girl” from the *******, as she was characterised. A pharmacist’s daughter who had grown up in Marshalltown, Iowa, she had won Hollywood’s version of the Lottery by landing the lead role in Otto Preminger’s George Bernard Shaw adaptation, Saint Joan (1957). The autocratic Preminger had launched a nationwide talent hunt for a new Joan of Arc. A reported 18,000 girls had sent in pictures and resumes and 3,000 had been given personal auditions. Seberg got the part. She was the one, as TV show host Ed Sullivan put it, who had “caught lightning in a bottle”. It was the equivalent of Vivien Leigh being cast as Scarlett O’Hara in Gone With the Wind (1939).

By her own admission, Seberg wasn’t obvious casting. She talked about being burnt at the stake twice, first in making the movie and then by the critics. Preminger cast her in a second film, Bonjour Tristesse (1958) but then discarded her. “He used me like a Kleenex and then threw me away”, is how she described her treatment at his hands.

Seberg really was a special talent. She had a spontaneity, mischief and lambent grace on screen that immediately enraptured the young critics and would-be filmmakers from Cahiers du Cinéma in France. “When Jean Seberg is on the screen, which is all the time, you can’t look at anything else,” Francois Truffaut enthused about her performance in Bonjour Tristesse. Godard and Claude Chabrol were equally smitten with her.

In one of the more bizarre transformations in Hollywood history, the midwestern girl-next-door type became the sacred muse of the French Nouvelle Vague.

Thanks to Breathless, Seberg also became more highly valued back in Hollywood. Director Robert Rossen, who cast her in one of her greatest roles as the beautiful schizophrenic opposite Warren Beatty and Peter Fonda in Lillith(1964) spoke of her “flawed American girl quality, sort of like a cheerleader who’s cracked up”. She had prominent roles in all-star blockbusters like Airport (1970) and successfully held her own against such scene-stealers as Lee Marvin and Clint Eastwood in Paint Your Wagon (1969).

That, though, was the period before Hoover and the FBI set about destroying her just as surely as Otto Preminger had tried to create her as a star in the late Fifties in the first place.

Preminger and Hoover bookend her career. The media colluded with those two patriarchs, building her up and then knocking her down.

Elements of Seberg’s story are utterly heartbreaking. As Alistair Cooke told British listeners in one of his Letters from America broadcasts the week after her death, she took her prematurely born baby’s corpse back home to Iowa “in a glass coffin as a glaring proof that the baby was white – an excessive reaction perhaps but in 1970, she knew that the FBI could and did destroy hundreds of radicals and non radicals”.

On each anniversary of the baby’s death, her then-husband Romain Gary later revealed, she had attempted suicide.

If Seberg was feeling marginalised and paranoid in her final years, you could hardly blame her given the FBI harassment, the upheaval in her private life and the alarming way her career had begun to creak. As her biographer David Richards notes, she was putting on weight, drinking too much and seemed to be in a state of permanent “psychological siege”. By the late 1970s, she was close to being forgotten. Her death, though, put her right back on the front pages. The public was reminded of just how abominably she had been treated both by Hollywood and by the FBI. There was a sense of frustration over talent that had never been properly fulfilled.
https://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/films/features/kristen-stewart-new-movie-jean-seberg-suicide-fbi-venice-film-festival-2019-a9080366.html
 

Sentinel

Bionic Poster

The Last Vermeer (2019) - Guy Pearce as Han van Meegeren.

Based on the book, The Man who made Vermeers.

Interesting movie.
 

