What was the last movie you watched?

Crocodile

Legend
I watched this 1972 movie called Thief In the night. It’s a movie from an evangelical Christian genre about the rapture. I then followed a similar genre movie called Left Behind with Nicholas Cage which deals with the same topic,
 

Bhagi Katbamna

Hall of Fame
The 13 Warriors with Antonio Banderas. Really enjoyable. The scene that shows how Banderas starts understanding the Norsemen was really well done.
 

NonP

Hall of Fame
Been more than six weeks since my last update (you can blame Tokyo "2020" for that). Let's look at the worthy TCM titles (iffy ones are asterisked), sorted as usual by the last date to watch with alternate streaming services and links to my old capsule reviews where available:

8/22 - Edward, My Son (1949), Night Moves (1975 | Criterion Channel), Meet Me in St. Louis (1944), The Pirate (1948), A Star Is Born (1954 | HBO Max)
8/23 - The Canterville Ghost (1944), Summer Stock (1950), Trouble in Paradise (1932 | FlixFling)
8/24 - H. M. Pulham, Esq. (1941), Human Desire (1954)
8/25 - The Big Heat (1953), Cool Hand Luke (1967 | HBO), Crossfire (1947), In a Lonely Place (1950 | Amazon Prime), The Man Who Played God (1932), Out of Africa (1985)*, The Way We Were (1973)*
8/26 - The Gay Divorcee (1934), Shoot the Piano Player/Tirez sur le pianiste (1960 | HBO, Criterion)
8/27 - Act of Violence (1949), America America (1963), An American Romance (1944), Bonnie and Clyde (1967 | HBO), The Strange Love of Martha Ivers (1946 | Prime, Paramount+, EPIX, Pure Flix, IndieFlix, FlixFling)
8/28 - Adam's Rib (1949), The Big Country (1958), Bringing Up Baby (1938), Moby Dick (1956 | Criterion), The Omen (1976), Woman of the Year (1942)
8/29 - A Child Is Waiting (1963), The Long Gray Line (1955)
8/30 - The Asphalt Jungle (1950 | Criterion), Marked Woman (1937), Secrets & Lies (1996 | HBO, Criterion), Western Union (1941)
8/31 - All This, and Heaven Too (1940), Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969), Odds Against Tomorrow (1959), Satan Met a Lady (1936), Witness for the Prosecution (1957)
9/1 - Look Back in Anger (1959 | HBO, Criterion)
9/3 - Cabin in the Sky (1943)
9/4 - Chimes at Midnight (1965 | HBO, Criterion)
9/5 - Angel Face (1953), Macao (1952 | Criterion)
9/11 - Mata Hari (1931)
9/12 - Tout va bien (1972 | Criterion)
9/14 - The Clock (1945)
9/16 - The Cobweb (1955)
9/18 - Kid Glove Killer (1942)
9/20 - The Sea of Grass (1947)

Just a reminder that TCM clears out its library around 8 pm, so you West Coasters may wanna use the next hour wisely (those of you in the East are probably out of luck already).

For that reason I'll get to TCM's most welcome Summer Under the Stars pick later. Just a quick shout-out to The Pirate, Vincente Minnelli's neglected 1948 musical which probably derives its limited fame from its delightful "Be a Clown" (penned by none other than Cole Porter) numbers:


Of course any film that features my gal Judy at the top of her carefree form is a must-see by default. But I gotta say, when I saw the whole thing for the 1st time earlier this year I was most impressed by the deliriously campy ballet sequence (featured in the 1974 MGM musical compilation That's Entertainment!) which showcases Gene Kelly at his most awesomely virile:


To call those thighs pure muscle would be an understatement. Gene was about Tom Cruise's height (5' 7") but you can bet your house the guy could leg-press 3 times his weight at least. Just dayum!

And even if you tend to agree with Ed Lowry that "there is a dominance of style over theme" in Minnelli's work you're likely to concede that much of this film is a triumph of style. He might have made better films, but none as charming and mischievous as this underappreciated classic.

Now some replies:

"Loves of a Blonde" (Milos Forman, 1965)
Milos escaped Czechoslavakia and made "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest" and many other great films.
If you haven't already you may wanna check out Forman's earlier Black Peter (1964), too. I had the good fortune of attending the 2017 North American premiere of its digital restoration at the NGA, and while it's probably not in the same class as its two great successors it indirectly presages the Prague Spring by four years and clearly upstages his Oscar winner whose streamlined American ethos barely shows any traces of his previously acute engagement with the world.

Bhowani Junction (1953) - quite a waste of time. Romantic movie set during Indian Independence struggle (1947). An anglo-Indian girl played by Ava Gardner falls in love with first an anglo-indian guy, then an Indian Sikh and finally an english colonel. All this in trying to find her "identity".
Surprised and sorry to hear that about one of Cukor's best (if underappreciated) works. Did you not find it convincing due to Ava Gardner playing the role or were you just not impressed with the identity angle?

Good. That’s roughly 10% of the total posts of this 11 year old thread. You must be the main contributor here.
*cough cough*
 

Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
If you haven't already you may wanna check out Forman's earlier Black Peter (1964), too. I had the good fortune of attending the 2017 North American premiere of its digital restoration at the NGA, and while it's probably not in the same class as its two great successors it indirectly presages the Prague Spring by four years and clearly upstages his Oscar winner whose streamlined American ethos barely shows any traces of his previously acute engagement with the world.
Yeah, I really enjoyed it. Criterion included the restored version in its "Czechoslovak New Wave" collection. The amusing teenage awkwardness, lack of awareness, and ennui really rang true, and Forman captured a youthful dissatisfaction and generational divide that's interesting in retrospect. The film was actually somewhat subversive and reflective of the increasing cultural freedom that led to the Russian tanks rolling in four years later.

Watched "Wag the Dog" after not seeing it for some time. There's a bit too much truth to the satire.

 

Bartelby

Bionic Poster
It probably has occurred to the post-Gorbachev generation that it may have been important to stop NATO tanks, which now includes Czech ones, from rolling up to the outskirts of Moscow.

Yeah, I really enjoyed it. Criterion included the restored version in its "Czechoslovak New Wave" collection. The amusing teenage awkwardness, lack of awareness, and ennui really rang true, and Forman captured a youthful dissatisfaction and generational divide that's interesting in retrospect. The film was actually somewhat subversive and reflective of the increasing cultural freedom that led to the Russian tanks rolling in four years later.

Watched "Wag the Dog" after not seeing it for some time. There's a bit too much truth to the satire.

 

ollinger

G.O.A.T.
"The Chair" (2021)

Not a film but a new series with Sandra Oh as chairperson of a small college English department. Supposed to be a somewhat dark comedy, first episode a little dark but no discernible comedy.
 

Sentinel

Bionic Poster
Re-watched The Book Thief (2013) - Nice movie about how two kids see the WW.

Now watching another movie with the same girl (Sophie Nélisse) and also Kathy Bates and Octavia Spencer. The Great Gilly Hopkins (2015).

 

Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
“Force Majeure”


I enjoyed it. A Swedish family’s holiday at a ski resort is used to examine relationships and human behavior. The director puts the audience as the distanced observer of the family, whose lives seem small and fragile in the vastness of time and the film’s setting. Excellent filmmaking.
 

Sentinel

Bionic Poster
Buckley's Chance was a nice family movie.


So was After Love 2020.
A widow discovers her husband had another family and goes to meet them.


I finally got to watch Mary Poppins (1964) last week. Watched Paper Moon (1973) for the 3rd time, and Midnight in Paris (2011) for the 2nd.
And my old favourite, Goodbye Mr. Chips (1939) with Robert Donat and Greer Garson.
 
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Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
Classic--nothing like NYC in the 1970s for a gritty corrupt cop film. I recently watched two other interesting Sidney Lumet films, "Dog Day Afternoon," also starring Al Pacino in gritty 1970s NYC, and "Running on Empty," starring a young River Phoenix.

NYC is a great setting for films, and the Criterion Channel just added "New York Stories," a collection of films set in NYC, which are grouped by categories.



https://www.criterionchannel.com/new-york-stories
 

ollinger

G.O.A.T.
"Worth" (2021)

Michael Keaton as attorney Ken Feinberg, who was tasked with formulating a way to divide up the 9/11 Victims Compensation Fund. You can almost hear violins playing in the background, and as with TTW, the film demonstrates that no outcome can please everyone.
 