NonP

Hall of Fame
Been a while. Let's start with worthy titles leaving TCM within the next month, as always sorted by the last date to watch with alternate streaming services in parentheses:

3/26 - Breakfast at Tiffany's (Amazon Prime), Swing Time
3/27 - Anatomy of a Murder
3/28 - Diary of a Country Priest/Journal d'un curé de campagne, Marnie, The Third Man (IndieFlix), Trouble in Paradise
3/29 - The Man Who Knew Too Much
3/30 - Mildred Pierce dir. Curtiz (HBO Max), What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? (HBO)
3/31 - The Children's Hour, Léon Morin, Priest/Léon Morin, prêtre
4/1 - Easter Parade, Lawrence of Arabia, A Star Is Born dir. Cukor
4/2 - At the Circus, Murder, My Sweet, My Fair Lady
4/3 - Seven Brides for Seven Brothers
4/4 - Brute Force (HBO, Criterion Channel, FlixFling), Shadow of a Doubt
4/5 - The Heiress
4/6 - World on a Wire/Welt am Draht (Criterion)
4/7 - I Shot Jesse James (HBO, Criterion)
4/8 - Psycho
4/9 - Paris, Texas (HBO, Criterion), Wise Blood (HBO, Criterion)
4/10 - The Jazz Singer dir. Alan Crosland
4/13 - Il bidone (Criterion), Jewel Robbery
4/15 - Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (HBO)
4/16 - Finian's Rainbow, Nanook of the North (HBO)
4/17 - The Searchers (HBO), Stagecoach (Prime, HBO, Criterion)
4/19 - Late Spring (HBO, Criterion)
4/22 - A Woman's Face dir. Cukor

And two more obscure/forgotten gems that deserve a popular revival. For the first one I'll just paraphrase what I enthusiastically PM'ed Moose about a month ago:

TCM recently showed this wild noir called Born to Kill (1947) which was helmed by Robert Wise of all people. (Naturally Eddie Muller in his intro noted this disconnect and called Wise "probably the sweetest man in the movie business.") One would need go back to Sternberg to find such a volatile cocktail of sex, violence and greed, and it has rarely been matched since. Another remarkable thing about this sui generis picture: Deadlier than the Male, the James Gunn novel it's based on, happens to be the only one he published... at the barely legal drinking age of 21! Apart from Sherlock Holmes crime fiction has never been my thing, but it's doubtful this often hackneyed genre has ever seen a more precocious and accomplished debut than Gunn's.

Possibly Wise's best work along with The Day the Earth Stood Still, and perhaps my favorite Wise film period. Here's the Muller intro plus the outro with Max Allen Collins:


The second title, Native Son/Sangre negra (1951), is even more of a curiosity, and I probably would've skipped it if not for the fact that Richard Wright himself starred as the protagonist Bigger Thomas. And it's true the film only begins to approach the great (if flawed) novel's radical subversion of race, class and gender - for one thing Bigger's attitude at the end of the former is closer to resigned acceptance than angry defiance - and Wright was too old for the role by half. But if the writer's untrained acting was amateurish it was no more so than the supposedly trained (though IMDb lists only this film as his sole acting credit) Gene Michael's Jan Herlone, and I've never cared much for by-the-book verisimilitude as the sine qua non of acting especially when the work in question calls for greater emphasis on identity, a test I say Wright passes if not with flying colors then with more than satisfactory affinity.

Here's hoping this previously mutilated artifact will enjoy a wider reception now that its Kino Lorber digital restoration has had its premiere on TCM. Don't be fooled by its "rotten" score on RT, as it's likely to prove more rewarding than many other films of far greater renown and stature:


No time for housekeeping (it's almost midnight!). Maybe later.
 
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Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
Been a while. Let's start with worthy titles leaving TCM within the next month, as always sorted by the last date to watch with alternate streaming services in parentheses:
3/28 - Diary of a Country Priest/Journal d'un curé de campagne, Marnie, The Third Man (IndieFlix), Trouble in Paradise
This is a great lineup. "The Third Man" is one of my favorite films. Have you seen "Pickpocket," also directed by "Diary of a Country Priest" director Robert Bresson?

"Pickpocket"



 

Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
"Tokyo Drifter" (Seijun Suzuki, 1966)

Stylish and entertaining Japanese noir on acid.


"Branded to Kill" (Seijun Suzuki, 1967)

Stylish and entertaining Japanese noir on stronger acid.

 
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