Poisoned Slice

Bionic Poster
a wee bit messy but Epic™ movie

I like the stink of the streets. It makes me feel good. And I like the smell of it, it opens up my lungs. And it gives me a hard-on.
I think my won't rush back to it comment sounds a bit harsh. Just meant that I won't be watching it again today. Pretty sure this was the first time I've watched the non butchered version all the way through. It's a great movie and I enjoy Bobby D. even though Noodles does some despicable things.

Max, you are one crazy, crazy, crazy, crazy snake.
 

Sentinel

Bionic Poster
The Last Vermeer
Excellent.
I liked that too, I also watched one called A Real Vermeer (2016) which was interesting.


Watched The Good Liar (2019) on Netflix.
Hellen Mirren, Ian McKellan and Jim Carter. Good cast but the movie tried to get overly complicated.


Yesterday watched The Last Letter from your Lover (2021) a nice soapy romance story about a journalist (Felicity Jones) who digs up some love letters dating back four or more decades in the office archives and tries to piece together the story and track down the real couple behind it.
 

ollinger

G.O.A.T.
"Midnight Special" (2016)

Promising cast (Driver, Edgerton, Shannon, Shepard, Dunst) but a familiar special-powers sci-fi premise, story drags, have seen it all before, hard to stay interested in this one.
 

Sentinel

Bionic Poster
My Life (1993) - With Michael Keaton and Nicole Kidman. Liked it.

Keaton is terminally ill, cancer. His wife is about to deliver. He starts making a home movie about himself so his kid gets to know him.

Serendipity (2001) - so-so. Romcom, John Cusack and Kate Beckinsale meet at a Christmas sale and then are getting married (not to each other) but then start crazily trying the find one another.
 

Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
"Xiao Wu"



Jia Zhangke is one of the leading film directors in China, and “Xiao Wu” is an early film (1997) made outside the official Chinese state-run film system, and considered an underground film. It was shot on 16mm on a very low budget, used non-professional actors, and has a neorealist authenticity. It’s the story of a lost young man who is unable to find a place in the changing China. I enjoyed it.
 

Bartelby

Bionic Poster
Strangely enough, I did see one of his films once called The World. It's a critical look at young people working at a Disneyland-style theme park.

This is his first non-underground film apparently, but he was trained at the prestigious Beijing Film School and now releases under the Chinese Film Bureau.

Hardly a rebel, more an insider. The usual sort of indy success followed by raptured acceptance into the Hollywood system, or at least its Chinese version.

"Xiao Wu"



Jia Zhangke is one of the leading film directors in China, and “Xiao Wu” is an early film (1997) made outside the official Chinese state-run film system, and considered an underground film. It was shot on 16mm on a very low budget, used non-professional actors, and has a neorealist authenticity. It’s the story of a lost young man who is unable to find a place in the changing China. I enjoyed it.
 

Sentinel

Bionic Poster
My Salinger Year (2020) - quite nice.


The main girl, Qualley, is the daughter of Andie McDowell !
 

Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
Strangely enough, I did see one of his films once called The World. It's a critical look at young people working at a Disneyland-style theme park.

This is his first non-underground film apparently, but he was trained at the prestigious Beijing Film School and now releases under the Chinese Film Bureau.

Hardly a rebel, more an insider. The usual sort of indy success followed by raptured acceptance into the Hollywood system, or at least its Chinese version.
I watched "The World" last night--excellent film, IMO. Very bleak. Cinematographer Yu Lik-Wai created some great images. "Still Life" is next.

 

tennis4me

Hall of Fame
Guillermo Vilas - Settling the Score. It's on Netflix, about an Argentinian journalist strives to prove that Vilas was denied the world #1 ranking in the 1970s. Lots of old match clips I've never seen and interesting facts.
 

Sudacafan

Talk Tennis Guru
Guillermo Vilas - Settling the Score. It's on Netflix, about an Argentinian journalist strives to prove that Vilas was denied the world #1 ranking in the 1970s. Lots of old match clips I've never seen and interesting facts.
Yes, by the way, the movie showed that the ATP rankings which started in 1973 had some shortcomings and incongruencies in its first 5 or 6 years.
The journalist quest was to prove that, according to the review of the calculations that the rankings were built in those years, Vilas would have been #1 for some weeks in the 70's.
Curiously, the weeks that the journalist proved that Vilas would have been #1 were not in his best career year: 1977, when he won RG and USO and set a record of 50 consecutive matches won, but earlier, for seven weeks in two stints in 1975 and early 1976.
The ATP dismissed Vilas claim, but did not object any of the calculations reviewed. They just said that rankings were not published every week, and that they would not review them.
In the women's tour, Goolagong claimed for ranking corrections that gave her the #1 ranking at the beginning of the 70's, but she was successful.
 

MICHELUZZO

Professional
is this really good ?? i watched the first 10 minutes of the movie,, and it was kind of boring at that point so i just turned it off........ Should i have continued ??:unsure:
Definitely. It's slow, but worth the watch. Beautiful scenes and just morale. Skip if your expecting action/dragons/maidens. Cheers!
 

Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
"Boxcar Bertha"

Roger Corman meets Martin Scorsese, and Corman won. I’d never watched this before in its entirety, and barely made it through this time.


This sums things up pretty well:

Martin Scorsese’s Forgotten Gangster Movie
Everyone knows ‘Mean Streets,’ ‘Goodfellas,’ and most recently ‘The Irishman’—but what about ‘Boxcar Bertha’?
By Keith Phipps Oct 30, 2019

Any line between Who’s That Knocking at My Door and Mean Streets has to take a side trip to rural Arkansas for a violent exploitation film made quickly and cheaply for Roger Corman, a film that found Scorsese learning the limits of what he could do within a system that had helped start the careers of many of his peers. While working as an assistant sound editor for John Cassavetes on 1971’s Minnie and Moskowitz (“I didn’t do anything!” Scorsese told Vanity Fair in 2018. “I just would follow him around and watch him cut film late at night, and he would dictate stories”), Scorsese caught Corman’s eye. The low-budget producer thought he might be a good fit to shoot a sequel to Bloody Mama, a Corman-directed 1970 hit inspired by the exploits of the Depression-era outlaws in the Barker-Karpis Gang (costarring future Scorsese leading man Robert De Niro).

That movie never happened. Instead, Scorsese took the assignment of directing Boxcar Bertha, another crime-filled film set during the Great Depression. The 1967 success of Bonnie and Clyde and a free-floating nostalgia for the early decades of the 20th century had helped create an audience for bloody stories of gangsters and outlaws that lasted into the early ’70s, and Boxcar Bertha was designed to satisfy that audience. Scorsese came to see it as a learning experience and, as he described it in Chris Nashawaty’s Crab Monsters, Teenage Cavemen, and Candy Stripe Nurses: Roger Corman—King of the B Movie, a crash course in “the realities of the marketplace.” “There has to be a chase scene here; there has to be a touch of nudity there,” Scorsese said, imitating Corman. “He didn’t apologize for that. This is what we do—every fifteen pages in the script, there should be a suggestion of nudity.” The challenge, Scorsese would discover, was finding a way to express himself within the bounds of this formula.

Its harshest criticism, however, came from Cassavetes. Scorsese frequently tells the story of the fiercely independent filmmaker’s assessment after seeing a rough cut: “Marty, you’ve just spent a whole year of your life making a piece of ****. It’s a good picture, but you’re better than the kind of people who make this kind of movie.” That moment has become one of the tentpoles of the Scorsese origin story, alongside his sickly, asthma-afflicted childhood, his lifelong movie obsession, and his time running the streets of Little Italy with ruffians. Perhaps without it, Scorsese might have talked himself into staying with Corman, enrolling for another year in the B-movie film school that proved so beneficial to filmmakers like Jonathan Demme, Joe Dante, Ron Howard, and others. But Scorsese had already graduated film school. He already knew what he wanted to make, a screenplay of his then called Season of the Witch, but soon to be called Mean Streets,
https://www.theringer.com/movies/20...ese-boxcar-bertha-gangster-movie-the-irishman
 
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